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Full text of "Brethren's Family Almanac, The (1896)"

7896 




Brethren s Family Almanac. 




\\m Won't Be a Growd. 



The NEW L P. SEAT 

FOE. BXJO-a-iEs. 




Room for One More. 



This seat placed on the seat of a vehicle between two persons, occupies 
ly one inch of room between the limbs, and affords an excellent seat for a 
ird person, either adult or child. When not in use, it folds into a package 
o inches by eight by eleven. It weighs but three pounds and carries with 
se five hundred pounds. 

Used as a footstool in the house, it does not slip on the carpet, and if it is 
aced on an ordinary chair, it answers as a high chair for a child at the table. 

Used as a hassock, it is light, cool, and does not form a harbor for 
oths and dust, and it forms a handy little seat at picnics. 

The framp is built of steel and it is upholstered in tapestry or velvet brus- 
Is carpet. It is practically indestructible and yet as light as is consistent with 
."oper strength. In Resign it is simple and artistic. The comfort it bestows 
id its convenient usefulness about the house make it a most welcome addition, 
id its small cost with great wearing qualities make it the most valuable addi- 
3n to our household furniture. Entirely unsolicited, this little device has 
ready received words of praise from thousands (its sale the first ten days it was 
1 the market was one thousand) and the only criticism it has received was. 
Why didn't some one think of this long ago." If its only fault is its 
>ng-deferred appearance, we may well bid it welcome to our belongings. 

Manufactured by 

WILLIS W. FRANTZ, 

Waynesboro, Pa. 



PRICE, in Tapestry Brussels, 
PRICE, in Wilton Velvet, 








Brethren's Family Almanac. 



HOMES * IN * NORTH * DAKOTA 



IT IS J^ IP-A-OT 



That North Dakota coal can be purchased at the mines 
from gi.oo to $1.50 per ton. 

That lands can be bought in North Dakota for a little more 
per acre than the rent comes to back East. 

That North Dakota is a country where horses and cattle 
are not afflicted with fevers, hogs with cholera, and sheep with 
footrot and scab. 

That good hogs can be raised in North Dakota without an 
ear of corn. Barley and other small grains and roots will make 
firmer and sweeter meat than corn. 

That North Dakota has several large colonies of Brethren, 
many of whom located on free government land in sections where 
there is still room for other homesteaders. 

That North Dakota has 70,000 square miles of prairie lands, 
watered by living streams and lakes, and contains a portion of 
the largest artesian basin in the world. 

That North Dakota is practically exempt from malaria and 
the many attendant diseases. Quinine is not in the demand 
that it is in Indiana, Missouri and the South. 

That when you go to North Dakota and want to go to 
church you will hnd every denomination represented, worshiping 
in edifices that would be a credit to older States. 

That North Dakota has all of the advantages of a new coun- 
try in cheap lands and all of the conveniences of an old country 
in schools, churches, markets, postal and railway facilities. 

That the Great Northern is the principal railway of the 
State, reaching more towns than any other line. All of the 
Brethren colonies are located along the Great Northern Railway, 

That there is still good free land in the Devil's Lake and 
Turtle Mountain districts; lands ready for the plow; free from 
stones and stumps; on which a crop can be grown from the sod 
plowing. 

That the owners of large bodies of land in North Dakota 
are dividing their farms into tracts to suit purchasers and sell- 
ing on the crop plan, that is, taking a share of crops each year 
in payment. 

That instances are common where the crop of one season 
is sufficient to pay for the land. Even if one year will not do it, 
a few years will do it, in the meantime the improvements be- 
long to the person doing the work. 

That an advantage new settlers have in the Red River Val- 
ley, Devil's Lake district and Turtle Mountain country is near- 
ness to markets. These localities have ample railway facilities 
and there is always sale for farm products. 

That the man who now secures a farm in North Dakota and 
improves it has a heritage for his children. In proof of this we 
need only to point to the importance attached to the ownership 
of land in the densely populated parts of the world. 

That North Dakota has, in active operation, a State univer- 
sity, two normal schools, an agricultural college and a school 
for deaf and dumb; that it has provided for an industrial school, 
a school of forestry, a scientific school, a college for the blind 
and a reform school, these being separate from the private and 
denominational colleges. 

That North Dakota has 1,500 public schools, employing 
nearly 2,000 teachers; 3,000,000 acres of public lands were given 
the State on its admission for the support of her schools and 
institutions, and none of it can be sold for less than %\o per 
acre. When the lands are all sold the State will have a perma- 
nent school fund of $30,000,000. 



That the climate, grasses and water combine in givi: 
North Dakota all the conditions necessary to raising live stoc 
and that industry has become a large one. 

That Western farmers on cheap lands compete with Ea 
ern farmers on high-priced lands. Ten dollar land in the W( 
will produce as much or more than hundred dollar land in t 
East. 

That flax is one of the profitable crops of the Dakotas. 
single crop from the sod has been made to p^y for a farm. T 
fibre is of unusual excellence while the seed is oily to a degr 
unknown back East. 

That the wild fruits of North Dakota are very prolific a: 
of an excellent quality. Wild gooseberries and currants a 
smooth and free from " pickles," and of large size and juicy, a 
are much improved by cultivation. 

That a settler on a prairie farm in North Dakota does n 
have before him the task of a life-time, of felling trees, cutti: 
brush, grubbing, clearing and stump-pulling, which a locatii 
in a timbered country invariably requires. 

That North Dakota has the reputation of being a gre 

f)roducer of wheat, which the facts amply sustain, but it is equ 
y capable of producing barley, flax, nay, corn and potato( 
which it does every year by millions of bushels. 

That a gold mine is soon " worked out," and then the mi 
is worthless, its location usually being on a mountain sic 
sterile and rocky. A good wheat field lasts forever. They rai 
wheat in Palestine tto-day on the land where Boaz reaped a: 
Ruth gleaned. 

That England, Northern France, Germany and Denmai 
Norway and Sweden are all far north of the northern bounda 
of Minnesota and North Dakota. The southern-most point 
England by latitude is 70 miles north of the 49th parallel 
northern boundary of Minnesota, North Dakota and Montana. 

That the fertile soil, the healthful climate, the improv 
social condition of the people by schools, churches and the 
creased facilities for intercourse witlT each otner and the o 
side world, are each year making North Dakota more and mc 
attractive to the farmers of the East who are seeking better c 
portunities and more productive fields in which to expend th 
energies. 

That those who wish to know how the Brethren coloni 
are getting along in North Dakota are invited to write to any 
the following ministers: Rev. Amos B. Peters, Cando, N. I 
Rev. Silas N. Eversole, Rutten, N. D.; Rev. Geo. W. Stor 
Crary, N. D.; Rev. J. W. Hartsock. Grand Harbor, N. D.; R( 
Geo. Swihart, Mayville, N. D.; Rev. Geo. Strycker, Mayvil 
N. D.; Rev. Levi E. Miller, Chfford, N. D. 

That one of the most important facts in connection w: 
farm life in North Dakota is the healthtulness of the clima 
Though the winters are colder than in the more southern Stat 
the summers are delightful, and there is remarkable freed( 
from pulmonary disorders. Few cases of consumption : 
known and such as do occur are those brought in. Cases 
typhoid fever, dysentery, and like diseases, are not known 
prevail epidemically. 

That North Dakota is generally considered to be treele 
yet no less than fifty kinds and varieties of native trees exi 
besides twenty or more kinds of shrubs, exclusive of the cu! 
vated forest and fruit trees and shrubs. The Turtle Mount: 
country contains the largest forests, but large belts of timl 
will be'found around Devil's Lake, in the Pembina Hills, afong t 
Missouri, Mouse, Red and other rivers. Artificial groves ; 
easily grown. Every farmer can have trees just when he, vvai 
them. 



For further information about North Dakota, address 

220 SOTJTH cXi^I^:K: STI^:K!:E3T, cmo^a-o, 1X.X1-, 

Who located all the Brethren Colonies in that State. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



k 



A HISTORY OF THE BRETHREN CHURCH 
AT QERMANTOWN. 



The most important date in the history of 
le Brethren Church in America is Dec. 25, 
723. On that day three important events 
-anspired, viz.: the gathering of the first 
ruits of the Brethren in America, the organ- 

Ea dng of the church at Germantown, and 
olding their first love feast and com- 
lunion in America. The " first fruits " just 

deg, mentioned consisted of six members bap- 



The history of the Germantown church, 
when fully written, will make a volume in 
itself. It is easily seen, therefore, I can do 
but little with details in so brief an article 
The main facts must be rapidly sketched and 
the transition from one subject to another 
more or less abrupt. I must stop long 
enough, however, to give the names of the 
members of this newly-organized body in 
America. Of the twenty families who had 
come over in 17 19, only seventeen members 
were in or near Germantown to enter the new 



)catii 




GERMANTOWN MEETINGHOUSE, PA. 



ized, near Germantown, by Elder Peter 
JJBecker, in the Wissahickon Creek, now fa- 
nous in story and song. These six had 
:ome from a point in the valley of the 
Schuylkill, about 35 miles from Germantown, 
ind they soon became the nucleus of the 
Zloventry church, which was organized Nov. 
7, 1724. 



Thirteen Brethren : — Peter 
Becker, Henry Traut, Jeremiah Traut, Balser 
Traut, Henry Holzapfel, John Gommery, 
Stephen Koch, Jacob Koch, John Hilde- 
brand, Daniel Kitter, George Balser Gantz, 
John Preisz, John Kaempfer. Four sisters: — 
Magdalena Traut, Anna Gommery, Maria 
Hildebrand, Johanna Gantz. The six newly 



"Year] 



FA^]VIILY J^T.1^AJS[J^C, 



[1896.^ 



ECLIPSES FOR THE YEAR 1896. 

In the year 1896 there will be four Eclipses —two of the Sun and two of the Moon. 

The First is an Annular Eclipse of the Sun, February 13th, at 10 o'clock, 1 minute, 
in the forenoon. Invisible here. Visible to Cape Colony, South Atlantic Ocean, Patagonia and the 
South Polar Regions. 

The Second is a Partial Eclipse of the Moon, February 28th, at 2 o'clock, 8 minutes 
in the afternoon. Invisible here. Visible generally in Europe, Asia and Africa. 

The Third is a Total Eclipse of the Sun, August 8th, at 10 o'clock, 59 minutes in the 
evening. Invisible here. Visible to Asia, Europe, Alaska and the Pacific Ocean. 

The Fourth is a Partial Eclipse of the Moon, August 23d, and visible as follows : 



eastern states. 



central states. 



Moon enters Penumbra on the 23d, at 12 o'clock, 9 min., A.JVI. 22d, 11 o'clock, 29 min., P. M. 



Moon enters shadow " " 23d, " 12 " 27 

Middle of the Eclipse " " 23d, "1 " 00 

Moon leaves shadow *' " 23d, " 3 " 32 

Moon leaves Penumbra " " 23d, " 1 " 50 



22d, 11 
23d, 12 
2 
4 



P.M. 
A.M. 



WESTERN STATES. 

10 o'clock, 49 min., P, M. 

11 " 07 " P.M. 
11 " 40 " P. M. 

2 " 12 " A.M. 

3 " 30 " A.M. 



Jupiter (11) is Called the Governing Planet this Year. 
CHAKACTERS OF THE CONSTELLATIONS. 



^ Aries, the Ram. 
(^^ Taurus, the Bull. 
tj^ Gemini, the Twins 
>«g Cancer, the Crab. 



ifJlNew Moon 



^ Sagittarius, the Bownn. 
^ Capricornus, the Goat. 
^ Aquarius, the Butler. 
'S Pisces, the Fishes. 



(ff^ Leo, the Lion. 
^ Virgo, the Virgin. 
^ Libra, the Balance. 
cjg Scorpio, the Scorpion. 

ASTRONOMICAL CHARACTERS EXPLAINED. 

Q Moon's ascending Node, or Dragon's 

Head. 
Q Moon's descending Node, or Dragon's 

Tail. 
^ Moon's Ascension. 
^ Moon's Descension. 
]) Moon in apogee, farthest from earth. 
]) Moon in perigee, nearest to the earth. 



First Quarter, or Moon in general 

iFull Moon. 

Last Quarter, or Moon in general. 



T? Saturn, $ Venus, 

71 Jupiter, ^ Mercury, 

^ Mars, Earth, j) Moon 

O Sun, }^ Herschel. 



PLANETS AND ASPECTS. 

d Conjunction, or planets in the same longitude. 
>)< Sextile, when they are 60 degrees apart. 
n Quartile, when they are 90 degrees distant. 
A Trine, when they are 120 degrees distant. 
(^Opposition, when they are 180 degrees distant. 

CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical Letter 
Epact 



Roman Indiction 
Julian Period 



ED Lunar Cycle or Golden NufliDer 16 

15 Solar Cycle 1 

Ember Days : February 26th, May 27th, September 16th, December 16th 

MOVABLE FESTIVALS. 



9 
6601) 



Septuagesima Sunday, February 2d. 
Sexagesima Sunday, February 9th. 
Quinquagesima Sunday, February 16th. 
Shrove Tuesday, February 18th. 
.\sli \Ve<hiesdny, February 19th. 
Palm Sunday, Mnrch '?9th. 
Easter Suiull.v, April 5th. 



Ascension Day, May 14th. 

Wliitsuntide, May 24th. 

Trinity Sunday, May 31st. 

Corpus Christi, June 4th. 

Sundays after Trinity are 25. 

First Sundnv in Advent, November 29th. 



96. 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



5 



aptized were as follows : Martin Urner and 

'ife, Henry Landis and wife, Frederick Lang 
'|jj;nd Jan Mayle. These twenty-three then 

onstituted the first Brethren church in 
"'"^ Lmerica. They celebrated the love feast on 
the bat Christmas evening (how fitting the day 

Dr the birth of a church), at the house of 
Es, ohn Gommery, Peter Becker officiating. 
\\ listory says it " created a great stir among 
I J he people of that neighborhood." 

But the organizing of the church at Ger- 

lantown did more than create a stir in the 

leighborhood. It caused intense interest 

mong the scattered members, and in the 

111, oUowing fall of 1724, when several of the 

^t jermantown Brethren went on a tour to visit 

', ,11 the members, there was a general awaken- 

ng, a number were baptized, and on Nov. 7 

md 12, respectively, the Coventry and Cones- 

oga churches were organized. There was 

^^ ejoicing everywhere and the good news was 

Iient across the sea to the Brethren still re- 
naining in Germany and Holland. History 
>ays that during these times there was especi- 
dly an awakening among the young people 
n Germantown. 

This awakening, however, could not con- 
:inue with unabated interest, and during the 
lext five years the work continued with vary- 
ing success. For a time there were internal 
roubles that sorely harassed the infant 
:hurch. The self-righteous Conrad Beissel, 
who was baptized in 1724, and became' the 
minister of the Conestoga church upon its 
organization, soon made trouble. He caused 
great confusion, that reached even to Ger- 
mantown, and ultimately resulted in some 
members withdrawing from the German- 
town church and hiding away in the Ephrata 
monastery. The fate of the Beissel move- 
ment is sad history indeed. But this sad 
history is the strongest possible argument 
that that spirit of selfishness which would 
shut itself in and away from the world, and 
endeavor to confine the grace of God in their 
own hearts, is antagonistic in the highest 
degree to the spirit of Him who " went about 



doing good." History is, however, repeating 
itself. Selfishness can not live even under 
the guise of religion. This, then, was the 
first ** division," and considering the circum- 
stances of those early times and the small 
membership, it was the most serious our 
Brotherhood has ever had. But for these 
dark and troublous times, in which all shared 
more or less, there was a bright dawning for 
Germantown. In Germany the little Breth- 
ren church had been hated and persecuted 
and driven from place to place by the in- 
tolerant spirit of the Catholics, Lutherans and 
Reformed. In 1719 twenty families had 
come over under the leadership of Peter 
Becker, and now the remainder, about thirty 
families, came over in the fall of 1729, under 
Alexander Mack himself. It was a great" 
day for Germantown, and it was destined 
henceforth to become a great center of in- 
fluence and power. While it has not retained 
its great influence until now, it does retain its 
position as a center of great interest. Such 
an array of prominent ministers as German- 
town has had for a century and a quarter 
from its organization, is really remarkable, 
and would have been so for any congregation 
or church in any age. 

They were prominent, not because they 
happened to be identified with a small 
denomination, but because they were men 
of talent, of power, of real inward piety 
and devotion to principle ; men whose lives 
bear study and with whose extensive labors 
and vast accomplishments we ought to be 
more familiar. They had the spirit of 
martyrs. The sacrifice of their fortunes for- 
ever seals the truth of their charity and the 
devotion to principle ! 

Alexander Mack, who had organized the 
church and became its first minister, at 
Schwarzenau, in 1708, had planted better 
than he knew, amid the persecutions in Ger- 
many. How gratifying it must have been 
when he arrived at Germantown to see the 
"watering" of his now efficient co-laborer, 
and the "increase" that God had already 



Year] 



fa^m:ily j^j^isij^NJ^c, 



[189G 



GBNTENNIflL f\LMflNf\G FOR 1896. 
JUPITER IS THE RULING PLANET THIS YEAR. 



The Year in General. — Will be tolerably 
good, yet more humid than dry; but like Saturn 
its predecessor, with long winter and terrible 
Cold, it will be late so that grain and seed will 
grow at least three weeks later than in other years. 

Spring. — Until the 1st of May it will be cold 
and damp; in the middle for ten or twelve days, 
temperate and thawing weather; after until the 
end, cold and damp. 

Summer. — The oeginning will be cold and 
damp, in the middle it will be good, interspersed 
with much thunder; at the end, quite warm. If 
in this year the Summer be dry, which scarcely 
happens in twenty-one years, the grain will be 
dear. If an Eclipse of the sun occurs in February, 
March, April or May, the Summer will be dry. 

Fall. — Will have an abundance of rain. 

Winter.— The beginning will have a few days 
quite cold and much snow; the latter part will be 
quite mild, without snow, yet very windy. 

Spring Crops. — This will be a good year for 
barley. If the Summer be not dry, the quality 
and yield will be good. A good supply should be 
provided, as in the two following years little is to 
be expected. Oats, peas and millet will be a light 
crop. Flax and hemp will be small but good. 
Hay and aftermath will be good, but not in all 
places; so also with cabbage and turnips. There 



will be but little hay, straw and fodder in the tw 
subsequent years, therefore good provision shoul 
be made in this year. 

Fall Crops.— Sheep must be kept otf hot: 
Spring and Fall crops. Even if sheep are iic 
pastured on the grain in the Spring it will be lat( 
Notwithstanding Jupiter is inclined to moisturt 
the grain, oftentimes in this j'ear, will be late 
than usual. 

Fall-seeding.— It is better to sow early, eve; 
if the Winter set in late, especially wheat, on at 
count of the rough, dry Spring, which will follow 
if the grain should grow too rank, which it se) 
dom does, it may be pastured by sheep. 

Fruit.— There will be but little fruit, and corr 
no acorns, and few beech nuts. 

Hops. — Yield light, but very good. 

Grape Culture.— In twenty-eight years it sel 
dom occurs once that in Jupiter's reign there wi] 
be choice wine, but little and sour: if advers 
aspects interrupt, the Fall will be late, and win 
will be inferior. The vines need not be coverei 
early, as the winter will be late setting in, yet i 
must not be neglected, for after Candlemas ther 
will be much sleet. If an eclipse of the Sun o( 
curs in February, March, April or May, whei 
Jupiter, Mars or the Sun rule, the wine will b 
good. 



THE FOUR SEASONS OR CARDINAL POINTS. 



eastern states. 

Spring begins March 19th, at 9 o'clock, 20 min. 
Summer begins June 20th, "5 " 25 " 
Autumn begins Sept. 22d, " 8 " 40 " 
Winter begins Dec. 21st, " 2 " 30 " 



CENTRAL STATES. 
8 o'clock, 40 min., 
4 " 45 •' 
8 " 00 " 
1 " 50 " 



WESTERN STATES. 
8 o'clock, 00 min., P. W 
4 " 05 " P. M 
7 " 20 " A. M 
1 " 10 " A. M 



The year 5657 of the Jewish Era commences at Sunset September 7th, 1896. 
The year 1314 of the Mohammedan Era begins on the 12th day of June 1896. 



flnatomu of Man'§ Bodu 

The Head and Face. 
^ Aries. 

Arms. 
j^ Gemini. 

Heart. 
« Leo. 

Reins. 
j^ Libra. 

Thighs, 
fg^ Sagittarius. 

Legs. 
^ Aquarius. 



, as said to be governed bu th e Twelve Constellations. 

N^ech. 




^ Taurus. 

Breast. 
Hg Cancer. 

Boivels. 
^ Virgo. 

Secrets. 
c|g Scorpio. 

Knees. 
^ Capricorn. 

The Feet. 
>S Pisces. 



All the calculations in this Almanac are made to solar or apparent time to which add th( 
equation in the hour table when the sun is slow and subtract it when it is fast for mean or clock time 
Dale Enterprise, Rockingham Co., Va. L. J. Heatwole. 



iOt 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



letw 



tse 



)uchsafed to his people. He went forth 
id organized a number of churches and 
rdained elders. But he was not to con- 
hoiii nue his labors long here, nor enjoy long 
y le fruits of his sacrifice and devotion. It 
eii( as enough. In 1735, just one hundred and 
jjjj xty years ago, his labors ceased. He was 
lat( ot " gathered unto his fathers," but unto 
:rangers ; and it was not until November, 
iiai894, that his remains were brought to rest 
! ' 1 the midst of his own people. He died 
omparatively a young man, aged 56 years, 
^^^ ut how much is crowded into those years ? 
^ot so long, but so well he labored! 

At Germantown the work was left in good 
*? ands and in a very prosperous condition. 
erei ^eter Becker remained the elder of the 
J^' :hurch probably until 1746. Since the 
io( trrival of the thirty families (many of whom 
J'?" ettled in and around Germantown), the pri- 
vate houses in which the Brethren held their 
neetings could not contain the people. The 
Es, nterest increased, and there was again an 
)j iwakening which much exceeded the former 
;! iwakening. It spread wherever there were 
nembers and resulted in the organization of 
nany churches in the course of a few years, 
[t was at this time (when the Brethren no 
longer could accommodate the people in 
their houses) that Christopher Saur, a noted 
Pietist, of Germantown, about the year 1732, 
built a very large dwelling. He was a man 
of means, a man of great business ability, but 
withal a man of great piety. He was much 
attached to the Brethren, but it seems he 
never united with them in full fellowship. 
For the special convenience of the Brethren, 
history says, " he had a sort of chapel erected 
in one of the rooms, and had the partitions 
dividing the rooms fastened by hinges to the 
joists in the ceiling, so that when necessity 
required it the whole floor could be con- 
verted into one large room." (The above, I 
think, comes from Bro. A. H. Cassel, through 
the Public Ledger, of Philadelphia.) Here, 
then, they worshiped for almost a genera- 
tion, probably about twenty-eight years, dur- 



ing which time the property fell into the 
hands of the son, Christopher, second. He 
was then a member, having grown up amid 
religious influences, both from his parents 
and the Brethren (his father's house was in 
reality the meetinghouse of the Brethren) 
being eleven years old when they commenced 
holding meetings there. Five years later, 
1737, he was baptized, in his sixteenth year; 
in 1747 he was elected deacon, 1748 to the 
ministry, and in 1753 he was ordained to the 
eldership, being not quite thirty-two years of 
age. His life is exceedingly interesting. 
He became a man of great influence. He 
was an eloquent and brilliant public speaker. 
He was well-known and highly esteemed all 
through the province of Pennsylvania, arid 
as a writer he was known and recognized 
throughout the colonies. He followed his 
father in the printing and publishing busi- 
ness, and together they published the first 
German Bible ever printed in America, run- 
ning through three editions. As an elder he 
was much beloved and much used by the 
church. He had the boldness of an Elijah 
in the defense of principles. In the Revo- 
lutionary War the advocacy of his peace 
principles cost him his vast estates (his 
property was all confiscated) and in addi- 
tion he received disgrace and inhuman treat- 
ment. All this at the hands of the Coloni- 
al Government. With his hair and beard 
cut off, smeared over with red and black 
paint, bareheaded and barefoot and almost 
naked, and maltreated by the soldiers, he 
was led before the Provost. He was brand- 
ed as a traitor, but utterly without proof or 
even trial, — he was finally released absolute- 
ly penniless, having nothing but the clothes 
he wore. Are we worthy successors to the 
fathers? 

I have always been thankful that Alexan- 
der Mack, Sr., had a son who was worthy 
to bear his name and fully able to be his 
successor. When the infant church at 
Schwarzenau was four years old, Alexander 
Mack, Jr., was born, — and he was baptized 



1st Month.] 



dflNUf\R:Y. 



[Days 31 



Days & Weeks 



HO 

S5 



Reniarkabie 
Days. 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 



Moon's 

Signs. 



ftspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 



s-crnsr 
Rises & Sets 
H. M. I H. M 



1 Wed. 

2 Thurs. 

3 Frid. 

4 Sat. 



20 
21 
22 
23 



JS^ew Year 
Abel Seth 
Enoch 
Methuselah 



12 14 

1 14 

2 11 

3 4 



6 40 

7 41 

8 14 

9 12 



cetl9 

7 



in Perihelion ^ 

dlf2).?Gr.Hel.Lat.N. 
3) in Perigee 
S souths 10 7 



7 23 
7 23 
7 23 
7 22 



4 3 

4 3 

4 3 

4 3 



1] Sunday after New Year. 



Matt. 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 16 min. 



5 Sunday 


24 


6 Mond'y 


25 


7 Tues. 


26 


8 Wed. 


27 


9 Thurs. 


28 


10 Friday 


29 


11 Sat. 


30 



Epiphany 

Isidor 

Erhard 

Julian 

PauVs Imp, 

Eugene 



5 


3 55 


10 15 


:i^30 


5 


4 43 


11 20 


^5% 12 


6 


5 31 


morn. 


5%24 


7 


6 20 


12 20 


« 6 


8 


7 10 


1 32 


«19 


9 


8 4 


2 57 


«30 


10 


9 


4 1 


i^i3 



^ Gr. Hel. Lat. S. S 

1/ souths 11 36 

7. Kigel so. 9 57 
[7 rises 12 10 

dT?]). Castor so. 12 2 

(5 lit]) 

d $ D- ? rises 3 38 



5 


7 22 


6 


7 21 


6 


7 21 


7 


7 21 


7 


7 20 


8 


7 20 


8 


7 19 



2] 1st Sunday after Epiphany. Luke 2. 



Day's length 9 hoars 22 min. 



12 Sunday 

13 Mond'y 


31 
J. 


14 Tues. 


2 


15 Wed. 


3 


16 Thurs. 


4 


17 Friday 

18 Sat. 


5 
6 



Menno iSinioii 
Renunciation 1536 
Menno Simon 
died 1561 

Felix 
Maurice 
Marcellus 
Anthony 
Franklin h. 



11 


10 38 


5 2 


^25 


12 


11 35 


6 13 


m 5 


12 


12 4 


3) sets 


^18 


1 


12 51 


6 4 


^30 


2 


1 28 


7 20 


^13 


3 


2 12 


8 14 


^26 


4 


2 53 


9 11 


S 9 



d(^]). Capella so 9 24 
$ rises 6 4 ^ 

14. Arc. ris. 11 4 
^"'^Aldeb. so. 8 42 
d?]). Spica ris. 12 10 
Orion rises 9 40 
T? souths 7 11 



8 


7 L8 


9 


7 17 


9 


7 17 


10 


7 16 


10 


7 15 


10 


7 14 


11 


7 13 



3] 2d Sunday after Epiphany. John 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 35 min. 



19 Sunday 

20 Mond'y 

21 Tues. 

22 Wed. 

23 Thurs. 

24 Friday 

25 Sat. 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 



Sarah 

F. Sebastian 

Agnes 

Vincent 

Emerenth 

Timothy 

PauVs Conv 



4 


3 32 


10 8 




5 


4 11 


11 3 


^ 5 


6 


4 50 


11 53 


fP*18 


7 


5 32 


morn. 


m 2 


7 


6 19 


12 48 


^16 


8 


7 4 


1 39 


^30 


9 


7 57 


2 42 


^15 



]) in Apogee S 

Regulus souths 1 37 
7- so. 7 28 0ent.^ 
jk22. Sir. so. 10 20 
Spica rises 11 28 
^ Great. Elong. E. 
% souths 12 11 



11 


7 12 


11 


7 11 


11 


7 11 


12 


7 10 


12 


7 9 


12 


7 8 


13 


7 7 



4] 3d Sunday after Epiphany 


Matt. 


8. 


Day's length 9 hours 


5 46 min. 


26 Sunday 


14 


Polycarpus 


9 


8 54 


3 45 


^30 


6^1). 8%Q 


13 


7 6 


4 5 


27 Mond'y 


15 


F. Chrysost. 


10 


9 55 


4 50 


«,15 


$ souths 9 49 ^ 


13 


7 5 


4 5 


28 Tues. 


16 


Charles 


11 


10 56 


5 52 


«29 


^ in Perihelion 


13 


7 4 


4 5 


29 Wed, 


17 


Valerius 


12 


11 55 


6 54 


c^l3 


^dK]).l/sets635 


13 


7 3 


4 5 


30 Thurs. 


18 


Adelgunda 


12 


morn. 


]) rises 


(^27 


^/30. ^ stationary 


14 


7 2 


4 5 


31 Friday 


19 


Virgil 


1 


12 52 


6 48 


^11 




14 


7 1 


4 5 



rvioorvj' 

EASTERN STATES. 
T.a«^t Quarter, 7th, 10 o'clock 27 min. Morn. 
New Moon, 14th, 5 " 21 " Even. 
Frst Quarter, 22(1, <) ' 44 '* " 

Full Moon, 30th, 8 '• 57 " Morn. 



s f>m/vse:s. 

CENTRAL STATES. 
,9 o'clock 47 min. Morn. 
4 " 41 '* Even. 
9 " 04 " 
3 *' 17 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 
9 o'clock 07 min. Mori 
4 '' 01 ♦* Evei 

8 " 24 " 

2 " 37 " Mori 



Jupiter is in opposition with the Sun on the 26th and shines all night. 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 




WEATHER FORECAST. 

1st rain; 2d milder; 3d cloudy; 4th rain or snow; 
;th foggy; 6th wet day; 7th gloomy; Sth change; gth 
now; loth moderating; nth variable; 12th colder; 
3th rain or snow; 14th blustery; 15th milder; i6th 
iisagreeable; 17th wintry, cold; i8th clear, brilliant; 
gth squally; 20th snowflurries; 21st high winds; 22d 
:loudy; 23d snowstorm; 24th change; 25th windy 
j, iay; 26th variable; 27th cloudy; 28th cold dav 29th 

, rain, sleet, snow; 30th colder; 31st warmer. 

{ 

^HE WINTER MONTHS ^J,„^hwa^^ 



nvigorating in North Dakota. The winter air is dry and never 

reduces those shivering and benumbing sensations which 

Tiake life very uncomfortable in the Southern and Eastern 

Ij States. (See page 2 for further information.) 

' '^^'OOD RESOLUTIONS are in order for the New 
Year. Resolve to be merciful to your stock by throwing 
away your barbed wire and building the IMPROVED 
CHAIN-STAY FENCE. (See advertisement on last cover page 

II of Almanac.) 

4 



in 1728, at the age of sixteen. He came to 
Germantown with his father, one year later, 
and (according to Morgan Edwards, Bap- 
tist historian, who wrote in 1770), was or- 
dained elder of the Germantown church in 
1749. If so, he was the elder for over half 
a century. He was truly a ** father in Isra- 
el." He baptized many persons in German- 
town, — he traveled much over the Brother- 
hood, as it then was, organizing churches 
and ordaining elders. It was during his 
earlier ministry that the Brethren changed 
their place of holding meetings from the 
Saur (Sower) residence to the present lo- 
cation. For ten years, from 1760 to 1770, 
they worshiped in a house specially fitted 
for the purpose, but formerly the residence 
of Bro. John Pettikoffer until he went to 
Ephrata. This house (having been the first 
house in upper Germantown) was the home 
for the old and poor of the church, after 
it ceased to be the meeting-house. Here 
they lived, rent free, and were cared for, — 
this was the first Old Folks' Home. In the 



spring of 1770, the present meetinghouse 
was built, — the first one built in America. 
It is said they employed no outside help 
in building, and so well did they do the 
work, that it seems to be good for another 
century. Here there are sacred associations 
and hallowed memories. The table on 
which I write these lines is the one from 
behind which Bro. Mack himself preached 
for more than thirty years, also Bro. Sower 
for some years yet his co-laborer, and many 
faithful brethren following them during 
seventy odd years. In 1803, at the ripe age 
of ninety-one years, he was laid to rest, 
greatly beloved by his people. Let the liv- 
ing be the best monument to the memory of 
the dead. 

Eld. Peter Keyser next followed. H^ 
was born in 1766, was baptized in 1785, and 
elected to the ministry in 1788. He was 
the minister of the church for more than 
fifty years. He was a powerful preacher 
and a most remarkable Scripturian. ** He 
had memorized the whole of the New Tes- 
tament and the greater part of the Old," 
writes Bro. Abram. H. Cassel. He died in 



Germantown church has had few elected 
preachers, considering its age. In the ear- 
liest years several brethren preached or ex- 
horted, but never regularly elected. Such 
were Gommery, Gantz and perhaps two 
Trauts. Later, were several others, among 
them Peter Leibert who preached much, 
and baptized on a number of occasions, but 
we cannot find that he was elected to the min- 
istry, though he probably was.' 

Bro. John Price was elected in 1837, and 
assisted Bro. Keyser many years. Since 
then (in almost sixty years) only two per- 
sons were elected: John Van Lashett and 
Amos Cowell. Philadelphia church being- 
considered a branch of Germantown, for so 
many years, several of her ministers, and 
also deacons, labored here considerable in 
recent years. From the time that Bro. J. 
T. Meyers left, almost twenty years ago, 



2d Month.] 



FEBRUf\RY. 



[Days 29. 



Days & Weeks 






Remarkable 
Days. 



WTO 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 

S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 



Slow Rises & Sets. 

M. H. M. I H. M. 



1 Sat. 1 20 Ignatius 



21 1 45 7 50^25 



11 souths 11 35 ^S14|7 0|5 



5] Septuagesima Sunday. 



Matt. 20. 



Day's length 10 hours 00 min. 



2 Sunday 


21 


Candlemas 


3 


2 36 


8 58 


^5% o 


Algol souths 5 54 


14 


6 59 


5 1 


3 Mond'y 


22 


Blasius 


4 


3 26 


10 1 


^j^^ 21 


$ souths 9 44 


14 


6 58 


5 2 


4 Tues. 


23 


Veronica 


5 


4 16 


11 4 


m, 3 


Orion souths 8 34 


14 


6 57 


5 3 


5 Wed. 


24 


Agatha 


6 


5 7 


morn. 


«14 


|^^5. T^ rises 11 50 


14 


6 56 


5 4 


6 Thurs. 


25 


Dorothea 


7 


6 20 


12 6 


«27 


^dT?]). 6V^1) 


14 


6 54 


5 6 


7 Friday 


26 


Richard 


8 


7 36 


1 11 


m 9 


□ T?0 


14 


6 53 


5 7 


8 Sat. 


27 


Solomon 


9 


8 53 


2 15 


^20 


d?0.?G.Hel.Lat.N. 


14 


6 52 


5 8 



6] Sexagesima Sunday. 



Luke 18. 



Day's length 10 hours 16 min. 



9 Sunday 
10 Mond'y 


28 
29 


11 Tues. 


30 


12 Wed. 


31 


13 Thurs. 


F. 


14 Friday 

15 Sat. 


2 
3 



ApoUonia 

Scholastica 

Euphrosina 

Gilbert 

F. Castor 

Valentine 

Faustin 



10 


9 49 


3 19 


m 2 


11 


10 44 


4 23 


^14 


12 


11 36 


5*30 


^28 


12 


12 10 


6 28 


^ 9 


1 


12 44 


]) sets 


^22 


2 


1 8 


6 31 


as5 5 


3 


1 50 


7 27 


s^is 



6 % $. $ rises 3 10^^ 

d (? D. d ? ]) 

$ rises 5 20 

d?]). Rigel so. 7 25 
,,^ IS.DlitO.OE?^: 
^T? souths 5 34 

Canopus so. 8 37 S 



14 


6 51 


15 


6 50 


15 


6 49 


15 


6 48 


14 


6 46 


14 


6 45 


14 


6 44 



9 
10 
11 
12 
14 
15 
16 



7] QUINQUAGESIMA SUNDAY 



Luke 18. 



Day's length 10 hours 32 min. 



16 Sunday 


4 


17 Mond'y 


5 


18 Tues. 


6 


19 Wed. 


7 


20 Thurs. 


8 


21 Friday 


9 


22 Sat. 


10 



Julianus 
Constantia 
Shrove TiHy 
Ash Wedn, 
Eucharius 
Eleonora 

Washington 
born. 



3 


2 8 


8 12 


9^. 2 


4 


2 47 


9 10 


Pf*15 


5 


3 28 


10 4 


^^29 


6 


4 11 


10 53 


^13 


6 


4 56 


11 49 


^27 


7 


5 46 


morn. 


**11 


7 


6 40 


12 14 


^,26 



J) in Apogee 
Andromeda s. 9 54 
Regulus souths 11 54 
Cap. so. 6 56.0^e?^S^ 
§ stationary 
ik21. Pol. so. 9 28 
PdW2)-Sp.r. 9 29 



14 


6 43 


14 


6 41 


14 


6 40 


14 


6 39 


14 


6 38 


14 


6 36 


14 


6 35 



17 
19 
20 
21 
22 
24 
25 



8] 1st Sunday in Lent. 



Matt. 4. 



Day's length 10 hours 50 min. 



23 Sunday 


11 


24 Mond'y 


12 


25 Tues. 


13 


26 Wed. 


14 


27 Thurs. 


15 


28 Friday 


16 


29 Sat. 


17 



Serenus 

St. Matthew 

Victorinus 

Emherday 

Leander 

Romanus 

Leap Day 



8 


7 37 


1 22 


vglO 


9 


8 36 


2 26 


^'€24 


10 


9 36 


3 38 


^^: 4 


11 


10 33 


4 32 


^14 


12 


11 28 


5 42 


^^29 


12 


morn. 


]) rises 


^13 


1 


12 21 


6 40 


^24 



$ souths 9 30 f^ 

t|J stationary 
6%1)> % sets 3 24 
y^ Stat. l^C Stat. $inS 
% souths 9 41 
J|^28. ])Eclip.Liv. 
]) in Peris:ee S 



14 


6 34 


14 


6 32 


13 


6 31 


13 


6 30 


13 


6 29 


13 


6 27 


13 


6 26 



26 
28 
29 
30 
31 
33 
34 



IVIOOIM'S PHASES. 



EASTERN STATES. 

Last Quarter, 5th, 7 o'clock 40 min. Even. 
New Moon, 13tli, 11 " 14 " Morn. 
First Quarter, 21st, 4 " 16 " Even. 
Full Moon, 28th, 2 " 53 " 



CENTRAL STATES. 

7 o'clock 00 min. Even. 
10 " 34 " Morn. 
3 " 36 " Even. 
2 " 13 " " 



WESTERN STATES. 

6 o'clock 20 min. Even. 

9 " 54 " Morn. 

2 '' 56 " Even. 
1 " 33 " 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



II 




WEATHER FORECAST. 



1st frosty, cold; 2d clouds; 3d dark, cloudy, snow; 
ti damp, rainy; 5th moderating; 6th cloudy, rainy; 
h colder; 8th rain or snow; Qth clearing; loth 
ange; nth fair, frosty; 12th cloudy, dull; 13th dark, 
ill, cloudy; 14th windy; 15th milder; i6th fine day; 
th pleasant, quiet; i8th cloudy; 19th mild; 20th 
mial weather; 21st fair; 22d fine weather; 23d 
r; 24th fine weather; 25th cloudy, dull; 26th clouds, 
ndy; 27th warmer; 28th clouds; 2gth changeable. 



ERO WEATHER. 



The dryness of the winter 
air in North Dakota ex- 
lins the ease with which homes can be kept warm without the 
aring fire so necessary in the East and South, where rain, fog, 
n, sleet, mud and change is the record of half the year. (See 
ge 2 for further particulars.) 



^ROUND-HOG DAY is not too soon for the farmer to 

U begin to plan for spring fencing. Any farmer can build 
the IMPROVED CHAIN-STAY FENCE, so simple is it 
construction. (See advertisement on last cover page of this 
manac.) 



le church has had no resident minister un- 
1 the coming of Bro. W. B. Stover in 1892. 

* I must be pardoned for passing so rap- 
ily over the recent history, and be permit- 
sd to say that the discussion of the present 
ould not be history, however much it is 
ae theme of my life and the burden of my 
eart. I have written a very incomplete 
ketch. If the Lord can use it to the stim- 
lation of greater interest in the mother 
hurch, to the development of a higher ap- 
preciation for the richness of the inheritance 

hich we have received, and to the realiza- 
lon of the fulness of faith that He is not 
lack concerning His promises, — then 

5LESSED BE HIS NAMe! 

G. N. Falkenstein. 
661 1 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 



*The church was supplied in various ways, and for a consider- 
ble time by the Mission Board of Eastern Pennsylvania. 



The world is a workshop, and none but 
he wise know how to use the tools. 



EAT APPLES. 



The Practitioner says apples have many 
good medicinal qualities. Chemically they 
are composed of vegetable fiber, albumen, 
sugar, gum, chlorophyl, malic acid, gallic 
acid, lime and much water. Furthermore, 
the German analysts say that the apple con- 
tains a larger percentage of phosphorus 
than any other fruit or vegetable. The 
phosphorus is admirably adapted to renew- 
ing the essential nervous matter of the brain 
and the spinal cord. It is, perhaps, for the 
same reason, rudely understood, that old 
Scandinavian traditions represent the apple 
as the food of the gods, who, when they 
felt themselves to be growing feeble and 
infirm, resorted to this fruit, renewing their 
powers of mind and body. 

The acids of the apple are of singular use 
for men of sedentary habits, whose livers 
are sluggish in action, those acids serving to 
eliminate from the body noxious matters, 
which, if retained, would make the brain 
heavy and dull, or bring about jaundice or 
skin eruptions and other allied troubles. 
Some such experience must have led to the 
custom of taking apple sauce with roast 
pork, rich goose, and other like dishes. 
The malic acid of ripe apples, either raw or 
cooked, will neutralize any excess of chalky 
matter engendered by eating too much meat. 

It is also a fact that such fruits as the 
apple, the pear, and the plum, when taken 
ripe and without sugar, diminish acidity in 
the stomach rather than provoke it. Their 
vegetable sauces and juices are converted 
into alkaline carbonates by the chemical 
action of the stomach juices, which tend to 
counteract acidity. — Scientific American. 



Eld. John Herr, of Myerstown, Leba- 
non Co., Pa., says: ** I used Chamberlain's 
Colic, Cholera and Diarrhoea Remedy sev- 
eral times for colic and diarrhoea. It gave 
almost instant relief. I appreciate the rem- 
edy." 



3d Month.] 



MflRGH 



[Days 31, 



Days & Weeks 21 



Remarkable 
Days. 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 



ftspects Of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 



sxj3sr 
Rises & Sets. 
H. M. I H. M. 



9] 2d Sunday in Lent. 



Matt. 15. 



Day's length 11 hours 08 min. 



1 Sunday 


18 


2 Mond'y 


19 


3 Tues. 


20 


4 Wed. 


21 


5 Thurs. 


22 


6 Friday 


23 


7 Sat. 


24 



St. David 

Simplicius 

Samuel 

Adrian 

Frederick 

Fridolin 

Perpetua 



2 


1 13 


7 39 


)^^ o 


3 


2 5 


8 41 


^16 


4 


2 57 


9 40 


^5% 28 


4 


3 52 


10 32 


«io 


5 


4 49 


11 26 


«22 


B 


5 47 


morn. 


m 4 


7 


6 44 


12 18 


#J16 



Sirius sets 9 10 ^ 
? in S- Rig. so. 6 27 
7* sets 8 24 

6 'hi)' 6y^l) 

ng;©. t^G.E.W. 
6. Spicaris. 8 44 
11 souths 9 3 



12 


6 25 


12 


6 23 


12 


6 22 


12 


6 20 


12 


6 19 


11 


6 17 


11 


6 16 



35 
37 
38 
4C 
41 
43 
44 



10] 3d Sunday in Lent. 



Luke 11. 



Day's length 11 hours 28 min. 



8 Sunday 


25 


9 Mond'y 


26 


10 Tues. 


27 


11 Wed. 


28 


12 Thurs. 


29 


13 Friday 


M 


14 Sat. 


2 



Philemon 

Prudence 

Apollonius 

Ernestus 

Gregory 

Macedon 

Zachariah 



8 


7 40 


1 6 


^28 


9 


8 33 


1 52 


^10 


10 


9 22 


2 48 


^23 


1110 7 


3 30 


fh^ 


12:10 49 


4 32 


^18 


12 11 29 


5 33 


"^ 1 


1112 8 


2) sets 


^14 



Orion rises 9 10 ^ 

5 rises 2 4 

6 Si) 

c5 $ 3). 6 ^D 
^ in Aphelion 
? rises 3 40 

,^iPl4. 3)i. Apog.a 



11 


6 14 


11 


6 13 


10 


6 12 


10 


6 10 


10 


6 9 


10 


6 7 


9 


6 6 



46 
47 
48 
5C 
51 
53 
54 



11] 4th Sunday in Lent. 



John 6. 



Day's length 11 hours 48 min. 



15 Sunday 


3 


16 Mond'y 


4 


17 Tues. 


5 


18 Wed. 


6 


19 Thurs. 


7 


20 Friday 


8 


21 Sat. 


9 



Christopher 

Cyprianus 

St. Pat/rick 

Anshelmus 

Josephus 

Matrona 

Benedictus 



2 


12 47 


7 19 


S^27 


2 


1 27 


8 30 


^11 


3 


2 9 


9 34 


f?*25 


4 


3 41 


10 29 


^ 9 


5 


4 32 


11 22 


^24 


6 


5 27 


morn. 


^ 9 


7 


6 24 


12 15 


^23 



$ souths 9 13 

Procyon sets 10 19 

Castor souths 7 49 

Librae souths 10 58 

©ent. 

Rigel rises 10 44 



Day & night eq'l 
Spring begins 



9 


6 5 


9 


6 3 


8 


6 2 


8 


6 1 


8 


6 


7 


5 59 


7 


5 58 



5£ 
5'J 
58 
5^ 
C 
1 



12] 5th Sunday in Lent. 



John 8. 



Day's length 12 hours 04 min. 



22 Sunday 


10 


Paulina 


8 


7 21 


1 22 


m 7 


^^22. Reg. so. 9 53 
v^ Insets 3 12 


7 


5 57 


6 ^ 


23 Mond'y 


11 


Eberhard 


9 


8 17 


2 19 


«21 


7 


5 56 


6 4 


24 Tues. 


12 


Gabriel 


10 


9 12 


3 10 


** 4 


6 711). li stationary 


6 


5 54 


6 ( 


25 Wed. 


13 


Ann. V. M. 


11 


10 5 


3 50 


^18 


Sirius souths 6 25 


6 


5 53 


6 'i 


26 Thurs. 


14 


Emmanuel 


11 


10 57 


4 19 


^ 2 


7-'' sets 10 52 


6 


5 52 


6 i 


27 Friday 


15 


Gustavus 


12 


11 38 


4 46 


^15 


Orion sets 11 30 


5 


5 50 


6 1( 


28 Sat. 


16 


Gideon 


12 


11 58 


5 15 


^28 


2) in Perigee 


5 


5 49 


6 11 


13] Palm Sunday. 


Matt. 21. Day's length 12 hours 22 min. 


29 Sunday 


17 


Eustatius 


1 


morn. 


2) rises 


J5^ 11 


^^29. 11 so. 7 35 


5 


5 48 


6 1^. 


30 Mond'y 


18 


Guide 


2 


12 41 


7 48 


^24 


^^h rises 7 50 


4 


5 47 


6 1^ 


31 Tues. 


19 


Detlaus 


2 


1 37 


8 49 


m. 6 


dT?]). Androm. s. 7 26 


4 


5 45 


6 1^ 




IS/IOOIVJ'S PHASES. 


EASTERN STATES. 


CENTRAL STATES. WESTERN STATES. 


Last Quarter, 6th, 6 o'clock 31 m 


in. Morn. 5 o'clock 51 min. Morn. 5 o'clock 11 min. Morn 


New Moon, 14th, 5 " 60 ' 


5 " 10 '' " 4 " 30 " 


First Quarter, 22d, 6 " 59 * 


i u 6 " 19 " " 5 " 39 " " 


VuU Moon, 


20 1 1 


,19 <» Ol 




" 2i 


Jth,li 


" 43 


" Even. 11 " 


05 


) " 


Even 



^ 

^ 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 




WEATHER FORECAST. 

[St threatening; 2d change; 3d warmer; 4th thun- 
4' r; 5th colder; 6th cfear, bright; 7th fair; 8th clouds; 

41 1 rain or snow; loth rainy, slushy; nth dull, rainy 

42 y; 1 2th rough and stormy; 13th windy; 14th cloudy; 
th changeable; i6th unsettled; 17th blustery; 1 8th 

derate; igth gloomy day; 20th wind; 21st rough; 
d cloudy; 23d cloudy, squally; 24th snowstorms; 

h colder; 26th cloudy; 27th rainy; 28th thunder; 
th blustery; 30th clearing; 31st frosty, cool. 



%\ 



gland, New York and Ontario. Spring opens in March ; seed- 
: of grain begins in April ; harvesting of grain in August. (See 
IQ 2 for other information.) 



HE SEASONS ^^ ^^'^^^ Dakota do not differ 
. . . materially from those of New 



55 



• HE MARCH of civilization is indicated by the intro- 
duction of the IMPROVED CHAIN-STAY SMOOTH- 
WIRE FENCE. It has come to stay. It can be made any 

ght, any strength. (See advertisement on last cover page of 

s Almanac.) 



5| OUR SUNDAY SCHOOL WORK. 

5( 
We can scarcely overestimate the good 

ifluences which go out from our Sunday 

:hools. And yet there is so much room 

)r improvement that I embrace this op- 

-ortunity for encouraging us to struggle on 
)ward better results. Hundreds of our 
unday schools are failures compared with 
le best we have, and these *'best" might 
e made much better than they now are.. 
Before we make a great deal of real prog- 
ss, we must answer this question: Why do 
^eek-day schools prosper best in winter 
^hile many Sunday schools close with the 
pproach of autumn frosts? Why heat 

ifcould be unfavorable to the success of one 

IJdnd of school and cold unfavorable to the 
)ther, is not clear to me. 

Another question: Why are we so long 
earning and yet know so little? The boy 

™ vho has the first reader this year will likely 
lave the second reader next year and the 
hird the next year, and so on. By and by 
le gets a good education. It is not always 



so with those who attend Sunday school. 
Paul wrote to certain brethren, saying, 
"When ye ought to be teachers, ye have 
need that one teach you." Is not this the 
condition of many of us? Some of us at- 
tend Sunday school for many years, and 
still gain little more than a smattering and 
confused knowledge of a few simple facts. 
We ought to gain something that we clear- 
ly understand and definitely remember. 
Many of us ought to have passed already 
the " milk " stage of spiritual food and now 
be ready for '' strong meat." But instead 
of this, like real babes, we must still be fed 
with " milk." 

I repeat the question, Why have we 
learned so little? We have finished, recent- 
ly, a whole year's study on the Life of 
Christ. It might reasonably be expected 
that we should now know the leading facts 
of that life, just as a boy completes his 
geography or history. Of the meaning of 
all those facts, we shall never get done 
learning. If we do not now have a pretty 
clear view of the Life of Christ, as he went 
to and fro in the land of Palestine, we have 
lost one of the best opportunities of a life 
time. Probably never before were there so 
many studying the life of our Lord for a 
whole year at a time. We shall have anoth- 
er very good opportunity, beginning Janu- 
ary, 1896, and continuing through June. 
During this time the lessons will be on the 
Life of Christ as given by Luke. If we 
have let the former chance go by unim- 
proved, let us resolve to make the most of 
this. I pity those Sunday schools which 
hibernate during the winter months and 
thus break up these well-arranged Sunday 
school courses. 

One thing we need is more hustling Sun- 
day school teachers who are ambitious to 
prove themselves workmen that need not 
be ashamed. One need not know so much 
to be such a teacher, but he must show to 
his class that he is striving manfully to 
learn. If he show such a disposition for a 



4tli Month.] 



f\PRIL. 



[Days 30. 



Days & Weeks 






Remarkabie 
Days. 






H. 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 



flspects Of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 



Rises & Sets 
H. M. I H. M 



1 Wed. 

2 Thurs. 

3 Friday 

4 Sat. 



20 
21 
22 
23 



Theodore 
Maundy T. 
Good Frid. 
Ambrosius 



2 34 

3 34 

4 34 

5 33 



9 46 

10 40 

11 32 
morn. 



«18 
«30 

S^24 



6Vf^. s in Aphel. f^ 
? Gr. Hel. Lat. S. 
7* sets 7 20 
4. Tj so. 2 9 *-' 



4 


5 44 


4 


5 43 


3 


5 41 


3 


5 40 



6 1( 

6 1^ 

6 W 

6 2( 



14-] Easter Sunday. 



Mark 16. 



Day's length IB hours 40 min. 



5 Sunday 


24 


Easter Sun. 


7 


6 28 


12 30 


m 6 


Sirius sets 10 40 


3 


5 39 


6 2: 


6 Mond'y 


25 


Easter Mon. 


8 


7 19 


1 32 


^18 


Eegulus souths 8 59 


2 


5 37 


6 21 


7 Tues. 


26 


Egesippus 


9 


8 5 


2 22 


^30 


6 $1) 


2 


5 36 


6 2^ 


8 Wed. 


27 


Dyonisius 


10 


8 48 


2 49 


^13 


$ rises 2 26 


2 


5 35 


6 21 


9 Thurs. 


28 


Prochorus 


10 


9 29 


3 18 


^26 


Orion sets 11 4 


1 


5 33 


6 2^ 


10 Friday 


29 


Daniel 


11 


10 36 


3 47 




]) in Apogee. c5?3 ffi 


1 


5 32 


6 21 


11 Sat. 


30 


Julius 


12 


11 26 


4 44 


s;^22 


? rises 3 32 


1 


5 31 


6 2< 



15] 1st Sunday after Easter. 



John 20. 



Day's length 12 hours 58 min. 



12 Sunday 

13 Mond'y 

14 Tues. 

15 Wed. 

16 Thurs. 

17 Friday 

18 Sat. 



31 
A 

2 
3 
4 

5 



Eustachius 

Justinus 

Tiburtius 

Olympia 

Calixtus 

Rudolph 

^neas 



1 


12 8 


]) sets 


ff« 5 


2 


12 51 


8 1 


f?*19 


2 


1 15 


8 37 


m. 4 


3 


1 58 


9 4 


^19 


4 


2 28 


10 19 


^ 4 


4 


3 22 


11 30 


7f»19 


5 


4 17 


morn. 


« 3 



/f|mi2. d ? ]) 
^lipVega so. 1 12 
Spica rises 8 15 
% souths 6 31 
7^* sets 9 34 

d?0 ' 



1 


5 29 


1 


5 28 


1^ 


5 27 


^ 


5 26 


1 


5 25 


1 


5 24 


1 


5 22 



3: 

3! 

3: 

3^ 
31 
3( 
31 



16] 2d Sunday after Easter. 



John 10. 



Day's length 13 hours 16 min. 



19 Sunday 


7 


20 Mond'y 


8 


21 Tues. 


9 


22 Wed. 


10 


23 Thurs. 


11 


24 Friday 


12 


25 Sat. 


13 



Amcetus 

Sulpitius 

Adularius 

Cajus 

St George 

Albert 

MarhEvan, 



6 


5 14 


12 31 


«17 


7 


6 9 


1 23 


^ 1 


8 


7 2 


2 1 


^15 


9 


7 53 


2 34 


*r29 


10 


8 44 


3 2 


^12 


10 


9 34 


3 29 


^25 


11 


10 25 


4 4 


m 8 



D 7^ ©. 1| sets 1 50 

||20. 6%D 

_P?i.ffi. ©enters^ 
Arcturus souths 12 9 
Aldebaran sets 9 18 
?Gr.Hel.Lat. S. S 
5 in Perihelion 



21 
19 
18 
17 
16 
15 
14 



31 

4: 

4: 

4; 

4^ 

6 41 
6 4< 



17] 3d Sunday after Easter 



John 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 32 min. 



26 Sunday 


14 


Cletus 


12 


11 19 


4 20 


^20 


]) in Perigee 


2 


5 13 


6 4' 


27 Mond'y 


15 


Anastasius 


12 


morn. 


]) ris. 


« 2 


^rA|27.Alphac.s. i9 


3 


5 12 


6 41 


28 Tues. 


16 


Vitalis 


1 


12 15 


7 49 


«15 


Wd T? ]). d lit ]) 


3 


5 10 


6 5( 


29 Wed. 


17 


Sybilla 


2 


1 15 


8 48 


«27 


Tp sets 1 42 


3 


5 9 


6 5- 


30 Thurs. 


18 


Eutropius 


3 


2 17 


9 46 


^ 9 


S souths 8 26 


3 


5 8 


6 5i 



IVIOOIM'S F^MASeS. 



EASTERN STATES. 

Last Quarter, 4th, 7 o'clock 26 min. Even. 

New Moon, 12th, 11 " 25 " 

First Quarter, 20th, 5 " 49 " 

Full Moon, 27th. 8 " 49 " Morn. 



CENTRAL STATES. 

6 o'clock 46 min. Even. 
10 " 45 " 
5 " 09 " 
8 " 09 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 

6 o'clock 06 min. Even 
10 " 05 " 

4 " 29 " " 

7 *♦ 29 " Morn 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



15 



CJN 
iH,l 




2 



WEATHER FORECAST. 

ist cooler; 2d fine day; 3d windy; 4th unsettled; 
5th warmer; 6th thunder; 7th high winds; 8th show- 
ers; Qth frosty, cool; loth showers; nth clearing; 12th 
clouds; 13th bright day; 14th warm; 15th pleasant; 
i6th strong winds; 17th windy day; i8th threatening; 
igth summerlike; 20th rain; 21st cloudy; 22d threat- 
ening; 23d unsettled; 24th variable; 25th rainy day; 
26th thunder; 27th very warm; 28th change; 29th 
cool; 30th showers. 



'T'l-ipj VAI IJPS The following shows the value per 
\ capita of the four staple crops of 



wheat, corn, oats and flax, as well as the per capita value of farm 
animals in the states named last year : 



THE STAPLE CROPS. 

North Dakota $120.00 

South Dakota 92.00 

Kansas 66.00 

Nebraska 58.00 

Iowa 49-.SO 



LIVE STOCK. 

Iowa $116.66 

North Dakota 114.38 

South Dakota 96.35 

Nebraska 9^-33 

Kansas ^ 89.41 



41 



The income from field crops gives North Dakota a larger 
average to each man, woman and child, than any other agricul- 
tural State in the Union. (See page 2 for more information.) 

YOU FEEL YOUNG AGAIN as spring approaches, 
but you will not live long enough to outlive the IM- 
PROVED CHAIN-STAY SMOOTH-WIRE FENCE. It 
doesn't wear out. (See advertisement on last cover page of this 
Almanac.) 

few years, the question of qualification, so 
far as knowledge is concerned, will soon 
take care of itself. The successful teacher 
will study, not simply the lesson matter, 
but he will read up the connecting events 
and master the geography and history con- 
nected with the lesson. 

I repeat and emphasize the thought that 
we do not remember enough of the matter 
of our Sunday school lessons. We should 
thoroughly master it and make it a perma- 
nent acquisition, — a veritable part of our- 
selves. To attain this most desirable end, 
I suggest the plan of conducting examina- 
tions as a helpful means. Very few of us 
are so nearly perfect that we do not need 
this as a goad to urge us to better work. 
The writer knows from experience and ob- 
servation the value of examinations for 
this purpose. The boys and girls are ac- 



customed to take examination in the week- 
day schools; why not in the Sunday schools, 
also? Let the examination be conducted 
by the Superintendent just after each quar- 
terly review. The questions should be pre- 
pared in different grades. Let the Superin- 
intendent get up neat certificates to be 
issued to those who pass the examination 
satisfactorily. The certificate of each pupil 
should be signed by his teacher and by the 
Superintendent. 

{Form of Certificate). 

VICTOR brethren's SUNDAY SCHOOL. 

This is to certify that 

has passed a satisfactory examination 

on the International Sunday School Lessons, 

quarter, 189 

Teacher. 

Superintendent. 

Grade. 

The post-office address of the Superin- 
tendent, or the post-office nearest the Sun- 
day school, may be placed below the name 
of the Sunday school. The blank before 
the word grade should be filled by writing 
Infant, Primary, Intermediate, or Bible. 
Each pupil's work should be graded on a 
scale of 100 and the grade placed on the 
back of his certificate. C. E. Arnold. 



ELDER BEELMAN RECOMMENDS CHAM= 
BERLAIN'S REMEDY. 



Last summer, during harvest time, a man hy the 
name of Mackay (who is himself a medicine agent 
for a cholera and diarrhoea remedy) took a very 
severe attack of diarrhoea while here. We had no 
other suitable medicine in the house so he said he 
would try Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and Diar- 
rhoea Remedy. After taking one dose he felt great 
relief and after taking three doses, according to the 
directions, he was entirely cured and has had no 
attack since. He says it is the most pleasant medi- 
cine to take and did him more good than anything 
he had ever before tried. We can recommend it as 
being a very good remedy for diarrhoea. — Henry 
Beelman, Dillsburg, York Co., Pa. 

For sale, at 25 cents per bottle, by drug- 
gists and merchants. 



5th Month.] 



MflY. 



[Days 31. 



Daijs & Weeks 



HO 



Remarkable 
Daijs. 






MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

vises & Sets, 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 

S D. 



ftspects o! Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 1 H. M. 



1 Frid. 

2 Sat. 



19 

20 



Sigismiiiid 



3 19 

4 17 



10 41 

11 32 



^21 



If souths 5 34 
Sirius sets 9 6 






5 7 
5 6 



6 53 
6 54 



13] 4th Sunday after Easter. John 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 48 min. 



3 Sunday 

4 Mond'y 

5 Tues. 

6 A¥ed. 

7 Thurs. 

8 Friday 

9 Sat. 



21 livo.ofCrosH 

22 Florianus 

23 Godard 

2 4: John Evan. 

25 Domi cilia 

26 Stanislaus 

27 Job 



6 


5 11 


morn. 


^14 


7 


6 


12 10 


^27 


8 


6 47 


12 46 


fh y 


8 


7 27 


1 15 


^21 


9 


8 7 


2 6 


3^ 3 


10 


8 46 


2 28 


^16 


10 


9 25 


3 6 


1^:^29 



7* sets 8 24 

4.Spicaso. 1034 

^ Gr. Hel. Lat N. 

6 $1) S 

3) in Apogee 

$ rises 2 14 



3 


5 5 


3 


5 4 


4 


5 3 


4 


5 2 


4 


5 1 


4 


5 


4 


4 59 



6 55 

6 56 



57 

58 

59 



1 



19] 5tii Sunday after Easter. John 16. 



Day's length 14 hours 02 min. 



10 Sunday 


28 


Gordianus 


11 


10 40 


3 28 


^13 


$ rises 3 23 


4 


4 58 


7 


2 


11 Monday 


29 


Mamertus 


12 


11 35 


3 50 


f?*28 


d $ ]) 


4 


4 57 


7 


3 


12 Tues. 


30 


Pancratius 


12 


12 14 


2) sets 


^13 


Mii2. 8^Q 


4 


4 56 


7 


4 


13 Wed. 


M 


Servatius 


1 


12 48 


9 24 


^28 


HP Arc. so. 10 48 


4 


4 55 


7 


5 


14 Thurs. 


2 


Ascension 


2 


1 27 


10 29 


^13 


d ? 3). d W 3) 


4 


4 54 


7 


6 


15 Friday 


3 


Sophia 


3 


2 13 


10 58 


^28 


d?t|; n 


4 


4 53 


7 


7 


16 Sat. 


4 


Peregrina 


4 


3 9 


11 22 


«13 


? Gr. Elong. E. 


4 


4 52 


7 


8 



20] 6Tn Sunday after Easter. John 15. 



Day's length 14 hours 16 min. 



17 Sunday 


5 


18 Mond'y 


6 


19 Tues. 


7 


20 Wed. 


8 


21 Thurs. 


9 


22 Friday 


10 


23 Sat. 


11 



Venantius 

Liborius 

Potentia 

Torpetus 

Prudence 

Helena 

Desiderius 



5 


4 5 


morn. 


>^€27 


6 


4 58 


12 


^11 


7 


5 49 


12 36 


^25 


7 


6 38 


1 9 


M 9 


8 


7 26 


1 38 


^22 


9 


8 25 


2 6 


S% ^j 


10 


9 26 


2 36 


^l'^' 



li sets 12 2 

dlf 3) 

$ Gr. Hel. Lat. S. 
1k20. Ant. ris. ^ 
P'Rig. sets 9 41 

Or. s. 10 12 O-;^ 

T? souths 10 43 



4 


4 51 


4 


4 50 


4 


4 49 


4 


4 48 


4 


4 48 


4 


4 47 


4 


4 46 



9 
10 
11 
12 
12 
13 
14 



21] Whitsuntide. 



Joim 14. 



Day's length 14 hours 28 min. 



24 Sunday 


12 


25 Mond'y 


13 


26 Tues. 


14 


27 Wed. 


15 


28 Tliurs. 


16 


29 Friday 


17 


30 Sat. 


18 



WJiit Sun. 

WJiit Mon. 

Beda 

Emherday 

William 

Sybilla 

Wigand 



11 


10 57 


3 


2^29 


12 


11 58 


3 26 


^12 


12 


morn. 


3) rises 


«24 


1 


12 51 


8 32 


m 6 


2 


1 


9 13 


^18 


3 


2 2 


9 54 


^^30 


4 


2 59 


10 18 


^12 



Perigee 

d lit 3) 
26. T? sets 2 32 
Regulus s. 12 27 

Spica souths 9 8 

5 stationary 

Sirius sets 9 14 




3 


4 45 


3 


4 45 


3 


4 44 


3 


4 43 


3 


4 43 


3 


4-42 


3 


4 41 



15 
15 
16 
17 
17 
18 
19 



22] Trinity Sunday. 



John 3. 



Day's length 14 hours 38 min. 



31 Sunday 1 19|Mauilius | 5| 3 51|10 45|^24ic? souths 7 "51 ^j 3!4 41|7 19 



KASTERN STATES. 


CENTRAL STATES. 


WESTERN STATES. 


Last Quarter, 4ih, 10 o'clock 27 min. Morn. 
New Moon, I2th, 2 " 48 *' Even. 
First Qmrter, 20th, 1 '• 23 " Morn. 
FullM). n, 2r)th, 4 " 58 " Kven. 


9 o'clock 47 min. Morn. 

2 " 08 " Even. 

12 " 43 " Morn. 

4 " 18 " Even. 


9 o'clock 07 min. Morn. 

1 " 28 " Even. 

12 " 03 " Morn. 

3 " 38 " Even. 



Saturn is in opposition with the Sun on the 5th and shines all night. 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



17 




WEATHER FORECAST. 

St cool; 2d clear; 3d warm day; 4th sultry; 5th 
ar; 6th murky; 7th clouds; 8th thunder shower; 
windy; loth change; nth clouds, rain; 12th thun- 
, hail; 13th changeable; 14th clouds; 15th thunder 
wers; i6th variable; 17th very warm; l8th cloudy, 
1; 19th windy; 20th clouds; 21st unsettled; 22d 
wery; 23d change; 24th damp; 25th thunder show- 
26th fog, cooler; 27th showery; 28th thunder 
rm; 29th cloudy; 30th hot day; 31st unsettled. 



HAS North Dakota has a sky as blue as that over 
' Italy, as bright with stars at night as that over 



Idean plains, which gave birth to astronomy ; it has a summer 
:hat never depresses ; a winter air that invigorates but never 
Is or gives a man the shivers ; it never has the long spells of 
erable muddy roads common to the Eastern and Southern 
tes. (See page 2 for information of interest to home-seekers.) 



S THE GRASS BEGINS TO GROW the 

stock will want to reach across and ride down your fence. 
The new IMPROVED CHAIN-STAY FENCE has double 
le at top and bottom. Absolutely cattle proof. (See adver- 
ent on last cover page of this Almanac.) 



HOW TO GROW PEACHES. 



When but a small boy I saw, time and 
ain, a large and fruitful peach tree beside 
e State Road in Pike County, Ohio, of 
lich my father said, " I saw peaches on 
at tree forty years ago," yet no one 
emed to care why that one tree should 
^e so long and do so well. 
But I thought of it often, and wondered 

to the reason of its long life, until in 
89, and long after my father and the tree 
id both passed away, the thought occurred 

me that the cause of its long life was no 
•eat secret after all, for it was plain and for 
1 there to see. 

It had stood at the north end of an old 
oneer cabin and beside the stick and clay 
limney, and these as they crumbled down 
id formed a mound of a foot or more 
•ound the body and root of this old plo- 
ver tree. This was the secret and for the 
st six years I have put the thought into 



practice, and I see that all trees, thus pro- 
tected, are strong and thrifty, and some 
have fruit this year, while a few that were 
neglected are failing and one is dead. 

Hence I say, To secure long life for your 
trees, see first that all borers are removed 
from the root and tree near the ground; then 
hill them up with clay dirt, at least eight 
inches above the crown of the root, and 
this mound will keep that part of the tree 
both warm and dry,, besides protecting it 
from its worst enemy, the borer. 

To secure crops yearly, provide a pro- 
tection on the north and west from the cold 
winds, and plant all new orchards, so that 
they have, if possible, wood-land on the 
north and west to protect from the cold 
blasts of winter. 

To secure good and large fruit, trim off, 
in July or August, all the water sprouts and 
needless branches, and cut back the year's 
growth at least one-third, which will make 
stronger and healthier buds, and better fruit, 
in the next year's crop. Landon West. 



PETRA. 

We here present a good illustration of 
the wonderful ruin to be found at Petra, in 
the " desert of Edom," not far from Mount 
Hor, where Aaron, the brother of Moses 
died and was buried. It is in the very heart 
of the country made sacred by the wander- 
ings of the Israelites. In entering Petra the 
traveler follows an extraordinary ravine, 
called the Sek. This grows more and more 
narrow as the traveler proceeds until, in 
some places, the ravine is only twelve feet 
wide, while on either hand the rocky walls 
tower to a height of three hundred feet. 
Scarce a ray of light pierces this gloomy 
defile; yet this was once the great road to 
Petra. All along the rocky walls are cave- 
tombs hewn out of the solid stone. The 
traveler enters Petra through the ruins of 
a great gate. He then finds himself in an 
irregular valley, surrounded on all sides by 
the rugged mountains. And now he dis- 



6th Month.] 



JUNE. 



[Days 30. 



Days & Weeks 



3- 



Remarkable 
Days. 



^3: 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets, 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 

S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanij. 



sxjisr I 
Rises & Sets] 

H. M. I H. m: 



Mond'y 

Tues. 

Wed. 

Thurs. 

Friday 

Sat. 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



Nicodemus 

Marcellus 

Erasmus 

Corpus Chr. 

Bonifacius 

Artemius 



39 

23 

4 

43 

22 
2 



11 12 

11 35 
morn. 

12 5 
12 30 

1 



^30 
^12 
-25 



Arcturus so. 9 33 ^ 
Spica souths 8 35 
3. T? so. 10 1 a 
S rises 1 52 
]) in Apogee, d (^ ]) 
Regulus sets 11 42 



40 
40 
39 
39 

38 
38 



21 
2( 
2] 
21 

9S. 



23] 1st Sunday after Trinity. Luke 16. 



Day's length 14 hours 44 min. 



7 Sunday 


26 


8 Mond'y 


27 


9 Tues. 


28 


10 Wed. 


29 


11 Thurs. 


30 


12 Friday 


31 


13 Sat. 


J. 



Lucretia 

Medardus 

Barnimus 

Flavins 

Barnabas 

Basilides 

Tobias 



10 


8 44 


1 26 


frf22 


10 


9 29 


2 2 


^ 6 


11 


10 18 


2 28 


^21 


12 


11 10 


3 7 


^ 6 


1 


12 6 


]) sets 


*^21 


2 


1 3 


9 1 


m 6 


3 


1 59 


9 42 


«2i 



6j^ Q 

^ in Aphelion 

$ rises 3 4 

d?0lnferior. d?]) 

11. 6^1) 

S in Perihel. ^ 
Alphacca souths 10 1 





4 37 




4 37 




4 37 




4 37 




4 36 




4 36 
4 36 



2? 

re 

2A 
24 
24 



24-] 2d Sunday after Trinity. Luke 14. 



Day's length 14 hours 48 min. 



14 Sunday 

15 Mond'y 

16 Tues. 

17 Wed. 

18 Thurs. 

19 Friday 

20 Sat. 



Helisius 

Vitus 

Rolandus 

St. Albans 

Arnolphus 

Gervasius 

Sylvarius 



3 


2 54 


10 31 


^ 6 


4 


3 46 


11 


^21 


5 


4 35 


11 26 


^i 5 


6 


5 23 


11 48 


^18 


7 


6 11 


morn. 


^ 1 


8 


T 0, 


12 12 


^14 


9 


7 50 


12 34 


)^^ 2o 



d ? ?. 6 2^ 

% sets 11 53 

Vega so. 12 58 £ 

18. S so. 7 29 

? in S 
2)i.Per.^Sir'01^-^« 






4 36 





4 35 





4 35 





4 35 


1 


4 35 


1 


4 35 


1 


4 34 



2^ 
2£ 

21 
21 
2£ 
2£ 
26 



25] 3d Sunday after Trinity. 


Lake 15. 


Day's length 14 hoars 52 min. 


21 Sunday 


9 


Raphael 


9 


8 45 


1 20 


« 9 


d T^ 3). Bummer begins. 


1 


4 35 


7 2^ 


22 Mond'y 


10 


Achatius 


10 


9 44 


1 49 


«21 


d IJt J). ^ stationary 


2 


4 35 


7 2£ 


23 Tues. 


11 


Agrippina 


11 


10 45 


2 27 


m 3 


T? sets 2 10 


2 


4 35 


7 2e 


24 Wed. 


12 


rlolm Bajpt. 


12 


11 46 


3 11 


^15 


H souths 2 37 


2 


4 35 


7 2£ 


25 Thurs. 


13 


Elogius 


12 


morn. 


]) rises 


^27 


^^25. 7* ris. 1 58 


2 


4 35 


7 2^ 


26 Friday 


14 


Jeremiah 


1 


12 45 


8 36 


m 8 


^^Sirius s. 7 34^ 


3 


4 35 


7 2t 


27 Sat. 


15 


7 Sleepers 


2 


1 40 


9 12 


^20 


T? souths 8 18 


3 


4 36 


7 2^ 


26] 4th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 6. Day's length 14 hours 48 min. 


28 Sunday 


16 


Leo 


3 


2 30 


9 41 


^ 2 


Vega souths 12 5 


3 


4 36 


7 24 


29 Mond'y 


17 


Peter&Paul 


4 


3 16 


10 8 


^14 


5 Gr. Hel. Lat. S. 


3 


4 36 


7 24 


30 Tues. 


18 


Lucian 


5 


3 59 


10 33 


^26 


d^W 


3 


4 36 


7 24 


IVIOOIM'S RMASES. 


EASTERN STATES. CENTRAL STATES. WESTERN STATES. 


Last Quarter, 3d, 3 o'clock 04 min. Morn. :;i o'clock 24 min. Morn. 1 o'clock 44 min. Morn. 


New Moon, 11th, 3 " 45 " " 3 " 05 " " 2 " 25 " 


First Quarter 18th, 6 " 42 " " 6 " 02 " " 5 " 22 " 


Full Moon, 


25tl 


I, 1 " 67 


<( 


<^ 


1 


17 


« (( lO *' 


3'J 




« 



Brethreris Family Almanac. 



19 




WEATHER FORECAST. 

1st cloudy; 2d threatening; 3d cool; 4th showers; 
5th change; 6th clearing; 7th variable; 8th rain; 9th 
howery; loth thunder showers; nth sultry; 12th 
thunder; 13th rainy; 14th sultry, close; 15th heavy 
rain; i6th hail, storm, thunder; 17th change; i8th 
great heat; 19th sultry; 20th hot day; 21st intense 
heat; 22d sharp lightning; 23d cloudy, rain; 24th 
showery; 25th warm day; 26th showers; 27th cloudy; 
28th thunder; 29th thunder showers; 30th clear, 
warm. 



WHAT INDUSTRY WILL DO. '^":. '^ "° 

section or 



North Dakota which has been settled six to eight years or longer, 
where farmers cannot be found who began with little or nothing, 
and who now have from 160 to 640 acres of land, with good build- 
ings, lots of stock, necessary machinery, practically out of debt 
and who consider themselves worth from $3,000 to $25,000. (See 
page 2 for interesting facts.) 



2( 



9,! 



% 



IT WILL PAY you to consider the matter of putting up 
the IMPROVED CHAIN-STAY FENCE. It has a jointed, 
telescoping, chain-like stay, yielding to any force brought 
against it, and when this is removed, resuming its normal posi- 
tion. (See advertisement on last cover page of this Almanac.) 



covers what it is that has given such fame 
to Petra. He sees houses, temples, and a 




Tetra 



vast theatre, all hewn out of the solid rock, 
not built of stones laid one upon another, 



but cut out of the huge rocks. The theatre 
is large enough to seat thousands of people. 
Petra at one time, long before the birth of 
Christ, was the most favored city of the 
desert. Its location was about forty miles 
south of the Dead Sea. Through it passed 
the great caravans going from the Euphra- 
tes to Egypt. It grew rich and prospered. 
Its inhabitants lived in luxury. But travel 
was diverted to another route, and the 
glory of the city departed, and now it can 
be seen only in great ruins. As one views 
the monuments of its ancient grandeur, he 
is made to think that in by-gone centuries 
Moses, the great leader of the Israelites, 
may have visited the place and looked up- 
on the very objects that may now be seen 
by the traveler. He is made to think of 
Aaron, the gifted orator, who died on the 
mountain near by, and he, too, may have 
passed through the narrow defile, now for- 
saken and almost forgotten 



A CURE FOR BEE=STINQS. 



An exchange says: ''Remedies against 
bee-stings are numerous. A bee-keeper ad- 
vises always planting white poppies near the 
hives. If one is stung by one of the insects 
he takes a white poppy, cuts off its head 
and applies to the wound some drops of 
the milky juice it contains. The pain is al- 
layed at once, and no inflammation is pro- 
duced." — Translated for the Literary Digest. 



HOW TO CURE DIARRHCEA. 



Bethel, Berks Co., Pa.— Last fall I was 
taken with a kind of summer complaint ac- 
companied by a wonderful diarrhoea. Soon 
after my wife's sister, who lives with us, was 
taken in the same way. We used^ almost 
everything without benefit. Then I said, 
Let us try Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and 
Diarrhoea Remedy, which we did and that 
cured us right away. I think much of it, as 
it did for me what it was recommended to. — - 
John Hertzler, 



t 



oS-'l' 



•w'-^- 



7tli Month.] 



JULY, 



[Days 31. 



Days & Weeks 






Remarkable 
Days. 



H. 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 



H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 

S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Misceilanu. 



Son 
Slow 

M. 



sxjisr 
Rises & Sets 
H. M. I H. M. 



1 Wed. 

2 Thurs. 

3 Friday 

4 Sat. 



19 
20 
21 

22 



Theobald 
VisU V. M. 
Cornelius 
Independ. 



4 39 

5 18 

5 58 

6 39 



10 54 

11 18 
11 40 
morn. 



^ 9 
*21 



Spicaso. 8 50 ^S 
2. 3) in Apogee 
in Aphelion 

6 $1) 



4 37 
4 37 
4 37 

4 38 



7 23 
7 23 
7 23 
7 22 



27] 5th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 5. 



Day^s length 14 hours 44 min. 



5 Sunday 

6 Mond'y 


23 
24 


7 Tues. 


25 


8 Wed. 


26 


9 Thurs. 


27 


10 Friday 

11 Sat. 


28 
29 



Demetrius 

John Huss 

Edulburga 

Aquilla 

Zeno 

J. Calvin^ h. 

Pius 



9 


7 22 


12 5 


^ 1 


10 


8 9 


12 45 


^15 


10 


9 10 


1 28 


^30 


11 


10 54 


2 5 


^^^ 


12 


11 52 


3 


^30 


1 


12 46 


2) sets 


«15 


2 


1 14 


8 16 


«30 



S rises 1 38 
T? souths 7 42 
Orion rises 4 26 

d 2 O Superior 

^ 10. d ? 3) 

If Ij: souths 1 





4 


4 38 




4 


4 38 




5 


4 39 




5 


4 39 


• 


5 


4 39 


n 


5 


4 40 


44 


5 


4 40 



22 
22 
21 
21 
21 
20 
20 



28] 6th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 5. 



Day's length 14 hours 40 min. 



12 Sunday 

13 Mond'y 


30 
J. 


14 Tues. 


2 


15 Wed. 


3 


16 Thurs. 


4 


17 Friday 

18 Sat. 


5 
6 



Henry 

Margaret 

Bona vent 

Apostles' da, 

Hilary 

Alexius 

Maternus 



3 


1 49 


8 58 


*tl^ 


4 


2 31 


9 22 


^29 


4 


3 21 


9 44 


^13 


5 


4 9 


10 5 


^27 


6 


4 57 


10 28 


^10 


7 


5 47 


10 58 


^^8^ JjO 


7 


6 40 


11 30 


m 5 



6 1-11)' ^^g ^^y^ begin. 

11 sets 11 4 

Altair so. 12 10 S 

2) in Perigee 

Tp stationary 

17. Tp sets 1 40 
? in ffi. d T? 2) 



5 


4 41 


6 


4 41 


6 


4 42 


6 


4 43 


6 


4 43 


6 


4 44 


6 


4 45 



19 
19 
18 
17 
17 
16 
15 



29] 7th Sunday after Trinity. 



Mark 8. 



Day's length 14 hours 30 min. 



19 Sunday 

20 Mond'y 


7 
8 


21 Tues. 


9 


22 Wed. 


10 


23 Thurs. 


11 


24 Friday 

25 Sat. 


12 
13 



Puffina 

Elias 

Praxedes 

Mary Mag. 

Apollinar. 

Christiana 

St. James 



8 


7 36 


morn. 


«18 


9 


8 35 


12 23 


«30 


10 


9 35 


1 5 


S^12 


11 


10 34 


2 4 


^24 


12 


11 30 


3 2 


m 6 


12 


morn. 


]) rises 


^1^ 


1 


12 22 


8 11 


^29 



d Itt 3) 

Markab souths 3 5 

Orion rises 4 10 

5 in Per. ©ent.cgf ^' 

$ in Perihelion 

^rj|24. Alg. so. 3 57 

W^Pollux sets 8 19 



6 


4 46 


6 


4 47 


6 


4 48 


6 


4 48 


6 


4 49 


6 


4 50 


6 


4 51 



14 
13 
12 
12 
11 
10 
9 



30] 8th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 7. 



Day's length 14 hours 18 min. 



26 Sunday 

27 Mond'y 

28 Tues. 

29 Wed. 

30 Thurs. 

31 Friday 



St. Anna 

Martha 

Pantaleon 

Beatrix 

Upton 

Germanus 



2 


1 9 


8 35 


^11 


3 


1 53 


8 58 


^23 


3 


2 34 


9 22 


S? 6 


4 


3 14 


9 44 


a^i8 


5 


3 54 


10 8 


^ 1 


5 


4 34 


10 31 


f?«14 



Antares souths 7 
T? souths 6 20 
l^C stationary 
Spica sets 10 10 
]) in Apogee 
d ? Superior 



58 



6 


4 52 


6 


4 53 


6 


4 53 


6 


4 54 


6 


4 55 


6 


4 56 



IVIOOIM'S RMASEIS 

EASTERN STATES. 
Last Quarter, 2d, 8 o'clock 25 min. Even. 
New Moon, 10th, 2 " 37 " 
First Quarter 17th, 11 " 06 " Mom. 
Full Moon, 24th, 12 " 47 " Even. 



CENTRAL STATES. 

7 o'clock 45 min. Even. 

1 " 57 " 
10 " 26 " Morn. 
12 " 07 " Even. 



WESTERN STATES. 
7 o'clock 05 min. Even. 
1 " 17 " 
9 " 46 " Morn. 
11 " 27 " 



Venus is in superior conjunction with the Sun on the 9th and changes from morning to evening star. 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



21 




WFATHER FORECAST, 

1st fair; 2d cloudy; 3d windy; 4th thunder; 5th 
:louds; 6th sultry; 7th warm day; 8th showers; gth 
•ain; loth thunder shower; nth damp, foggy; 12th 
ihowery; 13th wet day; 14th thunder; 15th thunder 
;torm; i6th fair; 17th windy; i8th cloudy; i gth dark 
lay; 20th thunder shower; 21st fine day; 22d cool; 
53d -Ogs,' ; 24th rain;' 25th showers; 26th thunder; 
7th showery; 28th unsettled; 29th variable; 30th 
varmer; 31st sultry, close. 



-¥p? CAN The new settler can yet find Homestead land 
! in North Dakota within sight of the telegraph 



ires. In the Turtle Mountain country and Mouse River Valley 
e can get off the Great Northern train and within an hour, be on 
and he can call his own. (See page 2 for further information.) 



EVEN ON THE FOURTH OF JULY don't for- 
get that the new IMPROVED CHAIN-STAY FENCE is 
an improvement on anything you have seen. Quite a 
hange from our last year's pattern. (See advertisement on last 
:over page of this Almanac.) 



TALK FROM A HORSE, 



Don't ask me to "back" with blinds on. 
[ am afraid to. 

Don't lend me to some blockhead that has 
Less sense than I have. 

Don't be so careless of my harness as to 
ind a great sore on me before you attend 
o it. 

Don't run me down a steep hill, for if any- 
:hing should give way I might break your 
leck. 

Don't whip me when I get frightened 
ilong the road, or I'll expect it next time and 
nay be make trouble. 

Don't think because I go free under the 
A^hip I don't get tired. You would move up 
f under the whip. 

Don't put on my blind bridle so that it 
rritates my eyes, or so leave my forelock 
;hat it will be in my eyes. 

Don't hitch me to an iron post or railing 
vhen the mercury is below freezing. I need 
he skin on my tongue. 



Don't keep my stable very dark, for when 
I go out into the light my eyes are injured, 
especially if snow be on the ground. 

Don't leave me hitched in my stall at 

night with a big cob right where I must lie 

down. I am tied and can't select a smooth 

place. 

. » . 

BORAX AS A FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 



Frank M. Smith, of California (known as 
the *' Borax King " ), has made an import- 
ant extension of the use of borax. The 
utility of this substance in preserving fresh 
meat has been demonstrated. He has now 
tried it on fruit, with similar good results. 
His experiment was made with cherries, 
which were packed in powdered borax and 
kept for three weeks, 'when they proved to 
be as fresh and good as at first. Other cher- 
ries, exposed at the same time, were com- 
pletely spoiled in three days. He then 
packed a quantity of cherries in a barrel 
of borax and sent them by slow freight to 
Chicago, where they arrived in perfect con- 
dition. This discovery may prove of much 
importance. Borax is cheap and abundant, 
and the same material can be used again 
and again. Private families and hotels, says 
Mr. Smith, could have borax bins, in which 
fresh fruit could be kept long after the sea- 
son, and they could enjoy *' cherries in the 
autumn and figs at Christmas." — The In- 

form,er. 

— — ■ ^ ■ 

IT NEVER FAILS. 



My wife is subject to cramp in the stomach. She 
has tried Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and Diarrhoea 
Remedy, and that is her medicine now for a speedy 
relief. It never fails. — S. S. Beaver, McAHsterville, 
Juniata Co., Pa. 

Every family should keep this remedy at 
hand. No one can tell how soon it may be 
needed. It costs but 25 cents per bottle, 
and when needed is worth a hundred times 
its cost. Nearly all druggists and many 
merchants sell it. 



8tli Month.] 



f\UGUST. 



[Days 31, 



Daus & Weeks 


CO 


Remarkable 
Daus. 


H. 


MOON 
Souths. 
H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 

S. D. 


ftspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 


Sun 
Slow 

M. 


sxjisr 

Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Sat. 


20 


Larmnas cfy 


6 


5 16 


11 14 


jp^27®l. Alt. so. 10 58^ 


6 4 57 7 3 



31] 9th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 16. 



Day's length 14 hours 06 min. 



2 Sunday 

3 Mond'y 

4 Tues. 

5 Wed. 

6 Thurs. 

7 Friday 

8 Sat. 



21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 



Augustus 

Dominick 

Stephen 

Oswald 

Tr. of Christ 

Godfrey 

Emilius 



9 
10 
11 
12 

1 



6 11 

7 49 

8 42 

9 37 

10 37 

11 32 

12 7 



11 42 
morn. 

12 40 



31 
25 
19 



2) sets 



« 9 

>«24 

<et 9 



S rises 12 40 
□ T? 0- ct W 3) 

S souths 6 27 ^ 
% souths 7 20 
8. d ^ 2. QfS^. 




6 


4 58 


6 


4 59 


6 


5 


6 


5 1 


6 


5 2 


5 


5 3 


5 


5 4 



7 2 
7 1 
7 
6 59 



58 
57 
56 



32] 10th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 19. 



Day's length 13 hours 52 min. 



9 Sunday 

10 Mond'y 

11 Tues. 

12 Wed. 

13 Thurs. 

14 Friday 

15 Sat. 



28 
29 
30 
31 
A 
2 
3 



Ericus 

St. Lawren. 

Titus 

Clara 

Hildebert 

Eusebius 

Assn. V. M. 



2 


12 49 


7 38 


*f23 


2 


1 13 


8 4 


^ 7 


3 


2 3 


8 28 


^22 


4 


2 53 


8 54 


^ -5 


5 


3 43 


9 24 


J3^ 18 


5 


4 36 


9 50 


« 1 


6 


5 31 


10 24 


«14 



dlf]). d?]). d^2) 
? sets 4 54 
2) in Perigee 

dlfO.^DiitO s 

Orion rises 1 50 

||?Gr.Hel.Lat.N. 
f 15. dl?]). 6V^1) 



5 


5 6 


5 


5 7 


5 


5 8 


5 


5 9 


5 


5 10 


4 


5 11 


4 


5 12 



54 
53 

52 
6 51 
6 50 
6 49 
6 48 



33] 11th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 18. 



Day's length 13 hours 36 min. 



16 Sunday 


4 


Rochus 


7 


6 29 


11 21 


«26 


T? sets 12 4 


4 


5 14 


6 46 


17 Mond'y 


5 


Bertram 


8 


7 29 


11 49 


m 8 


Polaris souths 3 32 


4 


5 15 


6 45 


18 Tues. 


6 


Agapetus 


9 


8 27 


morn. 


ij^20 


Procyon sets 3 22 


4 


5 16 


6 44 


19 Wed. 


7 


Sebaldus 


10 


9 24 


12 23 


m 2 


Arcturus s. 11 27 ^ 


3 


5 17 


6 43 


20 Thurs. 


8 


Bernard 


11 


10 16 


1 31 


^14 


Orion rises 1 23 


3 


5 18 


6 42 


21 Friday 


9 


Rebecca 


12 


11 4 


2 41 


^26 


l^ souths 4 45 


3 


5 19 


6 41 


22 Sat. 


10 


Philibert 


12 


11 49 


3 57 


^ 8 


]) eclipsed, visible 


3 


5 21 


6 39 



34] 12th Sunday after Trinity. Mark 17. 



Day's length 13 hours 28 min. 



23 Sunday 


11 


24 Mond'y 


12 


25 Tues. 


13 


26 Wed. 


14 


27 Thurs. 


15 


28 Friday 


16 


29 Sat. 


17 



Zaccheus 

St. Barthol. 

Ludovicus 

Samuel 

Gebhard 

St.Augustin 

St. John heh. 



1 


morn. 


2) ris. 


^20 


1 


12 31 


7 1 


S5 2 


2 


1 11 


7 24 


S^l^ 


3 


1 51 


7 56 


2^28 


4 


2 31 


8 24 


ff«ll 


5 


3 12 


8 46 


^24 


5 


3 55 


9 20 


^ 8 



23. ©enters^ 
Ach. S0.3 22 S 
^ingj. Dog days end 
Rigel rises 12 20 
]) in Apogee 
% souths 11 16 
Capella rises 12 43 



2 


5 22 


2 


5 23 


2 


5 24 


2 


5 25 


1 


5 27 


1 


5 28 


1 


5 29 



38' 
37 
36 



6 35 
6 33 



32 
31 



35] 13th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 10. 



Day's length 13 hours 02 min. 



30 Sunday 

31 Mond'y 



Benjamin 
Paulinus 



4 42 

5 32 



9 58 
10 36 



^22 



^S rises 12 10 
3L dc^D-Dc^O 



5 30 
5 31 



6 30 
6 29 



EASTERN STATES. 
Last Quarter, 1st, 1 o'clock 36 min 
New Moon, 9th, 12 " 04 " 
First Quarter, 15th, 4 ' 04 '' 
Full Moon, 23d, 1 " 46 " 
Last Quarter, Slst, 5 " 57 " 



IVIOOIM'S F^MASES. 

CENTRAL STATES. 
Even. 12 o'clock 66 min. Even. 

Morn. 8th, 11 " 24 " 
Even. 3 " 24 " " 

Morn. 1 " 06 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 


12 o 


'clock 16 


mm. 


Even 


10 


" 44 


« 


« 


2 


" 44 


ti 


tt 


12 


26 


t( 


Morn 


4 


37 


i( 


<( 



Jupiter is in conjanction with the Sun on the 12th and cannot be seen. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



23 




WEATHER FORECAST. 

ist sultry; 2d thunder; 3d change; 4th thunder show- 
; 5th showery; 6th thunder; 7th foggy; 8th warm day; 

cloudy; loth warm day; nth thunder storm; 12th 
under; 13th showery; 14th change; 15th cloudy; 
th damp day; 17th clearing; i8th clouds; 19th 

eatening; 20th rainy day; 21st sultry; 22d clouds; 
d change; 24th clear; 25th fine; 26th unsettled; 
th damp, misty; 28th warmer; 29th windy; 30th 
3udy; 31st rainy. 



ROP PAYMENTS. 



Land can be bought in 

North Dakota on the 

op Payment Plan. It is not uncommon for crops of a single 
ar to pay for the farm. (See page 2 for information of impor- 
ice to home-seekers.) 



N THE HEAT OF AUGUST everything expands, 
but the IMPROVED CHAIN-STAY SMOOTH-WIRE 
FENCE is kept tight by the famous Eureka Ratchet, the 

st made. (See advertisement on last cover page of this 

manac.) 




[om 



WORSHIPING THE WHITE ELEPHANT. 



We worship the living God, who made 

11 le heavens and the earth; but the people 

1 the kingdom of Siam, in the southern 

art of Asia worship the white elephant. 

'hat is their god. It is sometimes called 



the land of the white elephant, but by the 
Siamese themselves, the kingdom of the fire; 
that is those who are free from the super- 
stitions of the Hindoo Brahmins. " But," 
says H. L. Hastings, '* if they are free from 
these superstitions, they have many others, 
for they are Buddhists, and believe that 
each successive Buddha has long series of 
transformations, occupying the forms of 
various white animals, — such as swans, 
storks, crows, sparrows, dogs, monkeys and 
elephants, all of which are found white in 
Siam. 

The Siamese greatly reverence white ani- 
mals; and the white elephant especially, is 
supposed to be animated by the spirit of 
some great king or hero. Hence it is sup- 
posed that having been a great man, and 
familiar with the dangers of high position, 
he will know what is best and safest for 
other rulers, and will protect them from ca- 
lamity, and bring prosperity and peace to 
the people. So from earliest days the kings 
of Siam and Burmah 
have diligently sought 
for white elephants. 

The white elephants 
are really of a sort of 
salmon or flesh color, 
but they are objects of 
constant care and ador- 
ation. The national 
standard is a white ele- 
phant on a crimson 
ground. A white mon- 
key is kept in the 
stable-palace of the 
white elephant, to ward 
off evil spirits. 

In 1862 a magnificent 
white elephant was cap- 
tured; grand preparations were made to 
receive him; a splendid pavilion sprung i!p 
as if by magic before the eastern gate of 
the palace; the whole nation was wild with 
joy over their new god; but presently came 
the appalling news, the white elephant was 
dead! King and people were both plunged 



9tli M(3nth.] 



September: 



[Days 30. 



Days & Weeks 




1 Tue8. 


20 


2 Wed. 


21 


3 Thurs. 


22 


4 Frid 


23 


5 Sat. 


24 



Remarkable 
Days. 





MOON 
Souths. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets. 


Moon's 
Signs. 


H. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


S. D. 


-7 


6 25 


11 21 


^20 


8 


7 20 


morn. 


m 4 


9 


8 17 


12 20 


«19 


10 


9 13 


1 36 


■i* 4 


11 


10 37 


2 54 


^18 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



STunsr 
Rises & Sets. 
H. M. I H. M. 



Egidius 

Eliza 

Mansuetus 

Moses 
Nathaniel 



d tJJJ 

Vega souths 7 

T? souths 3 57 

^ in Aphelion 

If rises 5 20 



44 



n 



5 33 
5 34 
5 35 
5 36 

5 38 



6 27 
6 26 
6 25 
6 24 

6 22 



371 14th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 7. 



Day's length 12 hours 44 min. 



6 Sunday 


25 


Magnus 


12 


11 43 


4 6 


^ 2 


6%1) 


2 


5 39 


6 21 


7 Mond'y 


26 


Regina 


1 


12 42 


]) sets 


^16 


/0[[||7. $ sets 4 52 S 


2 


5 40 


6 20 


8 Tues. 


27 


mt. V. M. 


2 


1 34 


6 49 


^30 


W'c5?3).])i. Perigee 


3 


5 41 


6 19 


9 Wed. 


28 


Bruno 


3 


2 27 


7 14 


^5% 13 


d ?]) 


3 


5 43 


6 17 


10 Thurs. 


29 


Pulcheria 


4 


3 14 


7 40 


^26 


T^ sets 11 14 


3 


5 44 


6 16 


11 Friday 


30 


Protus 


5 


3 52 


8 2 


« 9 


d Tp 3). d 1^1 2) 


4 


5 45 


6 15 


12 Sat. 


31 


J, WicUiffe 


5 


4 23 


8 32 


«22 


a tjj'o 


4 


5 47 


6 13 



38] 15th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 6. 



Day's length 12 hours 26 min. 



13 Sunday 

14 Mond'y 


S. 

2 


15 Tues. 


3 


16 Wed. 


4 


17 Thurs. 


5 


18 Friday 

19 Sat. 


6 

7 



Amatus 

Elev.Holy^ 

Nicetus 

Emberday 

Lambertus 

Siegfried 

Micleta 



6 


5 22 


9 7 


m 4 


7 


6 22 


9 49 


m^^ 


8 


7 19 


11 1 


#^28 


9 


8 13 


morn. 


^10 


10 


9 2 


12 14 


^22 


10 


9 47 


1 32 


f% 4 


11 


10 30 


2 59 


^^16 



l|13.$G.Elong.E. 
iflir souths 10 23 



Fomalh 



3 
so. 11 16 ^ 

Vega sets 7 1 
7- rises 8 36 
Orion rises 11 37 
$ souths 5 15 



4 


5 48 


5 


5 49 


5 


5 50 


5 


5 52 


6 


5 53 


6 


5 54 


6 


5 56 



12 
11 
10 
8 
7 
6 
4 



39] 16th Sunday after Trinity. Lake 



Day's length 12 hours 08 min. 



20 Sunday 


8 


21 Mond'y 


9 


22 Tues. 


10 


23 Wed. 


11 


24 Thurs. 


12 


25 Friday 


13 


26 Sat. 


14 



Fausta 

St. Matthew 

Maurice 

Hosea 

St. John con. 

Cleophas 

Justina 



12 


11 10 


4 10 


^28 


12 


morn. 


J) rises 


:Sii 


1 


12 9 


6 16 


S^24 


2 


12 49 


6 40 


^. ^ 


3 


1 10 


7 7 


f?*21 


3 


1 52 


7 37 


^ 5 


4 


2 38 


8 24 


^19 



Capella souths 5 48 
C^Sl.Polar. s. 114 

i?^~ J /--> ent-_fv^D.<fcN .eql. n 
%^ k!^ers W^ Aut. beg. 66 

]) in Apogee 

d cT W- d ? ? 

5 Gr. Hel. Lat. S. 

5 stationary 



7 


5 57 


7 


5 58 


7 


6 


8 


6 1 


8 


6 2 


8 


6 4 


9 


6 5 



3 

2 

59 
58 
56 
55 



40] 17th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 14. Day's length 11 hours 50 min. 


27 Sunday 


15 


Cosmus 


4 


3 26 


9 20 


^ 3 


Antares sets 8 30 


9 


6 6 


5 54 


28 Mond'y 


16 


Wenceslaus 


5 


4 17 


10 26 


^^^ 


d $ 3). d c? ]) 


9 


6 8 


5 52 


29 Tues. 


17 


St. Michael 


6 


5 10 


10 57 


m 1 


/^29.<^ris.lll4n 


10 


6 9 


5 51 


30 Wed. 


18 


Jerome 


7 


6 -5 


11 31 


^€15 


\j£^ T? souths 2 20 


10 


6 10 


5 50 



IVIOOIM'S rmase:3. 



EASTERN STATES. 
New Moon, 7th, 8 o'clock 45 min Morn. 
P'irst Quarter, 13th, 11 " 11 " Even. 
Full Moon, -21 st, 5 ' 51 " 
Last Quarter, 29th, 9 " 00 " *' 



CENTRAL STATES. 
8 o'clock 05 min. Morn. 
10 " 31 " Even. 
5 " 11 ** 
8 " 20 " *• 



WESTERN STATES. 
7 o'clock 25 min. Morn. 
9 " 51 " Even. 
4 " 31 " " 

7 " 40 " *• 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



25 




WEATHER FORECAST. 

1st damp; 2d variable; 3d clouds; 4th unsettled; 
5th drizzly; 6th change; 7th cloudy; 8th thunder; gth 
warm day; loth rainy; nth clouds; 12th cooler; 13th 
variable; 14th clearing; 15th clear day; i6th windy; 
17th change; i8th clear, brilliant; 19th cool; 20th 
clouds; 2ist rain; 22d variable; 23d clearing; 24th 
warmer; 25th thunder showers; 26th fog; 27th cooler; 
28th rainy day; 2Qth stormy; 30th frost. 



GOOD WAGON ROADS. * ^""^ ^'' 

_: the-year round 

dirt road is one of the boasts of North Dakota. After the 
heaviest rains the roads dry off quickly and one can speed a horse 
on an average road almost any day in the year. The advantages 
of good wagon roads are understood by those who have struggled 
and toiled over the bad spring, fall and winter roads of the East 
and South. In North Dakota, large loads can be hauled and 
horses spared the worry and strain caused by muddy and uneven 
roads. Wagons and buggies last longer, because they are not 
subject to so much mud and wear and tear. (See page 2 for 
more particulars.) 



PEOPLE ARE NOW WANTING to buy their 
winter's wood. So pull down your old, dilapidated rail 
fences, sell the rails and invest the proceeds in the IM- 
PROVED CHAIN-STAY FENCE. Your rails will pay for 
the wire. (See advertisement on last cover page of this Almanac.) 



into the deepest grief. The brains and 
heart of the white elephant were burned, and 
the carcass was shrouded in linen and car- 
ried down to the river with wailings and 
dirges, to be thrown into the gulf of Siam. 

The discoverer of a white elephant is re- 
warded by having his mouth, ears and, nose 
stuffed with gold. The most distinguished 
men are sent to capture the elephant. He is 
brought with great pomp and ceremony to 
the king's palace, where the highest lords 
are sent to feed him with the choicest food 
out of a golden dish. His harness glitters 
with jewels, his feet are cleansed in a silver 
basin, and the white elephant bears the title 
of lord, and is ranked next to the king, and 
before the queen in dignity. " King of the 
white elephants " is the proud title of the 
rulers of Burmah and Siam. 

In November, 1877, there died at Bang- 
kok, at the age of ninety-seven, the oldest 



white elephant in Siam. The whole of the 
people put on mourning. One hundred 
Buddhist priests ofificiated at the funeral. 
The other three white elephants walked 
with the funeral crowd, preceded by an 
immense company of people, to the banks 
of the river Menam, where his body was 
received by the king and his nobles, and 
carried over to the opposite side, to be 
buried with royal honors. 

These be thy gods, O heathenism and 
Buddhism, and after all the fairy tales 
which heathen orators tell about the excel- 
lences of their religions, when we come to 
see them at home we come down to degrada- 
tion, darkness and idolatry, where men wor- 
ship the creature more than the Creator, 
who is God over all, blessed forevermore." 



TO CURE A FELON. 



Those who have been afflicted with a 
felon, should note this: Take sassafras bark 
and grind it, — in the coffee-mill or other- 
wise; stir into a poultice with cold water, 
and apply to the felon. Keep wet by put- 
ting in cold water; that is, do not let it dry 
out. In a short time the felon will be 
killed. The writer says that a woman who 
had been suffering extreme pain night and 
day, and could get no sleep, was told of 
this remedy. She immediately tried it, and 
in fifteen minutes after the application she 
was asleep. When she awoke, the felon was 
\i\W.^di.^Lutheran Observer. 



ELDER BERKEY'S WIFE SAVES THE LIFE 
OF A NEIGHBOR. 



A NEIGHBOR woman was afflicted with cramp 
colic. My wife thought it would cost her life. She 
gave the woman Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and 
Diarrhoea Remedy according to directions and it 
gave perfect satisfaction. I do heartily recommend 
it to do all it is recommended to do, and feel thank- 
ful for the good it has done. — Joseph Berkey, Hills- 
boro, Somerset Co., Pa. 

For sale at 25 cents per bottle, by drug- 
gists and merchants. 



lOth Month.] 






OGTOBE>R. 




Days 31. 


Days & Weeks 




Remarkable 
Days. 


H. 


MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets. 

H. M. 


Moon's 
5igns. 

S. D. 


Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 


Sun 
Fast 

M. 


Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Thurs. 

2 Frid. 

3 Sat. 


19 
20 
21 


Remigius 
G. Columbus 
Jairus 


7 
8 
9 


6 59 

7 53 

8 45 


morn. 
12 47 

2 2 


«29 
<et27 


% souths 9 29 ^ 
Sirius rises 1 6 

6%1) 


10 

11 
11 


6 12 

6 13 
6 14 


5 48 
5 47 
5 46 



40] 18th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 22. 



Day's length 11 hours 32 min. 



4 Sunday 


22 


5 Mond'y 


23 


6 Tues. 


24 


7 Wed. 


25 


8 Thurs. 


26 


9 Friday 


27 


Sat. 


28 



Franciscus 

Placidus 

Fides 

Amelia 

Pelagius 

Dionysius 

Gereon 



10 


9 36 


3 21 


^11 


11 


10 57 


4 34 


^25 


12 


12 


]) sets 


^5% o 


1 


12 48 


6 3 


^5% ^1 


2 


1 9 


6 30 


<« 4 


3 


2 9 


7 4 


«17 


4 


3 11 


7 35 


«30 



% rises 4 10 
c^ souths 4 38 

^0|||6. Arc. s. 
'^Pd^S). JinPerigee 
d ? ]). d ? Inferior 
d T7 ]) d lit D. ^ 
T2 sets 10 30 





11 


6 16 


8 


12 


6 17 


6 


12 


6 18 


ee 


12 


6 19 


or 


13 


6 21 


8 


13 


6 22 




13 


6 23 



44 
43 
42 
41 

39 
38 
37 



41] 19th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 9. 



Day's length 11 hours 14 min. 



11 Sunday 


29 


Burkhard 


5 


4 13 


8 8 


^12 


T? souths 1 42 


13 


6 24 


5 36 


12 Mond'y 


30 


Veritas 


6 


5 13 


9 19 


jg024 


Regulusris. 10 27^ 


14 


6 25 


5 35 


13 Tues. 





Coloman 


7 


6 8 


10 30 


m 6 


^^13. c?in S 


14 


6 27 


5 33 


14 Wed. 


2 


Fortunata 


8 


6 59 


11 41 


^18 


sP?inS 


14 


6 28 


5 32 


15 Thurs. 


3 


Hedwick 


9 


7 46 


morn. 


^30 


d ? T? 


14 


6 29 


5 31 


16 Friday 


4 


Gallus 


9 


8 29 


12 53 


^.12 


Fomalhaut so. 9 26 


14 


6 31 


5 29 


17 Sat. 


5 


Florentina 


10 


9 20 


2 1 


^24 


5 stationary 


15 


6 32 


5 28 



42] 20th Sunday after Trinity. 


Matt. 


22. 


Day's length 10 hours 56 min. 


18 Sunday 


6 


St. Luhe^ ev. 


11 


10 28 


3 23 


S^ 6 


5 in Perihelion Q, 


15 


6 33 


5 27 


19 Mond'y 


7 


Ptolemy 


12 


11 8 


4 19 


S^19 


d $3i{ 


15 


6 35 


5 25 


20 Tues. 


8 


Felicianus 


1 


11 51 


5 16 


^ 2 


Algenib souths 10 8 


15 


6 36 


5 24 


21 Wed. 


9 


Ursula 


1 


morn. 


prises 


^1^ 


£%^'^' DinApog. 


15 


6 37 


5 23 


22 Thurs. 


10 


Cordula 


2 


12 35 


6 1 


f?*30 


^/Markabso.9 16 


15 


6 39 


5 21 


23 Friday 


11 


Severinus 


2 


1 23 


6 37 


^14 


11 so. 8 18. ©entcjlg 


16 


6 40 


5 20 


24 Sat. 


12 


Salome 


3 


2 13 


7 20 


^28 


^ Gr. Elong. W. 


16 


6 41 


5 19 



43] 21sT Sunday after Trinity. 


John 4. 


Day's length 10 hours 38 min. 


25 Sunday 

26 Mond'y 


13 
14 


Crispin 
Amandus 


4 

5 


3 5 
3 59 


8 32 

9 46 


,)g^l3 

^28 


6^D 
6 Si) 


16 
16 


6 42 
6 43 


5 18 
5 17 


27 Tues. 


15 


Sabina 


6 


4 52 


10 50 


«12 


$ rises 10 28 r^ 


16 


6 45 


5 15 


28 Wed. 


16 


Simon Jude 


7 


5 44 


11 22 


«26 


Sirius rises 11 26 


16 


6 46 


5 14 


29 Thurs. 

30 Friday 

31 Sat. 


17 

18 
19 


Zwinglius 
Serapion 
Hallow Eve 


7 
8 
9 


6 35 

7 24 

8 13 


morn. 

12 7 

1 8 


^10 
«^24 

^ 8 


/fN29. ?G. H.L.N. 
\||^ 11 rises 3 20 
6111) 


16 
16 
16 


6 47 
6 48 
6 50 


5 13 
5 12 
5 10 



EASTERN STATES. 

New Moon, 6th, 5 o'clock 20 min. 
First Quarter, 13th, 9 " 49 " 
Full Moon, 21st, 11 " 19 " 
Last Quarter, 29th. 10 " 22 " 



IVIOON'S RMASEIS. 

CENTRAL STATES. 

Even. 4 o'clock 40 min. Even. 

Morn. 9 '* 09 " Morn. 

10 " 39 " 
« 9 " 42 " " 



WESTERN STATES. 

4 o'clock 00 min. Even. 

8 " 29 " Morn. 

9 " 59 " 

9 " 02 " " 



Brethreris Family Almanac, 



2; 




WEATHER FORECAST. 

1st windy; 2d change; 3d cloudy; 4th rain; 5th 
Dudy, rain; 6th threatening; 7th thunder shower; 
ti cooler, frost; 9th frosty; loth clouds; nth rain; 
th unsettled; 13th blustery, colder; 14th cold; 15th 
ear; i6th variable; 17th wind; i8th warmer; 19th 
oudy; 20th frosty, fair; 21st frost; 22d clouds; 23d 
iny day; 24th change; 25th dull day; 26th clouds; 
th rain; 28th showery; 29th clearing; 30th fine day; 
St change. 



HURCH-GOING PEOPLE ^^X^ 



fiuence and facilities by settling in North Dakota. Nearly all 
e leading denominations are represented. Sunday schools are 
und in every community. The Union Sunday School has a 
ace in nearly every country public school house. The people 
North Dakota are moral and law-abiding. The State also pro- 
bits the sale of intoxicating liquors. (See page 2 for more 
formation.) 



klOW THAT SEEDING IS DONE, you can in- 

U vestigate the claims of the new IMPROVED CHAIN- 
^ STAY FENCE. A failure to do so may be the occasion 
r regrets. (See advertisement on last cover page of this Al- 
anac.) 



THE CHURCH IN NORTH DAKOTA. 



Prior to 1894 there was no settlement of 
brethren in North Dakota, nor indeed to my 
nowledge a single person of our church and 
elief in the whole State. It should not be 
nderstood by this that this State was non- 
eligious; on the contrary, all the leading 
eligious organizations are well represented, 
nd the Union Sunday School is a feature in 
learly every community. Not only is there 

high moral and religious feeling among the 
)eople of Dakota, but they are temperate as 
veil, the law of the State prohibiting the 
ale of intoxicating liquors, and the saloon 
iocs not curse the cities and towns. 

The first step, looking to a movement of 
Brethren to North Dakota, was taken in the 
;ummer of 1893, when, in company with 
Brethren Samuel Burkhart, of Nappanee, 
[nd., and Judson Beckwith, of Teegarden, 
[nd., both deacons, I left my home at 



Walkerton, Ind., July 31, for a tour of the 
Red River Valley and Turtle Mountain 
region. We were induced to take the trip 
by Mr. Max Bass, of the Great Northern 
Railway, who spared no efforts to have us 
see all the advantages and disadvantages of 
the country. The result was that we three 
made locations at Cando, and then returned 
home to Indiana and reported our action, 
which caused others to go the same fall, most 
of whom either bought land or filed on 
Government homesteads. 

During the winter of 1893-4 the interest 
in this country spread among the Brethren 
throughout Indiana, which resulted in a 
special train, containing about 300 persons, 
leaving Walkerton on March 27, destined for 
Cando, where all arrived without delay or 
mishap. While busy with the duties of 
home-making we did not neglect our meet- 
ings, which gradually led up to the organi- 
zation of a church, Elders W. R. Deeter and 
Daniel Whitmer officiating, which formally 
took place on August 4, 1894, with a mem- 
bership of 86 souls, including four ministers 
and four deacons. 

In April, 1895, another special train of 
Brethren and others, numbering over 400, 
left Indiana for this State, and made new 
settlements at various points along the Great 
Northern Railway, principally at Mayville, 
Rutten, Church's Ferry, York and Island 
Lake. ^ A church was soon organized at 
Rutten, known as Sweet Water, so called 
from the name of a neighboring lake, and at 
Mayville, the former with a membership of 
38 and the latter with 46 members. The 
question of organizing churches at other 
points is being discussed, and we hope before 
another year passes there will be no less 
than six or eight churches of our people in 
this State. The Cando church was favored 
this year by a visit from the General Mis- 
sionary Committee, and our people were 
edified by several excellent addresses. 

I shall not attempt to discuss the reasons 
why we located in what is thought to be a 



nth Month.] 



NOVEMBER. 



[Days 30. 



Days & Weeks 






Remarkable 
Days. 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 

S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



SXJ3SI- 

Rises & Sets. 
H. M. I H. M. 



44] 22d Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 18. 



Day's length 10 hours 20 min. 



1 Sunday 


20 


2 Mond'y 


21 


3 Tues. 


22 


4 Wed. 


23 


5 Thurs. 


24 


6 Friday 


25 


7 Sat. 


26 



All Saints 

All Souls 

Theophilus 

Charlotte 

Malachi 

Leonard 

Engelbert 



10 


9 3 


2 13 


^21 


11 


9 54 


3 19 


m 4 


11 


10 49 


4 30 


tfil7 


12 


11 48 


5 38 


^30 


1 


12 50 


J) sets 


«13 


2 


1 55 


5 30 


cf^25 


3 


2 58 


6 25 


m 8 



Vega sets 12 28 S'^ 
$ stationary 
H souths 7 41 
2) in Perigee, d ? 3) 

5. d T? ]). 6V^1) 
gp? sets 5 10 
d $ 



16 


6 51 


16 


6 52 


16 


6 53 


16 


6 54 


16 


6 55 


16 


6 56 


16 


6 58 



45] 23d Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 22. 



Day's length 10 hours 04 min. 



8 Sunday 


27 


9 Mond'y 


28 


Tues. 


29 


1 Wed. 


30 


2 Thurs. 


31 


3 Friday 


N. 


4 Sat. 


2 



Cecilia 

Theodore 

Mar. Luther 

Melanchton 

Jonas 

Winebert 

Levin 



4 


3 49 


7 23 


#^20 


5 


4 36 


8 32 


(^^ - 


6 


5 10 


9 53 


^u 


7 


5 31 


10 36 


^26 


7 


6 26 


11 38 


ih 7 


8 


7 8 


morn. 


^19 


9 


7 48 


12 34 


^ 1 



Aldebaran rises 6 36 
Orion rises 8 19 ^ 
$ souths 2 32 
Andromeda so. 8 52 

1x12. ? in Aphel. 

Id b 

Akol so. 11 23 a 



16 


6 59 


16 


7 


16 


7 1 


16 


7 2 


15 


7 3 


15 


7 4 


15 


7 5 



46] 24th Sunday after Trinity. Matt 21. 



Day's length 9 hours 50 min. 



15 Sunday 


3 


16 Mond'y 


4 


17 Tues. 


5 


18 Wed. 


6 


19 Thurs. 


7 


20 Friday 


8 


21 Sat. 


9 



Leopold 

Ottomar 

Alpheus 

Gelasius 

Elizaheth 

Amos 

Off.V.Mahf 



10 


8 26 


1 41 


.S^14 


10 


9 8 


2 38 


^27 


11 


9 49 


3 39 


^10 


11 


10 33 


4 42 


^^24 


12 


11 19 


5 41 


^ 8 


12 


morn. 


3) rises 


^-^2 


1 


12 9 


5 59 


m "^ 



5 souths 2 13 

6 lit 

]) in Apogee 
T? souths 11 30 

^:^20. Cap. so. 110 

^d ? lit. 5 in S 



15 


7 6 


15 


7 7 


15 


7 8 


15 


7 9 


14 


7 10 


14 


7 10 


14 


7 11 



47] 25th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 24. 



Day's lenofth 9 hours 38 min. 



22 Sunday 


10 


23 Mond'y 


11 


24 Tues. 


12 


25 Wed. 


13 


26 Thurs. 


14 


27 Friday 


15 


28 Sat. 


16 



Alphonsus 

Clement 

Chrisogenes 

Catharine 

Conrad 

Josaphat 

Guntherus 



2 


1 19 


6 20 


^221 


3 


2 :^8 


7 29 


m 7 


4 


3 41 


8 40 


« 22 


5 


4 31 


9 45 


^ 7 


6 


5 19 


11 4 


^20 


7 


6 7 


morn. 


^ 5 


8 


6 54 


12 6 


^18 



©entersij^ 



d tp> 
d O 
S rises 9 45 
Rigel rises 7 31 
Achernar souths 912 
27. Sir. ris. 9 32 
d ? Super. S 



14 


7 12 


13 


7 13 


13 


7 14 


13 


7 15 


12 


7 15 


12 


7 16 


12 


7 17 



48] 1st Sunday in Advent. 



Matt. 21. 



Day's leno'th 9 hours 26 min. 



29 Sunday 

30 Mond'y 



Saturn 

St. Andrew 



7 43 

8 34 



1 14 

2 29 



^E% 
1^% 



1 
14 



1/ souths 6 6 



18 
19 



IVlOOrSI'S RMASES. 



EASTERN STATES. 

New Moon, 5th, 2 o'clock 29 min. Mom. 
First Quarter 12th, 12 " 42 " 
Full Moon, 20th, 5 " 27 " 
Last Quarter, 27th, 9 " 46 " Even. 



CENTRAL STATES. WESTERN STATES. 

1 o'clock 49 min. Morn. 1 o'clock 09 min. Morn. 

12 " 02 '* " 11th, 11 " 22 " Even. 

4 " 47 " " 4 " 07 " Morn. 

9 " 06 " Even. 8 " 26 " Even. 



Saturn is in conjanction with the Sun on the 13th and cannot be seen. 



9 



WEATHER FORECAST. 

1st frosty, clear; 2d threatening; 3d rain; 4th 
lange; 5tli showers; 6th rainy day; 7th stormy; 8th 
earing, frost; gth fair; loth clouds; nth unsettled; 
!th cloudy, stormy, snow; 13th foggy; 14th colder, 
[ually; 15th snow-squalls; i6th windy, cold; 17th 
lange; l8th clouds; 19th rain; 20th snow-squalls; 
St very cold; 22d windy; 23d raw, cold winds; 24th 
earing; 25th moderating; 26th gloomy day; 27th 
isettled; 28th clouds, fog; 29th change; 30th vari- 
3le. 



iRETHREN COLONIES, ^^^e - are al- 
2 . ready several 



rethren colonies in North Dakota. All members are well 
eased with the country and are desirous of others joining them 
lile lands can be homesteaded or bought on easy terms. (See 
Lge 2 for further information.) 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



29 



r^ r^ 







■■ROZE UP! This will soon be true of everything but the 
1» new IMPROVED CHAIN-STAY FENCE. (See adver- 
tisement on last cover page of this Almanac.) 



54 

52ery cold country. Experience corrects 
Sliany errors. It is enough to say that we 
ke it, that the climate is most healthful, the 
yd very fertile and productive, and that the 
IQJpportunities for making homes and a com- 
)rtable living are much better here than in 
le crowded sections of the East. 

A. B. Peters. 
CandOy N. Dakota, August y, i8g^. 



A VALUABLE HINT. 



My husband," said a physician's wife 
ot long ago, ** chanced to see one day, 
landing on a shelf outside our kitchen win- 
ow, some moulds of jelly cooling for the 
ight's dinner. They were uncovered, as 
ley were out of reach of cats, and in full 
iew of cook's watchful eye; but he ques- 
oned me about them, and asked if it was 
ur usual custom to leave jelly thus unpro- 
icted. I was obliged to reply that, so far 
3 I knew, it was. 'Then,' said he, 'don't 
ou know that when we medical men want 



to secure minute organisms for investiga- 
tion, we expose gelatine to the air or in 
places where we have confined malignant 
germs? The gelatine speedily attracts and 
holds them. I'm afraid your flavored gela- 
tine does the same. Cool the jelly if you 
must, but cover it with a piece of close mus- 
lin.' And we have always done that since 
then." 



THE LITTLE JAPS. 



The Mikado of Japan is seriously dissatis- 
fied with the stature of his people. They 
are too little to suit him, and have not 
enough physical endurance, so he has ap- 
pointed a commission to investigate the 
matter and report what, if any, measures 
should be adopted to rectify the trouble. 
The commission, after investigating the mat- 
ter for a long while, have made a report that 
in their opinion the fault lies in the too ex- 
clusive vegetable diet of the people. Neither 
rice nor fish, which articles constitute the 
main diet of the masses, possesses the sus- 
taining and strengthening power of meat. 
They recommend that the people should be 
put on a meat diet. The government has 
approved the report, and hereafter Japan will 
be a better place for butchers. But an all 
meat diet will not be found good either. A 
mixed diet is what man needs. 



IT SAVES MONEY AND DOCTOR'S BILLS. 



I HAVE used Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and 
Diarrhoea Remedy in my family several times for 
summer complaint, and it has never failed. I can 
recommend it as a safe remedy, that will save doc- 
tor bills and money. — R. B. Bowser, Bolivar, West- 
moreland Co., Pa. 

Persons subject to attacks of bilious colic 
or cholera morbus should always keep this 
remedy at hand. It costs but 25 cents per 
bottle. Druggists and merchants sell it. 



Zeal without meekness is ever like a ship 
at sea, in danger of every rising storm. 



12tli Month. ] 



DECEMBER. 



[Days 31. 



Days & Weeks 



CO 



Remarkable 
Days. 



WTO 



MOON 

Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Lises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs, 
s. D 



flspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



Son ST:j2>q- 
Past Rises & Sets. 
M. H. M. I H. M. 



1 Tues. 


19 


Longinus 


10 


9 29 


3 36 


^5% ^ 1 


5 in Aphelion ^ 


11 


7 19 


4 41 


2 Wed. 


20 


Caiididus 


11 


10 29 


4 48 


«io 


]) in Perigee 


10 


7 20 


4 40 


3 Thurs. 


21 


Cassianus 


12 


11 32 


6 6 


«22 


d 1? J. d lit 3) 


10 


7 20 


4 40 


4 Friday 


22 


L. J. Heatwole, 
born 1852. 


1 


12 37 


]) sets 


m 4 


0%"^' <^ ? 2) 


9 


7 21 


4 39 


5 Sat. 


23 


Abigail 


2 


1 27 


5 19 


^16 


^^71 souths 5 48 


9 


7 21 


4 39 



49] 2d Sunday in Advent. 



Luke 21. 



Day's length 9 hours 18 min. 



6 Sunday 

7 Mond'y 

8 Tues. 

9 Wed. 

10 Thurs. 

11 Friday 

12 Sat. 



24 

25 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



St. Nicliolas 

Agathon 

Cone. V. M. 

Joachim 

Judith 

Barsabas 

Ottilia 



3 


1 59 


6 20 


^28 


3 


2 38 


7 14 


^10 


4 


3 32 


8 16 


^22 


5 


4 20 


9 17 


^ 4 


6 


5 4 


10 20 


^16 


7 


5 45 


11 21 


^28 


7 


6 25 


morn. 


^10 



? sets 5 40 
Orion rises 6 20 

(? W0 

8 SQ 

11. <^so.ll49a 
IF 7 ■•••souths 7 20 



9 


7 22 


8 


7 22 


8 


7 23 


7 


7 23 


7 


7 23 


6 


7 24 


6 


7 24 



38 
38 
37 
37 
37 
36 
36 



50] 3d Sunday in Advent. 



Matt. 11. 



Day's length 9 hours 12 min. 



13 Sundav 


D. 


14 IMond'y 


2 


15 Tues. 


3 


16 Wed. 


4 


17 Thurs. 


5 


18 Friday 


6 


19 Sat. 


7 



Lucian 

Mcasius 

Ignatius 

Emherday 

Lazarus 

Arnoldus 

Abraham 



8 


7 5 


12 24 


S£22 


9 


7 46 


1 26 


^.^ 


10 


8 28 


2 40 


^18 


10 


9 24 


3 57 


^ 1 


11 


10 43 


5 2 


^15 


12 


11 48 


6 12 


^30 


12 


morn. 


]) rises 


^15 



Arietas souths 8 36 
J} in Apogee 
Rigel souths 11 37 
T? souths 5 4 
Achernar so. 7 46 
J^Sirius so. 12 53 

pi9.d<?3).dt|;3) 



24 
24 
24 

25 
25 
25 
25 



36 
36 
36 
35 
35 
35 



51] 4th Sunday in Advent. 



John 1. 



Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



20 Sunday 


8 


21 JMond'y 


9 


22 Tues. 


10 


23 Wed. 


11 


24 Thurs. 


12 


25 Friday 


13 


26 Sat. 


14 



Ammon 

St. Thomas 

Beata 

Dagobert 

Adam, Eve 

Christmas 

Stephen 



1 


12 42 


5 45 


^30 


2 


1 37 


6 15 


«15 


3 


2 28 


7 24 


«30 


4 


3 17 


8 38 


^15 


5 


4 5 


10 49 


^30 


6 


4 52 


11 45 


^14 


7 


5 38 


morn. 


^28 



$ rises 8 14 

Oent-^s^ Shortest Day. fy 
er&f^' Winter Beg. 

? Gr. Hel. Lat. S. 
Capella so. 10 56 
Regulus rises 9 1 
6%l)'ll stationary 

Vega sets 8 54 S 



2 


7 25 


1 


7 26 


1 


7 25 


^ 


7 25 


O- 


7 25 


1 


7 25 


1 


7 25 



35 
34 
35 
35 
35 
35 
35 



52] Sunday after Christmas. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



27 Sunday 

28 IMond'y 

29 Tues. 

30 Wed. 

31 Thurs. 



John Ev. 
H. Innoc'nts 
Noah 
Copernicus 
Sylvester 



8 


6 27 


12 5 


^S ^ 


8 


7 19 


1 6 


J5fe24 


9 


8 14 


2 7 


« 7 


10 


9 14 


3 12 


«19 


11 


10 17 


4 14 


m 1 



27. Sirius s. 7 30 

d blit 
% souths 4 16 
dl?]).dJitJ.])inPerig. 
in Perihelion 



24 
24 
24 
24 
24 



36 
36 
36 
36 



4 36 



IVIOOIM'S PHASES. 



EASTERN STATES. 
New Moon, 4th, 12 o'clock 53 min. Even. 
First Quarter, 11th, 7 '' 31 " 
Full Moon, 19th, 11 " 07 " 
Last Quarter, 27th, 7 " 10 " Morn. 



CENTRAL STATES. WESTERN STATES. 

12 o'clock 13 min. Even. 3d, 11 o'clock 33 min. Morn. 

6 " 51 " " 6 " 11 " Even. 

10 '' 27 " " 9 '• 47 " 

6 " 30 '' Morn. 5 " 50 " Morn. 



Mars is in opposition with the Sun on the 11th, and shines all night. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



31 



&"i 




WEATHER FORECAST. 

ist change; 2d pleasant; 3d frosty; 4th colder; 5th 
rain or snow; 6th blustery; 7th unsettled; 8th snow; 
Qth colder; loth rough day; nth damp day; 12th 
dull; 13th fair; 14th change; 15th clouding; i6th rain, 
sleet, snow; 17th wet day; i8th unfavorable; 19th 
rough day; 20th sleet, snow; 21st cloudy; 22d clear- 
ing; 23d moderate; 24th snow; 25th gloomy, snow; 
26th cloudy; 27th windy day; 28th change; 29th cold 
day; 30th snow; 31st rough day. 



SCHOOLS. 



Ample provision has been made for educa- 
tion in North Dakota. The 16th and 36th 
section in every township are reserved for school purposes, 3,000,- 
000 acres in all, and none of it can be sold under $10.00 an acre, 
and the fund created is to become permanent, only the interest 
being used. No sooner is there a little knot of settlers in any 
locality than their first care is to provide for the education of 
their children, to set up a common school district, and to bring 
themselves within the reach of the advantages of educational 
laws and provisions. (See page 2 for further information.) 

SNOWS FALL DEEP in December, but they never 
drift behind the IMPROVED CHAIN-STAY FENCE. 
(See advertisement on last cover page of this Almanac.) 

THE ANCIENT CIVILIZATION OF PERU. 



A STUDY of the history of Peru [situated 
in the northwestern part of South America] 
must always be interesting, for it was in that 
country that the red race reached its highest 
development, it was there that some of the 
most romantic episodes in the story of the 
Spanish conquest were enacted;' the capital 
of that country became the centre of the 
Spanish colonial power, and it was there 
that the *' colossal fabric of Spanish colonial 
dominion was finally shattered and, in this 
classic land of the Incas, an emancipated 
people have, during more than half a cen- 
tury, been painfully but hopefully strug- 
gling, in the face of many difficulties, to es- 
tablish a national existence based on well 
ordered liberty." 

There has been much discussion as to 
the origin of the red race, but the evidence 
is now conclusive that man has existed on 
this continent from the glacial epoch. " The 



culture of the American race is an indige- 
nous growth, wholly self-developed and 
owing none of its germs to any other race." 
In the year 1874 a mummy was dug up in 
the province of Tarapaca, Peru; it was be- 
neath a volcanic formation of great antiqui- 
ty. This shows that man lived on this con- 
tinent long before any of the supposed mi- 
grations to this country. And the cotton 
twine, the woven bag and cobs of maize 
which were found with the body tell us 
something of the civilization to which the 
race had attained at that remote period. 
The perfection to which the Peruvians had 
brought the cultivation of maize and pota- 
toes, and their domestication of the llama 
and alpaca are convincing proofs of the 
great antiquity of their civilization. 

A skull found in the Inca cemetery in 
the valley of Yucay exhibits a clear case of 
trepanning before death. 

During unnumbered centuries the natives 
of this region were slowly advancing toward 
the highest civilization of which their race 
is capable. The mummy spoken of above 
is not the only proof of an ancient and high 
civilization in Peru. Ruined edifices, many 
of which seem to be uncompleted temples, 
'* of unknown date and origin, built of enor- 
mous stones,^seem to point to a period when 
a powerful empire existed in Peru, long 
before the rise of the Inca dynasty." There 
is barely a tradition of that remote past, 
the ruins being almost the only witnesses 
to the existence of a forgotten but once 
mighty dominion. 

Ruins are found at various places in Pe- 
ru; among the most remarkable are those 
at the southern side of Lake Titicaca, on 
a bleak plateau nearly thirteen thousand 
feet above the level of the sea. These 
ruins have been called Tiahuanaco since the 
dawn of history; they cover about a square 
mile. One of their most striking features 
is the monolithic doorway carved out of 
trachytic rock, seven feet high by thirteen 
and one-half in length, and one and one- 



32 



Brethren's Fmnily Almanac, 



half feet thick. The whole upper part from 
a line with the lintel of the portal is cov- 
ered with sculpture. In the centre there 
is a figure angularly but boldly cut in high 
relief, the head surrounded by rays, a scep- 
tre clasped in each hand, terminating in the 
head of a condor. On either side of this 
central compartment, there are three tiers 
of figures, forty-eight in all, each in a kneel- 
ing posture and facing toward the large 
central figure. All are winged and hold 
sceptres terminating in condor's heads; 
those in the central tier having condor's 
heads, and those in the upper and lower 
tiers having crowned human heads. This 
sculpture commemorates some great act of 
homage either to a deity or a mighty sov- 
ereign. Among the other remains at Tia- 
hu-a-naco there are hewn stones thirty-six 
and twenty-six feet long, remains of walls 
composed of enormous blocks of stone, 
large stones standing on end, and colossal 
statues are described by the early writers. 
There was no memory respecting these 
ruins at the time of the Spanish conquest 
and they remain an enigma to this day. 
But they point to the existence of the capi- 
tal of a mighty empire on this spot in very 
remote times, although the establishment 
of such a centre of power on a bleak plateau 
at so great an elevation abovt the level of 
the sea is a phenomenon without any par- 
allel in the history of the world. 

All around are evidences that a highly 
civilized people lived at Tiahuanaco at some 
prehistoric time. In the rudest buildings, 
as paving in the most squalid courts are 
great numbers of beautifully cut stones. 
From these ruins have been taken stone for 
some of the buildings now standing in the 
village, for other villages of the valley, and 
for the cathedral of La Paz, twenty leagues 
distant. The monuments of the past have 
furnished most of the material for the pub- 
lic buildings, the bridges and the highways 
of the present day. 

One heap of ruins has been called the | 



" Temple " and another the " Fortress." 
This latter is very interesting, for on its sum- 
mit are sections of the foundations of build- 
ings. All over the slopes of the Fortress 
are found large and regular blocks of stone, 
sculptured with portions of elaborate de- 
signs, which would appear only when the 
blocks were fitted together. In some places 
the lower wall is standing nearly as it was 
built, and here we can see how it was con- 
structed. ** In the first place, large, upright 
stones were planted in the ground, appar- 
ently resting on stone foundations. They 
are about ten feet above the surface, accu- 
rately faced, perfectly aligned, and inclining 
slightly inwards towards the mound. They 
are placed seventeen feet apart from centre 
to centre, and are very nearly uniform in 
size, generally about three feet broad and 
two feet in thickness. Their edges are cut 
to present shoulders The space be- 
tween the upright stones is filled in with 
a wall of carefully worked stones. Those 
next the pilasters are cut with a shoulder 
to fit the pilaster they adjoin; and they are 
each, moreover, cut with alternate grooves 
and projections, like mortise and tenon, so 
as to fit immovably into each other hori- 
zontally. Vertically they are held in posi- 
tion by round holes drilled into the bottom 
and top of each stone at exact correspond- 
ing distances, in which, there is reason to 
believe, were placed pins of bronze. We 
here see the intelligent devices of a people 
unacquainted with the uses of cement to 
give strength and permanence to their struc- 
tures." 

Tradition says that beneath this mound 
are large vaults filled with treasure, and that 
here begins a subterranean passage which 
leads to Cuzco, more than four hundred 
miles away. But the most recent investiga- 
tion has been unable to find this passage or 
the vaults. 

There are many objects of interest scat- 
tered around. Some carved figures, sup- 
posed to have been idols, were found by 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



33 



pe of the early travelers. Columns cut 
p)m stone are there too. Some of them 

le said to resemble the Doric column, 
irge blocks of stone, cut in different 
apes, are to be seen. There is one slab 
irteen feet and four inches square and 
enty inches thick. It has been called the 
mbolic slab, though no one knows of 
lat it is symbolical. 

About all that can be said of these ruins 
that they are there and have been there 
ice the time of the earliest tradition, 
'hether they are remains of buildings 
ected by some race which had disappeared 
fore the rise of the Incas, or whether 
me of the early Incas erected them, is a 
lestion which we can never decide with 
rtainty. But the best authorities are of 
e opinion that the ruins are much older 
an the house of the Incas. One very 
rong proof of this is that in some places 
e foundations on which the buildings of 
e Incas stand are much older than the 
Hidings themselves, and of a different 
orkmanship. Such, for example, are the 
ins at OUantaytambo. 

On the island of Titicaca are vestiges of 
ica civilization; a temple of the sun and 
royal palace are found here, while on the 
and of Coati stands the famous palace of 
e Virgins of the Sun, built around two 
irises dedicated to the Sun and the Moon, 
his palace is said to be one of the best- 
•eserved as well as one of the most re- 
arkable remains of aboriginal architecture 
1 this continent. Near the northern end 
■ the island of Titicaca is the most cele- 
•ated and the most sacred spot of Peru. 
Here is the rock on which it was believed 
) bird would light or animal ve;:ture, on 
hich no human being dared to place his 



ot; whence the 



sun 



rose to dispel the 



•imal vapors and illume the world; which 
as plated all over with gola and silver, and 
)vered, except on occasions of the most 
lemn festivals, with a veil of cloth of rich- 
t color and material; which sheltered the 



favorite children of the Sun, and the pon- 
tiff, priest, and king who founded the Inca 
empire." 

The ruins of Peru seem to testify that the 
Incas had made most progress in architec- 
ture. They knew how to handle immense 
stones, for in the outer wall of the fortress 
Sacsahuaman, near Cuzco, stones fifteen 
feet long, twelve wide and ten thick are 
common; one stone there measures twenty- 
seven feet in length, fourteen feet in 
breadth, and twelve feet in thickness. Prog- 
ress had also been made in the arts; gold 
was obtained by washing the sands of the 
rivers, silver from the ore by means of blast 
furnaces; vases were made for the temples 
and the Incas; garments were interwoven 
with gold or made of gold thread; woolen 
and cotton cloths and tapestry were worked 
in complicated but graceful patterns and 
colored with brilliant colors. Much pottery 
is found buried with the dead. The shapes 
are remarkable for their grace and elegance, 
and there is a certain severity and simplici- 
ty in the Inca style which contrasts most 
strikingly with the exuberant fancy of the 
potters of a different race on the coast of 
Peru. The llama was the only animal imi- 
tated in pottery by the artists of Cuzco. 
The greater part of the Centeno collection, 
made at Cuzco but now in Berlin, consists 
of vases and drinking cups of graceful de- 
sign. Some of the vases measure over three 
feet in height. They are generally encir- 
cled by simple geometric patterns in bands, 
and sometimes with rows of birds and in- 
sects in minute designs. Some are mold- 
ed in the form of human faces and show so 
much individual character as to lead to the 
impression that they are portraits. A vase 
representing the cocoa harvest is in the 
form of a sitting woman with cocoa branch- 
es and leaves about her. It is probable that 
their finest works were in the precious met- 
als, and these were melted down by the 
conquerors. 

These, concerning which the facts were 



34 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



gleaned from some of the best authorities, 
are only a few of the many objects of inter- 
est that have been discovered, but space 
forbids us to mention more of them. Yet 
these are enough to give us a very good 
idea of the advancement that had been 
made by the red man on this continent long 
before it was settled by persons from across 
the water. And they are enough, too, to 
make us wish it were possible to know more 
about this practically unknown race. 

Grant Mahan. 
Mount Morris College. 




THE BIRD- CHARMER OF THE TLTILERIES. 



BIRDS KNOW THEIR FRIENDS. 



God made man to have dominion over 
the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the 



air, and the cattle after their kind, and ove 
all the earth, and over every creeping thin 
that creepeth on the earth. " So God crea 
ed man in his own image'' (Gen. 1:26, 27 
as a rider and lord to the brute creatioi 
which we may suppose looks up to man i 
to its god and king. And if man had behave 
himself properly, and ruled in righteousne: 
and love, the brute creation might ha^ 
been his willing servants and his peacefi 
happy companions. But man became 
rebel against God and a tyrant and torme: 
tor over the creatures he was appointe 
to rule. So, instead of being to them in tl 
place of a god he oft( 
fills the place of a dev 
Even a beautiful, brigh 
winged bird can hard 
pour out a song 
praise and melody, b 
some brutal little wret( 
will up with a stone 
out with a shot gun ai 
try to kill it. If peop 
would only treat Got 
creatures kindly th 
would find them ot 
dient servants and Ic 
ing subjects. 

One of the sights, 
Paris used to be 
woman who daily f 
the birds in the garde 
of the Tuileries. 
one seemed to kn< 
her, and she spoke to 
one, but she confin 
herself to feeding 1 
birds. A corresponds 
of the Philadelpl 
Telegraph thus describ 
this friend of the bir 
" Crossing the Tui 
ries Garden on one 
the late mild days, my attention was 
tracted by an immense commotion amc 
the sparrows which abound in that local 
They were chattering and flying to and ] 



^0 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



35 



)V( 



101 



and finally collected in swarms at a single 
point. There I saw the cause of their agita- 
eaftion, the well-known bird-charmer of the 
Tuileries Garden. She is a person about 
thirty years of age, pale, with very black 
hair, dressed in the deepest mourning and 
wearing no bonnet. She was surrounded 
by birds that hopped and perched right at 
her feet, or flew circling round her head, 
apparently without the slightest fear. 

She would hold out a bit of bread, and 
instantly three ©r four would hover around 
it with rapidly whirling wings, like hum- 
iielming birds around a flower, some perching 
on her fingers, while others would peck at 
I the coveted morsel on the wing. Then she 
^' would throw crumbs into the air, which 
^'^^ would be adroitly caught by the swiftest- 
levi winged birds before they reached the 
\ ground. A shower of crumbs brought the 
little creatures to her feet like chickens, nor 
did the presence of the by-standers, who 
soon collected in great numbers, appear to 
terrify her proteges in the least. They 
ret( seemed to feel perfectly secure in the pres- 
ence of their benefactress. She walked 
slowly on, followed and surrounded by 
hundreds of the eager, fluttering birds. 



nai 



Go( 



BRETHREN, 



Send to the address below for particulars of the Dos Palos 

Colony of California. You are exactly the kind of people that 

are suited to such a colony, and the conditions surrounding the 

500 people now there are just what your families want. By the 

ft nature of your education you are impelled to a quiet, thoughtful, 

social life. You are not apt to become excited over schemes of 

money-making and are content to be rewarded with satisfactory 

results from your labor. There is no speculation in the Dos 

. Palbs Colony. Our people have not gone there to get rich on the 

^^ rise in land values, nor to make quick fortunes in raising fruit. 

We do not need much capital here to make a start. We can 
keep a cow and calf the entire year on one acre. We can raise 
pork more easily than in the East or West. We raise nearly 
everything we eat and have a great abundance of fruit. Each 
mtwenty-acre farm is irrigated and the canals have an abundance 
of fish in them. Elder Aaron Julius preaches to the people and 
will be glad to answer your questions if you will write to him. 

Many families of the Brethren are now thinking of settling 
there. The Dos Palos Colony of Central Califoriiia will undoubt- 
edly contain the largest Brethren's community in California in a 
few years, because the people there live the kind of industrial life 
most in accordance with the teaching of the Brotherhood. Either 
Elder Aaron Julius or B. Marks will be glad to address any con- 
\aS jgregation of the Brethren anywhere in the United States on farm 
life with irrigation in California. 
For maps, etc., write to 

B. MARKS, 

i. Box 175. Omaha, Nebr. 



100,000 Bushels Corn Wanted 



Everybody who has corn can dispose of it by 
sending loc to S. E. DUBBEL, Waynesboro, Pa., 
for a box of DUjBBEL'S DOUBLE QUICK CORN 
CURE, the surest remedy in the world to remove 
Corns, Warts, Bunions, etc. Why suffer the torture 
of Corns when a loc box will take all you have, as 
one to three applications removes the Corn? Sent by 
mail on receipt of price. Agents wanted in every 
locality to sell this remedy. Live agents can make 
from $3 to $5 a day. 

Also agents wanted to sell DUBBEL'S HOUSE- 
HOLD REMEDIES, namely : 

Dubbel's Double Discovery, the most reliable 

family medicine to strengthen and build up the system, purify 
the blood, invigorate the Liver and cure Constipation, etc. 
Price, 50 cents and ^i.oo per bottle. 

Red Thyme Pain Cure, the champion of medicines 
to cure Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dysentery, Pains in 
Stomach and Bowels, Colic (either for man or beast), Sprains, 
Sores, Aches, Pains, etc. Thousands of people speak in 
praise of Red Thyme Pain Cure. Price, 25 cents per bottle. 

Dubbel's Cough and Croup Cure will cure any case 

of Croup that any doctor can cure, and has cured many cases 
when doctors failed. It is the leading Cough and Croup 
remedy. Price, 25 cents. 

Blue Mountain Bitters, the woman's friend. This 
is a splendid remedy for women, for Weakness, Dizziness, 
Nervousness, etc., etc. Price, 50 cents. 

DubbePs Carbolic Ointment cures Piles after other 

remedies fail. And for Skin Eruptions, Sores, Burns, 
Scalds, etc., its equal cannot be found. Price, 25 cents. 

Menthane Vermifuge, the child's friend, expels 

worms without pain; the surest remedy and the most pleasant 
to take. Never disappoints. Price, 25 cents. 

DubbeFs Fruit Juice Pills, the traveler's friend, 
because they move the bowels as gently as fruit. They tone 
up the Liver and relieve you of that dizzy, tired feeling ; 
especially adapted to people who require a gentle cathartic. 
Price, 25 cents. 

DubbePs Flavoring Extracts of Vanilla, Lemon, 

Cinnamon, Orange, Wintergreen and Peppermint are the 
strongest, purest and best. Three times as strong as many 
others. Once used, always used. 

For an order of an assortment of my remedies 
amounting to $2.75 cash with order, I will give either 
Mrs. Miller's book, " Letters to the Young," or D. L. 
Miller's book, " Seven Churches of Asia," free as a 
present. Also, will give enough medicine free to pay 
freight charges. This is an introductory offer to such 
as have not used my remedies. Address, 

S. E. DUBBEL, 
Waynesboro, Franklin Co., Pa. 



36 



Brethretis Family Almanac. 



SHOEMAKEI^'S 




L\C 




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DID YOU SEE IT? 




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before. It is finely illustrated with 
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Illustrations for this particular work. 



Every One Should Have a Copy. 



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ADDRESS: 



TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:-Being well 
acquainted with Mr. C. C. SHOEMAKER, 
and believing him to do just as he promises, 
we cheerfully recommend him to the read- 
ers of the Almanac as one with whom it is 
a pleasure to transact business.— .5r<?/Ar^»'j' 
Publishing Company, Mount Morris, III. 



C. C. SHOEMAKER, 

Freeport, Illinois. 



N. B.— A fine 32=page Catalogue of our Incubators anc 
Brooders sent to any address free. Our Machines 
are the best on the market. 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



37 



IVs/dllltTISTIEI^/IJLIj LIST. 



f 



SWEDEN. 

Anderson, Andreas, Limhamn 

Anderson, W. Malmberg 

iGustafson, Alfred Wanneberga 

Jenson, Per, Wanneberga 

Ohlsson, Hans, Malmo 

Olin, O. P Kjeflinge 

Risberg, Jans, Kjeflinge 

DENMARK. 

Eskildsen, C. C Hjorring 

Gespersen, Peter S., Hiredum 

Hansen, Christian, Roskilde 

Johansen, Martin, Hierdum 

Poulson, P. C Frederickshavn 

INDIA. 
Stover, W.B 

. . . Bulsar, Presidency of Bombay 

ASIA MINOR. 
Fercken, G. J., Smyrna 

UNITED STATES. 

Abernathy, I. W., . Wilson's Mills, W. Va 
Abernathy, J. W., . Wilson's Mills, W. Va 

Adkins, J. M Cabool, Texas, Mo 

Ahner, Jacob, 251 Walton Ave., . . 

Ft. Wayne, Ind 

Akers, Dr. R. T., Alum Ridge, Floyd, Va 
Albaugh, J. E., . Olney, Shiawassee, Mich 
Albright, Wm., . . Steamboat Rock, Iowa 

Aldinger, Jacob, York, Pa 

Allen, H. C, . Snowflake, Hawkins, Tenn 
Allison, David, .... Lee's X Roads, Pa 

Amick; Joseph, Mt. Morris, 111 

Anderson, George, . . . Snowflake, Tenn 
Andes, Levi, . . . Newton, Harvey, Kans 
Anglemyer, John, Nappanee, Elkhart, Ind 

Angle, Lee Bonbrook, Va 

Annon, Zechariah, . . . Thornton, W. Va 
Annon, George, Thornton, Taylor, W. Va 
Anthony, Wm., . Clay Hill, Franklin, Pa 

Anthony, F. D 

.... Startown, Washington, Md 

Appleman, John, Plymouth, Ind 

Appleman, Jacob, .... Clarkson, Okla 
Argabright, I. H., . . . New Hope, W. Va 
Arnold, Perry A., . . . . Metamore, Ohio 
Arnold, Whitmore, Somerset, Perry, Ohio 
Arnold, D. B., Burlington, Mineral, W.Va 
Arnold, G. S., Burlington, Mineral, W. Va 
Arnold, Peter, Burlington, Mineral, W. Va 

Arnold, A. C McPherson, Kans 

Arnold, C. E., McPherson, Kans 

Arnold, John, .... Lintner, Piatt, 111 
Armentrout, G. W., Dighton, Lane, Kans 
Auker, Joseph, .... McAlisterville, Pa 

Aultland, Daniel York, Pa 

Austin, A. W., Cushing, Okla 

C Ausherman, David, . . . Burkittsville, Md 

Babylon, Emmanuel, . . Westminster, Md 

Badger, Robert, . . Panther, Dallas, Iowa 

Uj Badger, Samuel, . . Panther, Dallas, Iowa 

. Baer, M. T., . . Mount View, Benton, Mo 

'"^Bagwell, E. B Alpha, Greene, Ohio 

J5^br, Jacob, ,,,... Isabel, Lane, Ore 



Bailey, John P., . Mt. Etna, Adams, Iowa 
Baker, David, . . . Shepherdsville, Mich 
Baker, D., . Stephens City, Frederick, Va 

Baker, D.M Waynesboro, Pa 

Baker, Levi, . . Olney, Shiawassee, Mich 

Baker, H. C East Pepin, Wis 

Baker, Samuel H., . . . Luddington, Wis 

Baker, J H Leeseburg, Fulton, 111 

Baker, J. S Everett, Bedford, Pa 

Baker, Adam, Shady Grove, Franklin, Pa 
Baker, Raphael, Gormania, Grant, W. Va 
Baker, H. M., . West Newton, Allen, Ohio 
Baker, David H., Abbottstown, Adams, Pa 

Baker, N. R Fruitdale, Ala 

Bakener, Fred, . . . Leaf River, Ogle, 111 

Bare, John, Decatur, Burt, Nebr 

Barkdoll, Harvey M., . . Warrenville, 111 
Barklow, Samuel S 

Moscow, Latah, Idaho 

Barklow, Thomas, Myrtle Point, Coos, Ore 
Barnes, Flemmon, . Brandonville, W. Va. 
Barnes, John, . . . Soho, Berkeley, W. Va 
Barnhart, A., .... Wirtz, Franklin, Va 
Barnhart, John, . . . Mansfield, Piatt, 111 
Barnhart, C, . . . . Mansfield, Piatt, 111 
Barnhart, J. W., . . . Wirtz, Franklin, Va 
Barnhart, Jeremiah, . Junta, Franklin, Va 

Barnhart, O., Hylton, Va 

Barnhart, W. W Dayton, Ohio 

Barnhart, Jacob, . Twelve Mile, Cass, Ind 
Barnhart, D. B., . . . . Appanoose, Kans 
Barnhart, George, . Carthage, Jasper, Mo 

Barnhart, A. B Hagerstown, Md 

Barnhizer, Isaac, Tilton, Poweshiek, Iowa 
Barnthouse, Jasper, . . Markleysburg, Pa 
Barrick, Isaac, .... Portland, Jay, Ind 
Barton, James, . . Corunna. De Kalb. Ind 

Barto, Isaac, Griffin, Md 

Barwick, H. M., 

. . . West Alexandria, Preble, Ohio 

Bashor, John Bashor's Mill, Tenn 

Bashor, Conrad, . . . Bashor's Mill, T6nn 
Bashor, Joseph, . . Platteville, Weld, Colo 
Bashor, Daniel, Holmesville, Gage, Nebr 
Bashor, Jol^n R., . Evendale, Juniata, Pa 
Bashor, M. M., . . . Sodaville, Linn, Ore 
Basket, B. S., . . Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 
Baugher, Aaron, . . . Codorus, York, Pa 
Baumbaugh, J. S., 

.... Moonlight, Dickinson, Kans 
Beahm, Henry, . . . Lowry, Bedford, Va 
Beahm, I. N. H., . . . . Winchester, Va 

Beahm, S. P Bedford City, Va 

Beahm, J. C, . . . . Lowry, Bedford, Va 

Beagle, Eli, x\da, Hardin, Ohio 

Beagle, Howard J., Petroleum, Wells, Ind 
Beale, Jesse, . Waterloo, Blackhawk, Iowa 

Beam, Joseph, Ligonier, Pa 

Beam, Wm De Graff, Logan, Ohio 

Bear, David, Pearland, Texas 

Beashoar, Andrew, . . Oakland Mills, Pa 
Beaver, S. S., . McAlisterville, Juniata, Pa 
Beaver, John L., Mifflinburg, Union, Pa 
Beaver, Adam, . . . Hartleton, Union, Pa 
Beaver, O. J., . . . Fredericksburg, Iowa 
Beaver, Isaiah Lochiel, Urjipn, Pa 



Bechtelheimer, D., . Young America, Ind 

Beck, Jonas, Astoria, Fulton, Hi 

Becker, G. S., . . . Deodate, Dauj^, Pa 
Beckner, Perry, .... Filley, Gage, Nebr 
Beckner, E. L., . . . Argos, Marshall. Ind 

Beeghly, John W Dayton, Ohio 

Beeghly, Josiah, Sabetha, Kans 

Beeghly, Jeremiah, Accident, Garrett, Md 
Beelman, Adam, . . Chicago, Huron, Ohio 
Beelman, Henry, . . Dillsburg, York, Pa 

Beer. J. H Rockton, Pa 

Beery, Jacob D Augusta, W. Va 

Beery, P. H., Greencastle, Ind 

Bennett, John, . . . Artemas, Bedford, Pa 
Berkeybile, Aaron, Dubois, Pawnee, Nebr 

Berkeybile, D., Delta, Ohio 

Berkey, Isaac, . . . Goshen, Elkhart, Ind 

Berkey, Joseph, Hillsboro, Pa 

Berkley, Josiah, . . . Glade, Somerset, Pa 

Berkley, Albert, Johnstown, Pa 

Berkman, Hiram, . Fredric, Monroe, Iowa 
Berry, Thomas, . . Otis. Hawkins, Tenn 

Betts, David, Montgomery, Kans 

Beverage, Levi, . . . Clover Lick, W. Va 
Beverage, Josiah, Monterey, Highland, Va 
Billheimer, Isaac, .... Edna Mills, Ind 
Bingaman, A. L., . Cerro Gordo, Piatt, 111 

Bingaman, Wm., La Place, 111 

Bixler, Uriah, Westminster, Md 

Biser, Solomon, .... Burlington, W. Va 
Blessing, S. A., . . Kewanna, Fulton, Ind 
Blickenstaff, Solomon, . . . Rossville, Ind 
Blocher, S. W., . Greenville, Darke, Ohio 
Blough, J. W., Hooversville, Somerset, Pa 
Blough, E. J., . . . . Stanton's Mills, Pa 
Blough, Valentine, . . Bills, Somerset, Pa 

Blough, S. S Johnstown, Pa 

Blough, J. E., Manassas, Va 

Blough, A. P Waterloo, Iowa 

'Bock, Daniel, . . Ridgeway, Howard, Ind 

Boggs, William, Covington, Ohio 

Bollinger, B. B., . . . Shipshewanna, Ind 

Bomberger, Cyrus, Lebanon, Pa 

Bond, Thomas, . . French Creek, W. Va 

Bond, Wm., White, Fayette, Pa 

Bonewitz, John Myrtle Point, Ore 

Bonsack, Charles, . . . Westminster, Md 
Borough, William, . . North Liberty, Ind 

Book, Isaac, Warble, Juniata, Pa 

Book, Edmund, Blain, Perry, Pa 

Bookwalter, L. A Trotwood, Ohio 

Boon, John O., . Waidsboro, Franklin, Va 
Boon, Samuel, . Carleysville, P^oanoke, Va 
Booz, Jacob, Salfordville, Montgomery, Pa 
Boothe, Noah, . . Alum Ridge, Floyd, Va 

Boothe, Peter Big Tunnel, Va 

Bosely, David Bulltown, W. Va 

Bosserman, Eleazar, Mt. Blanchard, Ohio 
Bosserman, Levi D., .... Robins, Iowa 

Bosserman, Wm. P Karoma, Okla 

Bowers, Peter, Parkersburg, III 

Bowers, David, . Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 
Bowers, Philander, . . . Franklin, W. Va 

Bowers, A. J., St. Joseph, 111 

Bowman, J. W Millville, Henry, Ind 

Bowman, Daniel, .... Burr Oak, Kans 



38 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



Bowman, Jacob, .... Hagerstown, Ind 

Bowman, D. E Hagerstown, Ind 

Bowman, D Glensted, Morgan, Mo 

Bowman, Peter, . Little River, Floyd, Va 
Bowman, Geo. C, . . Boon's Creek, Tenn 
BovC^rtan, Joseph, .... Jonesboro, Tenn 
BowiSm, John J., . . New Lebanon, Ohio 
Bowman, Daniel, . . . Dillon's Mills, Va 
Bowman, Geo., . . Junta, Franklin, Va 
Bowman, Isaac, . . Taccio, Franklin, Va 
Bowman, Abraham, . . Hagerstown, Ind 
Bowman, Daniel F., . Johnson City, Tenn 
Bowman, Samuel, .... Flourville, Tenn 
Bowman, John P., . . . Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Bowser, Wm., Dayton, Ohio 

Bowser, G. W., . Arcadia, Hamilton, Ind 
Bowser, Samuel, . . Ankeny, Polk, Iowa 

Bowser, Daniel, Peru, Ind 

Bowser, J, J., . Cleveland, Kingman, Kans 

Boyd, C. L Cornelia, Johnson, Mo 

Boyd, A. L., . Brazilton, Crawford, Kans 
Boyer, Allen, .... Lena, Stephenson, 111 
Boyer, S. J., . . Buena Vista, Monroe, Ind 
Boyer, Ralph, . Keelville, Cherokee, Kans 
Bradshaw, John, Brummett's Creek, N. C 
Bradley, E. J., . . . . Saluda, Polk. N. C 

Bradley. F. H Canton, Kans 

Bradt, Wm., . . . Carthage, Jasper, Mo 
Brallier, Simon, . . . Spencer, Clay, Iowa 
Brallier, H. H., Pierceton, Kosciusko, Ind 
Branson, Hiram, . Muncie, Delaware, Ind 
Branson, Isaac E., Muncie, Delaware, Ind 

Branscom, Geo. A., Clover, N. C 

Braucher, Urias D., .... Somerset, Pa 

Bray, W. T La Due, Henry, Mo 

Breshears, Burr E., • Avery, Benton, Mo 
Bricker, G. W., . . . Darkesville, W. Va 

Bricker, Jacob, Keedysville, Md 

Brickey, Allen, . . Genson, Sebastine, Ark 
Bridge, Albert, . . Monticello, White, Ind 
Bright, J, Calvin, . . New Lebanon, Ohio 
Brilhart, John A., Rockton, Clearfield, Pa 
Brilhart, D., . . . . Loganville, York, Pa 

Brindle, Cyrus, Carlisle, Pa 

Brindle, John, . . . Martinsburg, W. Va 

Britton, Joseph F., Bristow, Va 

Broadwater, J., . . . Greenleafton, Minn 
Brooks, H, F., Stauffer, Westmoreland, Pa 
Brooks, J. W., .... Warrensburg, Mo 
Brough, Andrew, .... New Chester, Pa 
Brough, John, . . East Berlin, Adams, Pa 

Brough, Jacob A., Galva, Kans 

Browcr, Jacob, . . . South English, Iowa 
Brower, C. M., . . . South English, Iowa 
Brower, David, . . Talent, Jackson, Ore 

Brower, E. L., Waynesboro, Va 

Browcr, Isaac U., . . . Setzler's Store, Pa 
Brower, Alfred, . . . Dale, Guthrie, Iowa 
Brower, John, . . Dorrance, Russell, Kans 
Brower, Joseph, . . . Denver, Miami, Ind 
Brower, S. F., . . . . South English, Iowa 
Brower, Peter, . . . South English, Iowa 

Brower, D. M Ashland, Ore 

Brown, Wm. F., . . . Bashor's Mill, Tenn 
Brown, Jeremiah, . . . New Windsor, Md 
Brown, John, . . . Bryan, Williams, Ohio 
Brown, S. M., .... Garden Plain, Kans 
Brown, Peter, . . East Berlin, Adams, Pa 
Brown, Adam, . . East Berlin, Adams, Pa 
Brown, Charles C, . . . . Abilene, Kans 
Brown, Jacob K., Woodbury, Bedford, Pa 



Brown, C. H., . Navarre, Dickinson, Kans 
Brouhard, Harvey, Mina, Marshall, Kans 
Brubaker, Henry T., . Chase, Rice, Kans 
Brubaker, A., . . . . Gratis, Preble, Ohio 
Brubaker, John, Morelock, Greene, Tenn 

Brubaker, Jonathan, Virden, 111 

Brubaker, J. O., . . . Crescent City, Okla 
Brubaker, D. E., . Panther, Dallas, Iowa 
Brubaker, David, . . . Loudonville, Ohio 
Brubaker, Henry, . . . McPherson, Kans 
Brubaker, J. S., . . . Merced, Merced, Cal 
Brubaker, Louis E., . . . . Hickman, Va 

Brubaker, S. F., Farmersville, 111 

Brubaker, Joseph, . . . Little Rock, Mo 
Brubaker, D. R., . . Salem, Roanoke, Va 
Brubaker, Moses E., . Lyons, Rice, Kans 
Brubaker, Isaac S., . Mitchell, Rice, Kans 
Brubaker, Noah F., . Sawyer, Pratt, Kans 
Brubaker, C. C, . Roanoke, Woodford, 111 
Brubaker, D. M., . . . Weilersville, Ohio 

Brubaker, J. H Virden, 111 

Brubaker, Christian, .... Neflsville, Pa 
Brubaker, Ellis S., . . . Peru, Miami, Ind 
Brubaker, Jonathan, Mitchell, Rice, Kans 
Brumbaugh, M. G., . . . Huntingdon, Pa 
Brumbaugh, J. B., . . . . Huntingdon, Pa 
Brumbaugh, Jesse K., . . Union, Ohio 

Brumbaugh, Geo., Grafton, Pa 

Brumbaugh, John, Grafton, Pa 

Brumbaugh, H. B., . . . Huntingdon, Pa 
Brumbaugh, John H., . . . Clayton, Ohio 
Brumbaugh, James D., Box 16, . . 

Martinsburg, Blair, Pa 

Brumbaugh, G. B., . . . James Creek, Pa 

Brumbaugh, L. R., Denton, Md 

Brumbaugh, J. B., . . . Clover Creek, Pa 
Brumbaugh, G. W., . . Clover Creek, Pa 
Brumbaugh, A., Gettysburg, Darke, Ohio 
Brumbaugh, Jacob, . . . Pittsburgh, Ohio 
Bruner, Ed. S , . . . . Frederick City, Md 
Brunk, Henry, . Greentown, Howard, Ind 

Bucher, Geo Kleinfeltersville, Pa 

Bucher, Christian, . . . Shaefferstown, Pa 
Bucher, Cyrus, .... Astoria, Fulton, 111 
Bucher, N. F., . . Rudy, Roanoke, W. Va 
Buck, C. L., . . . . . New Enterprise, Pa 
Bucklew, Solomon, . . Canton, Fulton, 111 

Buckley, J. S., . Girard, 111 

Buckmaster, G. W., Carlisle, Lonoke, Ark 

Bueghly, Martin, Waterloo, Iowa 

Burall, Jesse M., .... New Market, Md 
Burger, S. J., . . Baltic, Tuscarawas, Ohio 
Burget, A. B., . . Clover Creek, Blair, Pa 

Burcham, Wm Noblcsville, Ind 

Burket, Samuel E., . . . Sevastopol, Ind 
Burghart, Peter, .... Centre View, Mo 
Burkhart, Jos. S., Johnstown, Cambria, Pa 
Burnett. P. R., Caldwell, St. Francis, Ark 
Burk, Charles, . . . New Interest, W. Va 

Bussard, Wm., Milford, Ind 

Butcher, Wm., . . Cedarville, Cedar, Mo 
Butterbaugh, J. W., .... Laurens, Iowa 
Buterbaugh, J. O., Martinsburg, W. Va 

Buzzard, John M., Ellerton, Md 

Bycrly, David, .... Lima, Allen, Ohio 

Byers, David Canton, Stark, Ohio 

Cakerice, John, . . . Conrad Grove, Iowa 
Caldwell. L. D.. . Mathias. Hardy, W. Va 
Calvert, W. Q., . May Hill, Adams, Ohio 

Calvert, Wm Bell, Highland, Ohio 

Calvert, Joseph G., . Sterling, Rice, Kans 



Campbell, James A., . . . . Mt. View, Mo 
Campbell, D. C, . . . Colfax, Clinton, Ind 

Campbell, John F Idlewood, 111 

Capron, Oliver, . . Lakeside, Pulaski, Ind 

Carrell, Geo Big Tunnel, Va 

Carl, Geo. C Centraha, Wash 

Carter, Harvey, (col.), . . Frankfort, Ohio 
Carper, George, .... Middlebury, Ohio 
Catlins, William N., . . . New Hope, Ind 
Cassel, F. P., Landsdale, Montgomery, Pa 

Castle, C. W., Brownsville, Md 

Caylor, Abraham, .... Greentown, Ind 

Caylor, John H., Noblesville, Ind 

Caylor, D. S., . . . Keystone, Wells, Ind 
Chambers, J. W., . . Brice. Gratiot, Mich 

Chambers, Andrew, Midland, Va 

Chambers, D., . . . Brice, Gratiot, Mich 
Chemberlen, Geo. F., . . . . Puente, Cal 
Christian, John H., . . . Gettysburg, Ohio 
Christner, N. B., . .. . Milford Station, Pa 
Christner, Amos, Gebhart's, Somerset, Pa 
Claar. Michael, . . Claysburg, Blair, Pa 

Claar, J. C, Queen, Bedford, Pa 

Claar, Abram J., . . . Queen, Bedford, Pa 
Clanahan, John, . St. David's Church, Va 
Clapper, John, Great Bend, Barton, Kans 
Clapper, D. S., . Galva, McPherson, Kans 
Clapper, Henry, .... Yellow Creek, Pa 
Clapper, Daniel, . Louisville, Stark, Ohio 
Clark, Dennis, . Maysville, Grant, W. Va 

Clark, Jesse, Telford, Tenn 

Clark, Wm., Johnson City, Tenn 

Clark, Wm. H., . . Sheridan, Worth, Mo 
Clayborn, Forney, . . . Parkersburgh, 111 
Claypool, H. S., Salt Lick Bridge. W. Va 
Cleaver, Geo., Curwensville, Clearfield, Pa 
Clemens, G. W., .... Stett, Carroll, Mo 

Click, J. W., Bridgewater, Va 

Click, Samuel, . . . Nevada, Vernpn, Mo 

Click, D. M Fort Collins, Colo 

Cline, Joseph M Fort Defiance, Va 

Cline, John, . . Long Glade, Augusta, Va 
Cline, Samuel, .... Stephens City, Va 
Cline, J. F., . . Goodland, Sherman, Kans 
Cline, Geo., .... Kempton, Tipton, Ind 
Coate, David, . . . Celina, Mercer, Ohio 
Cober, Ephraim, Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 

Cobb, E. M North Manchester, Ind 

Cochran, Martin Toll Gate, W. Va 

Coffman, H. C. N„ . . South English, Iowa 

Coffman, J. M Roanoke, La 

Colebank, Wm. J., Russell, Nebr 

Colebank, Marshall, .... Farnam, Nebr 

Collins, Benj Greenbank, W. Va 

Conley, Lafayette. . . . Jonesboro, Tenn 
Connell, B. F., Brooklyn, Poweshiek, Iowa 

Conner, I. L Morrill, Kans 

Connor, Abram Manassas, Va 

Connor, Jacob Grater's Ford. Pa 

Cook, W. G., . Bijou Hills, Brule, S. Dak 
Cook, Henry, Union City, Randolph, Ind 
Cook, Hezekiah, . . Dillsburg, York, Pa 

Coover, J. C, McPherson, Kans 

Coover, David, . . Cicero, Defiance, Ohio 
Coppock, Samuel, Tippecanoe City, Ohio 
Coppock, Jacob, . Tippecanoe City, Ohio 

Cordier, F. P Cehna, Mercer, Ohio 

Cordier, Joseph, . . Calhoun, Richland, 111 
Correll, P. M., . Morelock, Greene, Tenn 

Correll, Caleb A 

.... II Charleston St., York, Pa 



Brethren! s Family Almanac. 



39 



sner, Daniel, 

. . Cavendish, Nez Perce, Idaiio 
sner, J. T., . . Bismark, Grant, W. Va 
tterman, Francis, .... Dayton, Ohio 
user, D. G., . Rokeby, Lancaster, Nebr 
ver, Samuel C, . . McClellandtown, Pa 
, Samuel M Kipple, Blair, Pa 



, Aaron, Dayton, Ohio 

ipe, John Hookdale, 111 

pe, David B., Ozawkie, Kans 

ipe, Jacob, Dego, Ind 

ipe, George W Cerro Gordo, 111 

pe, D. C. . . . North Manchester, Ind 

ipe, Israel, Warrensburg, Mo 

ipe, John W., . . Goshen, Elkhart, Ind 
[pe, Nathaniel, . Boylston, Clinton, Ind 
issman, G. W., . Walker, Russell, Kans 
issman, John, . . Horton's, Indiana, Pa 
ist, Isaac H., . Gardner, Johnson, Kans 
St, Samuel, . Menomonie, Dunn, Wis 
ist, Henry F., Gardner, Johnson, Kans 
ist, J.E., . . . Gardner, Johnson, Kans 
ist, D. A., . . . . Quinter, Gove, Kans 
Dss, Jasper J., (deaf mute) . . . . 

. . . Waterford, Ind 
*"%sswhite, A. G., . Gratis, Preble, Ohio 
2"S ouse, J. M., . Oak Hill, Fayette, W. Va 

P> ouse, Harrison, Mt. Carroll, 111 

"i'" outhamel, Hillery, Line Lexington, Pa 
owell, Devolt, . Bradford, Miami, Ohio 

uea, Moses Red Key, Ind 

ume, John Wawaka, Noble, Ind 

umrine, N. W., Wabash, Wabash, Ind 
umpacker, Samuel, . . . Bonsacks, Va 

Her, D. D., Greencastle, Ind. 

Ip, A. S., . . . Laconia, Harrison, Ind 

Ip, F Leeton, Johnson, Mo 

pp, P. F., Bills, Somerset, Pa 

igans, Milton, Auburn, Ritchie, W. Va 
^"'"liggett, Albion C. 



Va . . . 843 Fisk Ave., Villa Park, Colo 

Va mford, E. M., . . . Oran, Shelby, Ohio 

irr, John J., . . . Gideon, Somerset, Pa 

ivis, Chas Lawrenceburg, Tenn 

Lvis, D. C, . . . Trade, Johnson, Tenn 

ivis, C, Dunkirk, Jay, Ind 

ivis, Wm., .... Morrill, Brown, Kans 

ivis, J.N Tub, Somerset, Pa 

iwson. M. M.. Genson, Sebastian, Ark 

sary, James E., Carey, Ohio 

;anor, H. C Brownsville, Md 

iardorff, Henry, . Argos, Marshall, Ind 
jardorff, Isaac, . . Roann, Wabash, Ind 
iardorff, John D. W., . Gettysburg, Pa 
jbolt, Alpheus, Masontown, Fayette, Pa 

;eter, W. R., Milford, Ind 

leplain, John Waynesville, Mo 

ill, Isaac, .... Hamilton, Gage, Nebr 
ill, Jacob, . . Duquense, Allegheny, Pa 
Ip, Jacob, . Pearl City, Stephenson, 111 
;lp, Charles, . . . Carlisle, Lonoke, Ark 
jmmy, John C, . . . Astoria, Fulton, 111 
jnton, T. C, . Daleville, Botetourt, Va 
rrick. Marvel, .... Snowflake, Tenn 
jssenberg, Wm., .... Ashland, Ohio 
jtrick, J. B., . . . Earley, Mercer, Ohio 
itweiler, D. T., Salemville, Bedford, Pa 
ckey, L. H., . . . Alvada, Seneca, Ohio 
ckey, A. M., .... McPherson, Kans 
ckerson, Moses, .... Little River, Va 
ckson, H Franklin, W. Va 



Dierdorff, Daniel, . . Franklin Grove, 111 
Dierdorff, Daniel T., . . . Pierson, Iowa 
Dierdorff, M., .... Yale, Guthrie, Iowa 

Diehl, C. H., Jonesboro, Tenn 

Diehl, John, . Carnforth, Poweshiek, Iowa 

Diehl, J. B., Carroll, Iowa 

Diehl, J. W., . . . Panora, Guthrie, Iowa 

Dietz, T- F., Johnstown, Pa 

Digman, Thomas B., Mt. Lake Park, Md 

Digman, S.' P Mt. Lake Park, Md 

Dilling, David, . . Monticello, White, Ind 
Dilling, Levi S., .... Hagerstown, Ind 
Dilling, George, . Monticello, White, Ind 

Dillman, Morris, Peru, Ind 

Dively, Frederick C, Claysburg, Blair, Pa 
Dobbins, J. T., . . . Wolcott, White, Ind 

Dorer, Solomon, Johnstown, Pa 

Dove, F. W., Cabool, Texas, Mo 

Dove, Addison, Dovesville, Va 

Dove, J. A., Cloverdale, Va 

Downing, A. S Gridley, Kans 

Driver, Samuel, New Hope, Augusta, Va 

Driver, Jacob, Lima, Allen, Ohio 

Driver, Samuel, .... Lima, Allen, Ohio 
Driver, John F., . . . . Timberville, Va 
Drury, William, . Bristol, Fillmore, Minn 

Duncan, A. H McMinnville, Tenn 

Duncan, H Alum Ridge, Floyd, Va 

Duncan, A. B., Oak Hill, Fayette, W. Va 
Dunbar, Lute, . . Thorntown, Boon, Ind 
Dunbar, Peter, . . . Bower's Station, Ind 

Early, J. B., Salem, Marion, Ore 

Early, H. C, . . Meyerhoeffer's Store, Va 
Early, Isaac, . . . Sumption Prairie, Ind 
Early, John, . . Aurelia, Cherokee, Iowa 

Early, A. B., New Hope, Va 

Early, M. G., Nokesville, Prince Wm., Va 
Eavey, George W., Calhoun, Richland, 111 
Ebert, Otis, . . Greenland, Grant, W. Va 

Ebersole, J. F. Salem, Ore 

Eby, Josiah, Dayton, Ohio 

Eby, Isaac, . New Germantown, Perry, Pa 
Eby, J. G., Summerfield, Marshall, Kans 
Eby, Levi H.,. . . . . Summerfield, Kans 

Eby, Enoch, Booth, Reno, Kans 

Eby, David B., . . Lena, Steohenson, 111 
Eby, Henry H., . Eldorado, Preble, Ohio 

Eby, S. M Centre View, Mo 

Eby, Benjamin, Manheim, Lancaster, Pa 

Eby, D. F., . : Westfield, Ind 

Eby, Ira P., Laforge, Mo 

Eby, Josiah, New Germantown, Perry, Pa 
Eckard, David, . . . Walnut Bottom, Pa 
Ecker, Greenbury, .... Uniontown, Md 
Edgecomb, Samuel, . . . McCune, Kans 

Eicher, John K., Kecksburg, Pa 

Eikenberry, John, .... Plum Tree, Ind 
Eikenberry, J. E., . . Farnhamville, Iowa 
Eikenberry, Harvey, Greene, Butler, Iowa 
Eikenberry, J. F., . Greene, Butler, Iowa 
Eikenberry, J. W., . . . Altamont, Kans 
Eikenberry,. Wm. H., . . . Corinth, Iowa 
Eiler, Calvin F., . Shideler, Delaware, Ind 
Eisenhour, M. A., . Inwood, Marshall, Ind 
Eisenbise, John, . . Morrill, Brown, Kans 

Eisenbise, P. J Galesburg, Kans 

Eisenbise, William H., . . Mt. Carroll, 111 

Eisenberg, J. Y East Coventry, Pa 

Elgin, William, . . . Charity, Patrick, Va 
Ellenberger, George, Turney, Clinton, Mo 
Ellenberger, J. E., . . Polo, Caldwell, Mo 



Filer, J. W Salem, Roanoke, Va 

Eller, D. Newton, Daleville, Botetourt, Va 

Filer, G. R Gardner, Kans 

Ellis. 0. C River, Huntington, Ind 

Elliott, George, Ellinwood, Barton, Karis 
Elliott, J. M., . . Manvel, Brazoria, T| 

Elrod, Henry Mock's Mill' 

Elrod, Samuel, . . Gridley, Coffey, Kans 
Elson, I. H., .... Fairfield Center, Ind 

England, W. F., Ashland, Ohio 

Engler, Philip, Uniontown, Md 

Ennis, Marshall M., .... Elreno,Okla 
Erbaugli, G. Vv\, . . New Lebanon, Ohio 
Eslielman, J. H., Batavia, Jefferson, Iowa 
Eshelman, A. L., . . . Elizabethtown, Pa 
Etter, Henry, . . . Kidder, Caldwell, Mo 
Etter. Henry, . . Beautiful, Franklin, Pa 
Etter, David, Union Deposit, Dauphin, Pa 
Evans, Alex., .... Fayetteville, W. Va 

Everson, Thomas, Ladoga, Ind 

Eversole, Simon P Bremen, Ind 

Eversole, Silas N., . Devil's Lake, N. Dak 
Everts, John D., . Wilson's Mills, W. Va 

Fadely, II. L., Honey Creek, Ind 

Fahrney, Callo. Polo, III 

Fahrney, Peter D Frederick, Md 

Fair, C. G., .... Garrett, De Kalb, Ind 

Falkenstein, George N., 

. 63ii Germantown Ave., Phila., Pa 
Farneman, Frank, . . . Columbus, Kans 

Faust, Jeremiah Jones' Mills, Pa 

Faw, C.R Salem, N.C 

Faw, Enoch, Cameron, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Felthouse, J. V Elkhart, Ind 

Fergusen, Ashley, . . Erie, Whiteside, III 

Ferguson, I. B., Jones' Mills, Pa 

Fesler, Frederic, . . . Ovid, Madison, Ind 

Fike, Tobias S. Brookside, W. Va 

Fike, Moses, . . . Eglon, Preston, W. Va 

Fike, A Eglon, Preston, W. Va 

Fike, J. H Waterloo, Iowa 

Fike, Jonas, . . . Eglon, Preston, W. Va 

Fike, S. A Eglon, Preston, W. Va 

Fike, D. M., . . . Carleton, Thayer, Nebr 
Filbrum, David S., . Brandt, Miami, Ohio 

Filbrum,B.F Casstown, Ohio 

Filbrun, Joseph, . . Heizer, Barton, Kans 

Fillmore, A. G Gushing, Okla 

Fink, Samuel, . . . Geneva, Adams, Ind 
Finney, W. M., Cedar Creek, DeKalb.Ind 

Fisher, Jacob Mexico, Ind 

Fisher, Perry A., .. . . St. Albans, W. Va 

Fisher, Irvin, Mexico, Ind 

Fisher, Noah, Huntington, Ind 

Fisher, Frank, .... Mexico, Miami, Ind 

Fisher, Ira, Colfax, Clinton, Ind 

Fisher, Enos, . . . Kewanna, Fulton, Ind 

Fitz, John Astoria, Fulton, 111 

Fitz, John Yale, Guthrie, Iowa 

Fitz, Conrad, . . . Leeseburg, Fulton, 111 
Fitzwater, L. W., Bashan, Lincoln, Kans 

Fitzwater, S. W Dovesville, Va 

Flack, L. H Emporia, Lyon, Pa 

Fleming, James W. . Purgitsville, W. Va 
Fleshman, L. A., Lindside, Monroe, W. Va 
Flohr, J. R., . . Fountaindale, Adams, Pa 
Flora, Riley, . . . Hickman, Franklin, Va 

Flora, A. W Maxwell, Iowa 

Flora, M. A Helms, Franklin, Va 

Flory, Newton B., . Pleasant Dale, W. Va 
Flory, A. J Flora, Carroll, Ind 



40 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



Flory, Henry Defiance, Ohio 

Flory, J. S 

.... Station A., Los Angeles, Cal 
Flory, James, . . Shickley, Fillmore, Nebr 
Flory, George B., Lipscomb, Augusta, Va 
Elory, David, . . . Hastings, Barry, Mich 
nB|^, Samuel, . . . South EngHsh, Iowa 
;^OTy, Michael, . . Girard, Macoupin, 111 
Flory, George B., . . Helms, Franklin, Va 

Flory, D. C, New Hope, Va 

Flory, S. H., Nokesville, Va 

Fluck, J. B Loysburg, Bedford, Pa 

Fogelsanger, J. R., . . Middle Spring, Pa 

Fogle, Caleb Independence, Kans 

Folger, W. W., . . . Folger, Clarke, Iowa 
Follis, John, . . . Fredric, Monroe, Iowa 

Foltz, Samuel Hagerstown, Md 

Forney, Clayborn, . . . Parkersburg, 111 
Forney, Edmund, . Pine Creek, Ogle, 111 
Forney, Henry, . . . Chenoa, McLean, 111 

Forney, Peter Glendale, Ariz 

Forney, Benj., . Abilene, Dickinson, Kans 
Forney, Peter, . Aurora, Hamilton, Nebr 
Forney, S. M., . . Kearney, Buffalo, Nebr 
Forney, Daniel L., 

.... Palestine, St. Francis, Ark. 
Forney, Hiram, . Milford, Kosciusko, Ind 
Forney, Samuel, Mondovi, Lincoln, Wash 

Forrer, Samuel Herington, Kans 

Forrer, John, Stuart's Draft, Augusta, Va 

Foster, Joseph F., Luray, Va 

Fox, J.J.,. - - . Bunker Hill, Miami, Ind 
Frank, D. R., . . Somerset, Wabash, Ind 

Franklin, Wm. H Sam's Creek, Md 

Franklin, W. K., Lordsburg, Cal 

Frantz, J. L., . . De Graff, Logan, Ohio 

Frantz, Mathias Ladoga, Ind 

Frantz, J. R., . . Beattie, Marshall, Kans 
Frantz, Isaac, Pleasant Hill, Miami, Ohio 
Frantz, Henry, . . . Forgy, Clarke, Ohio 
Frantz, Charles, . . . Laurel Dale, W. Va 
Frantz, David. . . Cerro Gordo, Piatt, 111 

Frantz, Abram, Dawson, W. Va 

Frantz, Edward, .... McPherson, Kans 

Freed, Peter New Stark, Ohio 

Freeman, D. R Star City, Ind 

Frederick, J, E., . . . Salem, Marion, 111 
Frederic, C, . . . . Grundy Center, Iowa 

Fretz, William Hatfield, Pa 

Friedly, John, .... Goose Neck, W. Va 
Fryfogle, Benjamin, . . . Sunfield, Mich 

Fryfogle, Addison, Seward, Kans 

Fryfogle, Benjamin F., . . Sunfield, Mich. 

Fulk, George H Fulk's Run, Va 

Funderburg, Jacob, .... Laketon, Ind 
Funk, John, .... Maxwell, Story, Iowa 

Funk, Peter Gallion, Iowa 

Fyock, Abram, . Johnstown, Cambria, Pa 
Fyock, J. W., Purchase Line, Indiana, Pa 

Gable, Eli Plymouth, Ind 

Gable, John, .... Ollie, Keokuk, Iowa 
Garber, Joel, . . . Marmaros, Stone, Mo 
Garber, Mathias, . Romeo, Greene, Tenn 

Garber, Simon Fremont, Ohio 

Garber, Levi, . Mt. Sidney, Augusta, Va 
Garber, A. D., . Mt. Sidney, Augusta, Va 
Garber, J. R., . . Rockwell City, Kans 
Garber, Henry P., . . Portland, Jay, Ind 

Garber, B. F Timberville, Va 

Garber, Jacob Trotwood, Ohio 

Garber, Jacob Greenmount, V^ 



Garber, Peter Weyer's Cave, Va 

Garber, S.W Allison, 111 

Garber, Jacob C Barren Ridge, Va 

Garber, S. H., Leesburgh, Tenn 

Garland, John C, . . Pleasant Ridge, Pa 

Garman, John H Keuka, Fla 

Garner, Charles, . . Grundy Centre, Iowa 
Games, J. D., . . . Upper Strasburg, Pa 
Garst, Henry, .... Blountville, Tenn 
Garst, Isaac B., .... Appanoose, Kans 

Garst, J. H., Blountville, Tenn 

Garst, George, Madison, Kans 

Garst, Jeremiah, . . Salem, Roanoke, Va 
Garst, Henry M., . . Salem, Roanoke, Va 
Garst, Noah N., . . . . Blountville, Tenn 

Garst, J. O., Dayton, Ohio 

Garver, Daniel M., . . Farmersville, Ohio 
Garver, J. B., . . Allen, Cumberland, Pa 
Garver, Samuel, . Chatham Centre, Ohio 
Garver, John E., . Cora, Huntingdon, Pa 
Gauby, Martin D., . . Washington, Kans 
Gault, Samuel, .... Avilla, Jasper, Mo 

Gaunt, W. A. Elk Lick, Pa 

George, Ard., . . . Carthage, Jasper, Mo 
George, D. W., . . Martin. Grant, W. Va 
George, Wm., . Antioch, Mineral, W. Va 
Gephart.J. W., . Arkadelphia, Clark, Ark 
Gerdes, David, . Morrison, Whiteside, 111 

Gerhart, Jacob Allison, 111 

Gibble, Isaac, . . . Hemet, Riverside, Cal 
Gibble, Cyrus R., . . . Brunnersville, Pa 

Gibble, Hiram, White Oak, Pa 

Gibson, Javan, . . . Girard, Macoupin, 111 
Gibson, G. W., . . Maxwell, Story, Iowa 
Gibson, Charles, . . Girard, Macoupin, 111 
Gibson, Cullen C, . Girard, Macoupin, 111 

Gibson, D. B Cerro Gordo, 111 

Gibson, I. M Girard, 111 

Giffin, E. J., . Mont Ida, Anderson, Kans 
Gilbert, Frank, Pearl City, Stephenson, 111 
Gilbert, James Z., . . . . Belleville, Kans 
Gilbert, Silas, . . Lightsville, Darke, Ohio 
Gilbert, Greenberg, . New Canton, Tenn 

Gilchrist, Joseph, Fairfield, Iowa 

Ginrich, A. B., . . Fontana, Lebanon, Pa 

Gillett, C. E Glendale, Ariz 

Gillett, W.'F., Glendale, Ariz 

Gish, G. W., .... Secor, Woodford, 111 

Gish, James R Stuttgart, Ark 

Gish, Rufus Laporte, Texas 

Gish, J. W., . . Holmesville, Gage, Nebr 
Glen, John, . Wardensville, Hardy, W. Va 
Glick, Joseph, . . Mingona, Barber, Kans 

Glick, Joel, Lake Arthur, La 

Glotfelty, James, . . . Libertyville, Iowa 
Glotfelty, Wra. N., . . Libertyville, Iowa 
Gnagey, Joel, . Meyersdale, Somerset, Pa 

Good, M. J Mt. Jackson, Va 

Goodman, John W Woburn, 111 

Gorham, A. L Clarkson, Okla 

Goshorn, Benj. F Clay City, Ind 

Goshorn, R. R., Woodside, Ind 

Goshorn, G. V., .... Carson City, Nev 

Gotwalls, Jacob Z Oaks, Pa 

Gochenour, E., . . Big Mount, York, Pa 
Goughenour, Samuel M., Longmont, Colo 
Goughenour, James L., . . Elkhart, Iowa 
Grady, Isaac S., Syracuse, Kosciusko, Ind 
Grady, Geo. W., . Mt. Freedom, W. Va 
Graham, J. H., Downington, Meigs, Ohio 
Graham, Thomas, . , Holmesville, Nebr 



Grater, A. L., . . Malvern, Whiteside, 

Grater, W, H Malvern, 

Graybill, Israel, . . . Penn, Lancaster, 

Graybill, Reuben Manheim, 

Graybill, George, .... Brugh's Mill, " 

Graybill, Jonas Brugh's Mill, 

Graybill, Jas. H., Roanoke, Roanoke, ' 
Grabill, John, . Groffdale, Lancaster, 

Gray, S. S., Warrior's Mark, 

Gray, E. D Limestone, Te 

Green, John C, Lonaconing, 1 

Greenwood, J. W., . . . Grab, Texas, 1 
Gresso, Jacob, . . . McDonald's Mill, 

Gripe, N. S., Clarkson, 01 

Griffeth, J. M., . Brummett's Creek. N 

Griffith, Elias Anderson, Kc 

Groff, Joseph, Covington, 01 

Groff, Nathan North Star, O] 

Groff, Hershey, Bareville, 

Grossnickle, S. P., .... Edenton, O] 

Groves, CM Overhill, W. 

Guinn, Isaiah, Heath, I 

Gump, Jacob Cedar, De Kalb, 1 

Gump, Jeremiah Ari, Noble, 1 

Gump, Henry, . . Tippecanoe City, 01 
Gustin, D. VV., . Middletown, Henry,] 
Guthrie, Joseph, .... Hazelton, W. 

Gwinn, Jacob, Moscow, Idj 

Hackman, Jacob, Oregon, Lancaster, 

Hagerman, Geo., Toddville, Ic 

Haines, A. H New Haven, Cc 

Hall, Larkin, . . . Montour, Tama, Ic 

Hall, F Montour, Tama, Ic 

Hall, Wm. I., Marysville, 

Hale, Darlin, . . Bourbon, Marshall, '. 
Hahn, M. L., . . Lakeside, Pulaski, '. 
Hahn, M. W., . . North Georgetown, O 
Haldeman, Samuel, Morrill, Brown, K 

Hamm, Solomon D Astoria, 

Hamilton, Hiel, . . . Flora, Carroll, \ 

Hamilton, Jacob Altamont, K 

Hammon, Peter, Atwood, '. 

Hanawalt, George, Boucher, 

Hanawalt, Joseph M., . . Dumont, I( 

Hand, J. H Lakeside, Pulaski, 

Harader, Lee, .... Pioneer, Barry, 

Harader, 1. L Racine, Newton, 

Harader, C Arkansas City, K 

Harden, Thomas, Hyndman, 

Hardman, D. C, Hamilton, 

Harlacher. J. A East Berlin, 

Harley, John, Pottstown. 

Harley, Samuel, Ephrata, Lancaster 
Harman, Ananias, . Abraham, Floyd, 
Harman, Wm., . Tontogany, Wood, C 
Harman, B.J. , . . . Bladensburg, I 

Harnish, Jacob, Dorrance, K 

Harp, Geo. S., . . Ellerton, Frederick, 
Harp, James, . . Hedges, Paulding, C 
Hardy, James, . Aurelia, Cherokee, I 
Harris, James P., . . Cabool, Texas, 

Harris, Isham Ergo, Newton, 

Harrold, Albert, . . . Columbiana, C 

Harshbarger, Isaac Girare 

Harshbarger, Joshua P., . . Painter, K 
Harshbarger, John, . . . Jeffersonville 

Harshbarger, J. W Girard 

Harshbarger, John Johnstown 

Harshbarger, Wm. R Ladoga, 

Harshman, Samson, . Centropolis, E 
Harrison, John C, . .(, . Coneraaugh 



Brethretis Family Almanac. 



41 



Hartman, Daniel B., 
Hartsough, Joseph, 
Hartsough, John, . . 
Harvey, William, . 



. Sputh Bend, Ind 
. . Nappanee, Ind 

. Knox, Stark, Ind 
Jasper, Jasper, Mo 



Harvey, Amos, .... Jasper, Jasper, Mo 

Hatchor, Wm. L., Ridgeway, Ind 

Haughtelin, J. D Panora. Iowa 

Hawbaker, A. W., . Waukee, Dallas, Iowa 

Hawke. Martin Edgeworth, Tenn 

Hays, Daniel, Broadway, Va 

'^'|Hays, J.S Cherry Box, Shelby, Mo 

Hazlettj fames L., Rossville, Clinton, Ind 

Heckler, Jesse Y Alvo, Cass, Nebr 

Heckman, C. T Garlington, Kans 

Heckman, John, Polo, Ogle, 111 

Heestand, A. I.. Smithville, Ohio 

Heeter, N, B., . Warsaw, Kosciusko, Ind 
Heeter, G. B., . . North Manchester, Ind 
Hege, George, . Williamson, Franklin, Pa 

Heiny, D. B Shickley, Nebr 

Heller, Jacob, . . . Decatur, Adams, Ind 
Henricks, Zaccheus, . . Conductor, Kans 
Hendrickson, D. C, . West Milton, Ohio 

Hershberger, Solomon . 

Valley Mill, Bedford, Pa 

Hetrick, J. P East Coventry, Pa 

Hetrick, David A., Oakland, Pa 

Heyser, Emmanuel, . . . Oak Lawn, Fla 

Heiple, Theo., Boucher, Pa 

J"! Heisy, Martin, . . Cornwall, Lebanon, Pa 
Heistand, Jacob, Hoaglin, Ohio 

'^'!" Heitz, S Cerro Gordo, 111 

Heifer, P., Plymouth, Ohio 

Helman, James Q., Cosmos, Ohio 

Henry, Samuel, . . . Lacon, Marshall, 111 
Herman, Michael, . . Adair, Adair, Iowa 
Herr, John, . . Myerstown, Lebanon, Pa 
Herr, Tobias, Millersville, Lancaster, Pa 

Hershberger, I. A. B Liberty, Va 

Hershberger, J. S Everett, Pa 

Hershey, Emmanuel, . Gettysburg, Ohio 

Hershey, Daniel Fruitdale, Ala 

Hess, Aaron, Goshen, Ind 

Hess, Wm Goshen, Ind 

Hertzler, Ephraim, 

Pleasant Grove, Douglass, Kan 
Hertzler, Wm., .... Elizabethtown, Pa 

Hertzler, John, Bethel, Pa 

Hertzler, Jonas, . . . Pawnee Rock, Kans 

toi|Hertzog, P. H Meadow Brook, Kans 

Hiatt, Elihu Rigdon, Grant, Ind 

Hicks, Oliver Z., . Idlewood, Jefferson, 111 
Hieshman, Geo., . . Wardensville, W. Va 

Highbarger, O. S Burkittsville, Md 

Hildebrand, David, . . . Conemaugh, Pa 



irg,l(Hildebrand, Christ, . . . South Bend, Ind 



Hildebrand, Jacob, . . . Walkerton, Ind 
Hilkey, James E.,Overbrook, Osage, Kans 

ing.O Hilary, O. S Burkittsville, Md 

!ee, I|Hillery, Lemuel, Teegarden, Marshall, Ind 

Hillery, C Worthington, Minn 

Hill, James, . . . . Cicero, Hamilton, Ind 
Himes, W. B., . Dorrance, Russell, Kans 
Hinegardner, B, D., . Lost River, W. Va 
Hinkle, James, . . . Johnson City, Tenn 

Hipes, Wm. C Greene, Butler, Iowa 

Hockman, John, . . Pleasant Dale, W. Va 

Hochstettler.H.P., Rummel, Pa 

Hochstettler, Josiah, . . . Mt. Hope, Ohio 
olisK Hochstettler, David, . . Engle's Mills, Md 
^i4 Hostetler, E. K Pocohontas, Pa 



Hodge, Josiah, Piney Flats, Sullivan, Tenn 
Hodgden, Merrill, . . . Galesburg, Kans 

Hodgden, Sidney Galesburg, Kans 

Hodgden, Dorsey, . . . Huntington, Ind 
Hoff, E. B., 1606 E. Lyon St.. . . . 

Des Moines, Iowa 

Hoffman, Aaron, . . Argos, Marshall, Ind 
Hohf, Henry, . . . Black Rock, York, Pa 
Hohf, D. B., . Smith's Station, York, Pa 
Hoke, Jonas, Leetonia, Columbiana, Ohio 
Hoke, Henry, . Rehoboth, Harrison, Ind 

Hoke, Levi, Goshen, Ind 

Holder, Joseph, . Anderson, Madison, Ind 
Holder, Daniel, . Batavia, Jefferson, Iowa 

Holder, Levi, Summitville, Ind 

Holderman, Michael, . . . Pine Grove, Pa 
Holderman, Christian, . . . Carthage, Mo 
Holler, John, Alamosa, Rio Grande, Colo 

Holler, George Dayton, Ohio 

Holler, George Huntington, Ind 

Holhnger, Joseph, . . Astoria, Fulton, 111 
Hollinger, John, . Russell, Russell, Kans 
Hollinger, Daniel, . . Astoria, Fulton, 111 
Hollinger, Abram K„ . . Harrisburg, Pa 
Hollinger, Daniel, Hope, Dickinson, Kans 
Hollinger, Jacob, . . . Green Spring, Pa 
Hollinger, Albert, .... Huntsdale, Pa 
Hollinger, David, . . . Pittsburg, Ohio 
Hollinger, Moses, . . New Madison, Ohio 
Hollinger, Jacob, . Wawaka, Noble, Ind 

Hollinger, Henry, Fontana, Pa 

HoUoway, James, .... Centre View, Mo 

Holmes, Eli, Shanesville, Ohio 

Holsberry, James, . . . Corinth, W. Va 
Holsinger, Wm., .... Rosedale, Kans 

Holsinger, Levi, Ladoga, Ind 

Holsinger, C. S., Belleville, Kans 

Holsinger, John S., . . . . Nokesville, Va 
Holsinger, J. L., . . Baker's Summit, Pa 
Holsinger, Levi, . Waterside, Bedford, Pa 

Holsinger, Merton, Ladoga, Ind 

Holsopple, Daniel, Rummel, Pa 

Holsopple, Jacob, Geistown, Pa 

Holsopple, Joseph, . Indiana, Indiana, Pa 
Holsopple, W. W., . . . St. Martin's, Mo 
Holsopple, F. F., . • • Sergeantsville, N. J 

Honberger, S. A., Roanoke, La 

Honeyman, B, F., . . West Milton, Ohio 
Hoover, Isaac L., . Alfred, Douglas, Kans 
Hoover, Jon^athan, . . Oran, Shelby, Ohio 
Hoover, John J., . . . . Rocky Ford, Colo 
Hoover, Cyrus, Weilersville, Wayne, Ohio 
Hoover, David F., . Sulphur Springs, Ind 
Hoover, Joseph, Middlebury, Elkhart, Ind 

Hoover, J. L Sulphur Springs, Ind 

Hoover, Tobias, . Chatham Centre, Ohio 
Hoover, Joseph J., Barryville, Stark, Ohio 
Hoover, Jacob, . Hagerstown, Wayne, Ind 

Hoover, Silas Bills, Pa 

Hoover, O. P., Dayton, Ohio 

Hoover, W. I. T Dayton, Ohio 

Hooper, C. J., . . Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 

Hope, C Herington, Kans 

Hopkins, Ernest, Dayton, Wash 

Hoppock, J. D Sergeantsville, N. J 

Hopwood, G. W., .... Deep River, Iowa 
Horn, Elijah, Roseville, Muskingum, Ohio 

Horner, D. D., Jones' Mills, Pa 

Horning, W. E Frederick, S. Dak 

Horning, Samuel, . . New Lebanon, Ohio 
Horning, Jonas, . ... Johnsville, Ohio 



Hosfeld, C. F Shippensburg, Pa 

Hottenstein, Amos, . East Petersburg, Pa 
Houk, Peter, . . Ridgeway, Howard, Ind 
Howe, Wm., .... Maitland, Mifflin, Pa 
Hoxie, G. W., . Williams, Josephine^)re 
Hufford, D. A., . . Rossville, Clin^pnd 
Hufford, Isaac, Clarion, Charlev^J^ich 
Huffman, Lewis, . . Mt. Zion, Wells, Ind 

Huffman, Peter, Elkhart, Ind 

Huffman, J. B. F., . . . . Rileysville, Va 
Hugendougler, J., .... Deepwater, Mo 

Hull, Abraham Hall, York, Pa 

Hull, R. T., . . Bakersville, Somerset, Pa 
Humbarger, John, 

Verdon, Richardson, Nebr 

Humbarger, Loren, . Columbia City, Ind 
Hummer, Fred, . . . Blaine, Jay, Indiana 

Hummer, S. S Colchester, 111 

Hutchison, A McPherson, Kans * 

Hutchison, Jas. A., .... Cordova, Md 
Hutchinson, Jas., . . . Lindside, W. Va 
Hutchinson, Geo. . . . Lindside, W. Va 
Hutchinson, S. W., . . Lindside, W. Va 

Huttle, Benj Passer, Bucks, Pa 

Hyde, Robinson, .... Sand Brook, N. J 

Hyer, Enoch Whitfield, Ohio 

Hyer, Leonard, . . . Merriam, Noble, Ind 

Hylton, H. P., Hylton, Floyd, Va 

Hylton, CD Hylton, Floyd, Va 

Hylton, J. B., Vaughn, Floyd, Va 

Hylton, B. B., Idumea, Mo 

Hylton, Jacob, .... Hylton, Floyd, Va 

Hylton, Joseph Pax, Floyd, Va 

Hylton, Austin, Pax, Floyd, Va 

Hylton, Joseph B. Idumea, Mo 

Hylton, John W. B., . . . . Macomb, Mo 
Hylton, A. N., . . . . Hylton, Floyd, Va 

Ihrig, J. B., Avery, Mo 

Ikenberry, Samuel M., .... Helms, Va 
Ikenberry, Henry, . . Wirtz, Franklin, Va 
Itenberry, John, . . Nora, Nuckolls, Nebr 
Ikenberry, W. Lewis, . . . Mt. Morris, 111 
Ikenberry, L. D., 

. . . 1228 Conn St., Lawrence, Kans 
Ikenberry, J. W., . .Wirtz, Franklin, Va 
Imler, T. F., 

. 419 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa 
Irvin, David M., . . Orrville, Wayne, Oh'io 
Isenburg, W. D., . . . Gillenwater, Tenn 

Iset, John Grater's Ford, Pa 

Iset, John Jewell City, Kans 

Ives, Allen, . . . Burr Oak, Jewell, Kans 
Jamison, Geo. M., Arritt's, Alleghany, Va 
Jamison, John, .... Pott's Creek, Va 
Jamieson, B. F., . Copen, Braxton, W. Va 
Jarboe, J. W., . . Republican City, Nebr 
Jellison, J. H., . . . Allison, Lawrence, 111 
John, Eleazer, . . . Leeton, Johnson, Mo 
John, J. J., . . . Daleville, Botetourt, Va 
Johnson, Wm 

• . 1533 Orange St., Wichita, Kans 
Johnson, Stephen, Garrison, Benton, Iowa 
Johnson, Isaiah C, . . . Bridgewr.ter, Va 
Johnson, J. C, ^1 S. Mt. Vernon St., 

Uniontown, Pa 

Jones, Henry, . West Milton, Miami, Ohio 

Jones, S. P., Brooklyn, S. C 

Jones, Joseph Farmersville, 111 

Jones, D. H., Dunlap, Ind 

Jordan, J. L. ... Collins, St. Clair, Mo 
Joseph, John E., . North Manchester, Ind 



42 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



Julius, Aaron, . . Dos Palos, Merced, Cal 
Kagey, Jos. M., Dayton, Rockingham, Va 
Kahler, Jno. F., . Louisville, Stark, Ohio 
Ka^herman, J., Gettysburgh, Darke, Ohio 

[man, S. B Lawrence, Kans 

m, J. S., Berlinton, Marshall, Ind 
KauHrnan, Solomon, . . Oakland Mills, Pa 

Keim, Howard, Ladoga, Ind 

Keim, David, . . St. Peter's, Chester, Pa 

Keiser, J. W., Primrose, Ohio 

Keiser, Thos., . . Roanoke, Woodford, 111 
Keith, Jacob F., . . . . Camp Creek, Va 

Keith, Z., Pax, Va 

Keller, Henry, . . . North Liberty, Ohio 
Keller, Henry, . Osceola, Crawford, Ohio 

Keller, J. H Livingston, Iowa 

Keller, Daniel Huntsdale, Pa 

> Keller, G Bunker Hill, Miami, Ind 

Keller, I. B Lincoln, Lancaster, Pa 

Keller, J. E., . . . . Tipton, Cedar, Iowa 
Keller, Michael, . . Heizer, Barton, Kans 
Kellcy, H. N., . . . . Burlington, W. Va 

Kelso, Jonathan, Carleton, Nebr 

Key, Isaac, .... Winamac, Pulaski, Ind 

Kendig, E. D., Fisherville, Va 

Kendig, J. R Stuart's Draft, Va 

Kennedy, James, . . Camden, Carroll, Ind 
Kesler, Benj. E., . Ramsey, Franklin, Va 
Kessler, Joseph, . . Pleasant Home, Ohio 
Keltner, P. R., 702 E. 9th St., Sterling, 111 

Keltner, Lewis E Pearl City, 111 

Killingsworth, Abel, Collins, Mo 

Kimmel, Lewis, Elderton, Armstrong, Pa 

Kimmel, David, McLouth, Kans 

Kimmel, J. T., . . Mishler, Portage, Ohio 

Kindig, J. J Juniata, Adams, Nebr 

King, Joshua Y., . . Griffin, Caroline, Md 

Kinsey, Jesse Clayton, Ohio 

Kinsey, Lewis, . Hagerstown, Wayne, Ind 
Kinsley, Chas., . . Hartville, Stark, Ohio 
Kintner, Jacob, . . Moats, Defiance, Ohio 

Kirakofe, B. A Stover, Va 

Kirk, D. W., . . . Colfax, Marion, W. Va 
Kirklin, J. R., . . . New Burlington, Ind 

Kitterman, G Montpelier, Ind 

Kittinger, B. F Ambler, Pa 

Klepper, Peter, .... Alum Well, Tenn 

Klepper, D. B Cloyd's Creek, Tenn 

Klepinger, William Dayton, Ohio 

Kline, M. B. E Broadway, Va 

Kline, H. S., 2000 Center Avenue, . 

Reading, Pa 

Kline, Daniel R., . . . Bethel, Berks, Pa 
Knavel, Peter, . Scalp Level, Cambria, Pa 

Knisley, Christian, Everett, Pa 

Knisley, Geo., . . Tatesville, Bedford, Pa 

Kob, L. M., Garden Grove, Iowa 

Kolb, T. J., . . . Double Pipe Creek, Md 
Kollar, G. V., . . New Philadelphia, Ohio 
Kollar, Peter, . . New Philadelphia, Ohio 
Koontz, Jacob, . . Loysburg, Bedford, Pa 
Koontz, Wm., Shady Grove, Franklin, Pa 
Kopenhaver, Wm., . . . Mt. Carmel, Pa 
Krabill, John P., . . Prairie Depot, Ohio 
Krabill, C, . . . Farmer, Defiance, Ohio 
Kreider, David, . . . South Whitley, Ind 
Kreider, Tobias, . . . Painter Creek, Ohio 
Kreighbaum, H. W., . . South Bend, Ind 
Kreigh, Wm. H., . Chippewa Lake, Mich 
Krewson, Wm. A., . . . Cincinnati, Iowa 
Kulp, Isaac Grater's Ford, Pa 



Kulp, J. S., Dunlap, Elkhart, Ind 

Kurtz, J. H., . Portland, Mahoning, Ohio 
Kurtz, John., . . . Hartville, Stark, Ohio 
Kutz, Daniel, Deturksville, Schuylkill, Pa 
Lahman, Joseph C, . . . . Mt. Morris, 111 

Lair, John M Custer, Mich 

Lake, Daniel B., . . . . Harrisonville, Pa 

Lambert, Amby, Dayton, Va 

Lambert, G. W., . . Mt. Freedom, W. Va 
Landis, Daniel, . . . Shepherdstown, Pa 
Landis, Elias, . . . Richfield, Juniata, Pa 
Landis, Henry, . Bringhurst, Carroll, Ind 

Landis, Bartley Hollowtown, Ohio 

Landis, G. W., . . . Crescent City, Okla 

Lane, James C, Big Tunnel, Va 

Lane, James R., . . . . Shirleysburg, Pa 
Lauter, George M., . . . Union City, Ind 
Lapp, Christian, Cherry Box, Shelby, Mo 

Lapp, Oliver J., Moorefield, Nebr 

Larick, Henry, .... Monte Vista, Colo 
Larimere, John, . . . White Store, Tenn 
Larkins, S. O., (Rowland Park), . 

Baltimore City, Md 

Laughrun, A. M., Relief, Mitchell, N. C 
Laughrun, Marion, Relief, Mitchell, N. C 

Leaman, W. H., Madison, Kans 

Leatherman, J. M., . Purgitsyille, W. Va 
Leatherman, George, . . . Harmony, Md 
Leatherman, Geo. W., . . Keyser, W. Va 
Leatherman, J. R., . . . Hayesville, Kans 
Leatherman, I. W., Conway Springs, Kans 
Leatherman, David, . New Carlisle, Ohio 
Leatherman, J. N., . . Purgitsville, W. Va 
Leckrone, Quincy, .... Ziontown, Ohio 
Leckrone, Samuel, North Manchester, Ind 
Leckrone, Emanuel, . . . Silver Lake, Ind 

Leedy, Daniel, Albany, Ore 

Leedy, Amos, Williamsburg, 111 

Leedy, Joseph Huntington, Ind 

Leedy, Abram, Andrews, Ind 

Leedy, John H Tom's Brook, Va 

Leer, Benjamin, .... Shipshewana, Ind 

Lefever, Elias B., Ephrata, Pa 

Leftwich, J. P., . . Gillaspie, Bedford, Va 
Lehman, J. B., Crowson, Lawrence, Tenn 
Lehman, Josiah, St. Martin's, Morgan, Mo 
Lehman, Franklin B., . . . Aurelia, Iowa 
Lehman, Samuel, Jr., Franklin Grove, 111 
Lehman, Hiram, Geistown, Cambria, Pa 
Lehmer, S. G., . . East Los Angeles, Cal 

Lehner, John Upton, Franklin, Pa 

Lemon, J. D., . . . Juniata, Adams, Nebr 

Lentz, G. W., Adrian, Bates, Mo 

Lerew, Lewis, . . . Portis. Osborne, Kans 
Lerew, Isaac S., . . Portis, Osborne, Kans 

Lesh, John, Flora, Carroll, Ind 

Lesley, Eli, .... Nevada, Vernon, Mo. 
Lewis, J. G., . . Medina, Washington, Va 
Lewis, Albert, . Fairmont, Fillmore, Nebr 

Lierly, Wm. R Clayton, Adams, 111 

Lichtenwalter, A. B Neutral, Kans 

Lichty, W. H Waterloo, Iowa 

Light, H. E., . Mountville, Lancaster, Pa 
Light, Joseph B., . . Green Springs, Ohio 
Light, Caleb, .... Decatur, Burt, Nebr 

Lilligh, Henry Woburn, Bond, 111 

Lilly. J. H... . . .Columbia City, Ind 

Lilly, Thomas, .... Johnson City, Tenn 

Lilly, Andrew J., Lawson, Tenn 

Lingenfelter, Mathias Canton, III 

Lint, C. G., . . Meyersdale, Somerset, Pa 



Long, Walter S., . . . . Shirleysburg, 

Long, Victor Fairplay, I 

Long, David, Fairplay, I 

Long, Joseph, 20 Belvidere St., York, : 
Long, Peter, '. . Brighton, Lagrange, I 

Long, Emanuel, Bridgewater, ' 

Long, Daniel H Peru, Miami, I 

Long, Orrville V Abbottstown, ; 

Long, W. H., . . Garrison, Benton, lo^ 
Longanecker, Daniel, .... Paola, Ka 
Longanecker, J., West Manchester, Oh 
Longanecker, H. C, 

... 39 S. Noble St., Anderson, L 

Longanecker, J, H Palmyra, J 

Longanecker, Noah, . . . Hartville, Oh 
Loomis, Ed., . . New Philadelphia, Oh 
Loose, S. M., . Freemont, Sandusky, Oh 

Lorah, Daniel, Laforge, 1\ 

Love, Leonard F Martland, Ne 

Lowry, Geo. W,, Scullton, Somerset, ] 
Lucas, C, . Prairie City, McDonough, 

Lugenbeel, Wm., Hubbell, Ne 

Lutz, A. H., . . Winslow, Stephenson, 
Lutz, Ezra, . . . Winslow. Stephenson, 
Lutz, G. H., Leavenworth, Kans . . 

.... Care of Mo. & Kan. Tel. ( 
Lyon, Thomas D., Hudson, McLean, : 
Lyon, Wm. M., 315 Ninth Street, . . 

S.E., Washington, D. 

Lytle, David, . Townwood, Putnam, Oh 

Macy, Lewis, Millville, Ray, A 

Maddock, T. B., . Clover Creek, Blair, ] 

Maderia, Charles Milton Grove, 1 

Magie, John E., Tropico, C 

Mahle, Edward, . . Fryburg, Clarion, 1 
Mahler, Geo., . . Pioneer, Williams, Oh 
Mahoney, Jacob, .... Fall River, Kai 

Mallow, W. D Austin, Ross, Oh 

Mansfield, Morgan, . . Frederick, S. Dj 
Manon, George, . . . Gypsum City, Kai 

Mark, John Edon, Williams, Oh 

Markey, E. A., Centre View, IV 

Markley, David, . Mt. Etna, Adams, lov 

Marshall, C, Maples, Ir 

Martin, Henry, Lanark, 1 

Martin, Silas, .... Corning. Adams, I 
Martin, C. F., . . Naperville, Dupage, ] 

Martin, N., Hagerstown, IV 

Martin, J. F., . . . Bradford, Miami, Oh 

Mason, J. T., Cabool, Texas, N 

Masterson, B. F., . . . . ^ Lordsburg, C 

Mathias, Jefferson Clarion, Io\ 

Mathias, S., . . Lost River, Hardy, W. ^ 
Maust, S. P., . Meyersdale, Somerset, I 
Maust, H. F., . . Struble, Plymouth, \o\ 

Mays, I. C Cedarville, Dade, » 

May, James, (col.),. . . Circleville, Oh 
May, Charles E., (col.), . Circleville, Oh 

McCann, S. N., Bridgewater. ^ 

McCann, Wm. J., . . Indian Camp. W. ' 
McCarty, John S., . . . Clarkesville, I 

McClure, M. J., Cerro Gordo, 

McCune, R. F Dallas Centre, lo 

McDannell. D. S., Mt. Morris, 

McDonald, A. C Hardin, Ray, 1 

McKeehan, E. K., . . . Jonesboro, Te 
McKimmey, Perry, . . . Metamora, O 
McKimmey, Wm., . . . Metamora, O 

McLean, John Bijou Hills, S. I 

McLellan, Litchfield, . . . Sherman, N 
McMahon, John, . Alton, Upshur, W. 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



43 



Pi ^cMullen, J., Mansfield, Ohio 

\\{ ^cNutt, C. S., . . . Panther, Dallas, Iowa 
Mil ileck, Levi L., • • • Octavia, Butler, Nebr 

klellott, Absalom, .... Gem, Fulton, Pa 
, ijj »Ierkey, Jacob, .... Washington, Kans 
r,Vi /lerrill, David M., .... Lonaconing, Md 

,ln( kessner, Peter B Campbell, Mich 

p, »Ietz, O., South Whitley, Ind 

loK /letzgar, Robert, . . Denver, Miami, Ind 

Kani 'letzgar, John, Lordsburg, Cal 

Ohi) |/Ietzgar, John W Lordsburg, Cal 

4etzler, J., Wakarusa, Ind 

y leyers, J. T., . .Oaks, Montgomery, Pa 

Pi j/Ieyers, David, . . . New Cambria, Kans 

01ii( keyers, J. D., . . Ramona, Marion, Kans 

Ohit filler, Isaac A Stover, Angusta, Va 

01ii( liller, Daniel Monticello, Ohio 

>_II, liller, W. T., . Woodstock, Howard, Md 
i\el) liller, Daniel, Mercersburg, Franklin, Pa 
t^ P liller, Andrews, . . . Port Republic, Va 

1, II liller, S. P., New Sharon, Iowa 

fjel), liller, Howard, . . Lewisburg, Union, Pa 

,„ II liller, B. W Advance, Indiana, Pa 

)„'ll liller, M. C, . . . North Manchester, Ind 

liller, Isaac, . . . North Manchester, Ind 
;1 Q liller, E. A Lordsburg, Cal 

liller, B. B., Greenmount, Va 

liller, P. S Roanoke, Va 

D ( liller, John A., Bridgewater, Va 

liller, S. M., Waterloo, Iowa 

I liller, S. H., Waterloo, Iowa 

f liller, Abednego, De Graff, Logan, Ohio 

p liller, N. J., Waterloo, Iowa 

Q liller, J. A., Manvel, Texas 

u p liller, S. G., . Bolivar, Westmoreland, Pa 
Ql,i liller, George H., . . . Point, Bedford, Pa 
^jj liller, Alexander, .... Nappanee, Ind 
Qljj liller, B. F., . . . . Dallas Centre, Iowa 

liller, Daniel, .... Weyer's Cave, Va 
j^jj liller, Isaac H., - Abbyville, Reno, Kans 

Qjij liller, Joseph M., Ottobine, Va 

U liller, Joseph A Sangerville, Va 

\ liller, Anthony A., . . . Sangerville, Va 
;^ jj liller, David J., Overhill, Upshur, W. Va 
\ ] liller, Benjamin, .... Greenmount, Va 

liller, Isaac, . . Woodland, Barry, Mich 

liller, D.P South Bend, Ind 

liller, Henderson, . . Comet, Ashe, N. C 
.,j liller, John B., . New Paris, Bedford, Pa 
■.liller, J. H., Goshen, Ind 



' ' r, liller, Mathias, 
■J, u ™ 



Comet, Ashe, N. C 
liller, Samuel, . . West Alexandria, Ohio 

liller, A. F Booth, Reno, Kans 

Milledgeville, 111 

liller, W. H., Jerico, Cedar, Mo 

. . . Le Mars, Iowa 

, liller, S. S La Place, Piatt, 111 

^J liller, J. H Glendora. Cal 

. liller, James, South Bend, Ind 

^\ [iller, William, South Bend, Ind 

^' [iller, Thurston, La Porte, Ind 

'^' lliller, D. M., Milledgeville, 111 



liller, Samuel T., Stonewall, Augusta, Va 



liller, E. J., . Box 298, Argentine, Kans 

"'^' liller, Martin, .... Jalapa, Grant, Ind 

liller, J. R., . . . Nappanee, Elkhart, Ind 



liller, Lewi.: Jennings, La 



liller, Alfred, 



. Carroll, Clinton, Pa 



[iller, L. E., ...... . Cando, N. Dak 

-inner, E. S Black Rock, York, Pa 



tiller, S. J., 



, McPherson, Kans 



Miller, Andrew, . Eldorado, Preble, Ohio 
Miller, Jonathan, . . . Comet, Ashe, N. C 

Miller, Peter, Jonesboro, Tenn 

Miller, J. M., . . . Eglon, Preston, W. Va 

Miller, D. L., Mt. Morris, III 

Miller, I. N Norborne, Carroll, Mo 

Miller, Hiram G Bridgewater, Va 

Miller, S. C, Robins, Linn, Iowa 

Miller, W. R., 

466 Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 111 
Miller, J. Kurtz, . North Manchester, Ind 
Miller, D. W., .... Robins, Linn, Iowa 
Miller, J. B., . . Woodbury, Bedford, Pa 

Miller, John A., New Lisbon, Ind 

Millspaugh, H. E Oilman, Ind 

Minix, Jos., Lakeside, Cameron Par., La 
Minser; Mark, Decker's Point, Indiana, Pa 
Minnich, Michael, . . Dora, Wabash, Ind 

Mishler. George, Kinzie, Ind 

Mishler, J. G., . . Suffield, Portage, Ohio 
Mitchel, John, . . . Saline City, Clay, Ind 
Moats, John W., . . . Altoona, Polk, Iowa 

Mohler, Wm Falls City, Nebr 

Mohler, Harvey H., . . Warrensburg, Mo 
Mohler, J. S., . . . Morrill, Brown, Kans 

Mohler, John M., Lewistown, Pa 

Mohler, D. M., . . . Warrensburg, Mo 
Mohler, M. S., . . Cornelia, Johnson, Mo 

Mohler, Levi Warrensburg, Mo 

Mohler, Levi S., . . Dillsburg, York, Pa 
Mohler, George, . . . Boyd, Darke, Ohio 
Mohler, J. M., . . Post Oak, Johnson, Mo' 
Mohler, Daniel, . . . Hammond, Piatt, 111 

Moherman, Tully S Ashland, Ohio 

Molsbee, Abraham, .... Nocona, Texas 
Molsbee, J. O., .... Gillenwater, Tenn 
Montgomery, Beniamin, Eagle Rock, Va 
Montgomery, Charles S., . . . Helni^s, Va 
Montgomery, Abraham S., . . Helms, Va 
Montgomery, Riley, . Flora, Carroll, Ind 
Moomaw, P., . Eagle Point, Jackson, Ore 
Moomaw, B. F., . Boasacks, Roanoke, Va 
Moomaw, Kenton B., . . Indian Rock, Va 
Moomaw, Amos, . . Otley, Marion, Iowa 

Moore, P. A., Roanoke, 111 

Moore, Wm. K., . . Nora, Jo Daviess, 111 

Moore, J. H Mt. Morris, Ogle, 111 

Moore, C. W Sand Brook, N. J 

Moore, J. B., Beatrice, Nebr 

Morris, Richard, . . Triplet, Carroll, Mo 

Morrow, Joseph, Ottawa, Kans 

Moss, Aaron, . . . Landess, Grant, Ind 

Mow, A. I Argos, Ind 

Mowry, Hugh R., . . . . Saumesville, Va 
Moyer, H., . Dovesville, Rockingham, Va 
Mummert, Moses, . . . Menge's Mills, Pa 
Munson, A. A., . . LaGranj^'-e, Cass, Mich 
Muntis, Samuel, .... Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Murray, Samuel, Mexico, Ind 

Murray, J. C Nappanee, Ind 

Murray, Wm. A., . . Polk, Ashlaifd, Ohio 
Murray, Jacob A., . . , . . . . Pate, Tenn 
Murray, Fred., . . Champion, Fayette, Pa 
Murray, John, .... Bean Station, Tenn 

Murray, James, Sterling, Ohio 

Murphy, Wm. R., Palatine, Marion, W. Va 
Murphy, George E 

Palatine, Marion, W. Va 

Musselman, Hiram, . . . Scalp Level, Pa 
Musser, Samuel, McVeytown, Mifflin, Pa 
Myers, J. Allen, . McVeytown, Mifflin, Pa 



Myers, Wm., . . . Bourbon, Marshall, Ind 

Myers, R. T., McVeytown, Pa 

Myers, Jacob L.. . . Coleta, Whiteside, 111 
Myers, J. W., .... Fredericksburgh, Pa 
Myers, John, . . Williamson, FranklJjBia 
Myers, S. L., . . . Webber, Jewel^^^Ps 
Myers, C. E., . Tarrs, WestmorelJJB^a 

Myers, H. S Pennsville, Fayette, Pa 

Myers, Isaac, . . Fandon, McDonough, 111 

Myers, Ananias Johnstown, Pa 

Myers, David R., . . New Cambria, Kans 

Myers, Jacob M Giaydon, York, Pa 

Myers, John, . . . Lincoln, Lancaster, Pa 
Myers, Isaac C, . . . . Greenmount, Va 
Myers, T. T., 2029 N. 13th. St 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Myers, Abram, . . Mattawaaa, Mifflin, Pa 
Myers, Andrew, . . . Loganville, York, Pa 

Myers, Christian, Mt. Union, Pa 

Myers, George, . . . Wade, Miami, Kans 
Myers, Michael, 701 Devoe St., . . . 

Creston, Iowa 

Myers, Franklin, . Mt. CAroll, Carroll, 111 
Myers, George S., . . New Enterprise, Pa 

Myers, George W., Laconia, Ind 

Myers, Joseph L., . . Yale, Guthrie, Iowa 

Myers, S.F Altoona, Blair, Pa 

Myers, Samuel, Perrysburg, Miami, Ind 

Myers, Joseph Mt. Pleasant, Pa 

Myers, S. H., Timberville, Va 

Myers, Tobias, . . Sheldon, O'Brien, Iowa 
Myers, Jfhn, . Millstone, Washington, Md 
Myers, .P. S., looi Kuhrts St., . . 

Los Angeles, Cal 

Myler, J.W Battle, Creek, Iowa 

Naff, Daniel Naff's, Franklin, Va 

Naff, W. H., . . . Little River, Floyd, Va 

Naff, John, Salem, Roanoke, Va 

Nead, M Leeseburg, Tenn 

Neal, Wm. F., Packerton, Ind 

Neff, B. W Mt. Jackson, Va 

Neff, A. L., 621 New M. St., Goshen, Ind 

Neff, W. B Milford, Ind 

Neff, David Roann, Wabash, Ind 

Neff, Benjamin, . . Roann, Wabash,' Ind 
Neff, Daniel, . . New Paris, Elkhart, Ind 

Neff, James M., Fruitdale, Ala 

Neff, James, Milford, Ind 

Neher, Amos A., . Mulberry, Clinton, Ind 
Neher, Samuel, . . Petroleum, Wells, Ind 
Neher, Andrew, McCune, Crawford, Kans 

Neher, Martin, McCune, Kans 

Neher, E. J Keuka, Putnam, Fla 

Neher, J. H., McCune, Kans 

Neher, Ananias, Clarkson, Okia 

Neibert, F. J., Broadfording, Md 

Neher, John F., Lordsburg, Cal 

Neisley, David, . . Allen, Cumberland, Pa 
Nelson, N. P., . Reece, Greenwood, Kans 
Ness, Christian, . . . Graydon, York, Pa 
Nevinger, Granville, . . Beecher City, 111 
Newcomer, Melchor S., . . Mt. Morris, 111 

Newcomer, J. S., Mountville, Pa 

Newcomer, E., Mt. Morris, 111 

Newcomer, Samuel I., . . . . Lanark, 111 
Niccum, David H., . . Flora, Carroll, Ind 
Nickey, Amos J., . . . Oakley, Macon, 111 
Nicodemus, Albert, .... Kingsley, Iowa 
Nicola, C. G., . Nicklow, Barbour, W. Va 
Nine, W. F., . . Gormania, Grant,' W. Va 
Nininger, C. E., Ashland, Ore 



44 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



Nissly, Jacob, . . Richland, Lebanon, Pa 
Nofziger, J. P., . . Mascot, Harlan, Nebr 

Norcross, D. A., Glendora, Cal 

Nusbaum, John, Wakarusa, Elkhart, Ind 

«s, P. R Cameron, Mo 
k Lewis, Portland, Ind 
pn, Allen A,, 503 Michigan Ave., 

Logansport, Ind 

Oblinger, Samuel, . . . Waterville, Minn 

Ockerman, J. E Attica, Ohio 

Ockerman, A., Highland, Ohio 

Oellig. C. R Waynesboro, Pa 

Oiler, J. F., Waynesboro, Pa 

Oliver, David H., .... Trotwood, Ohio 
Orr, Samuel, . Brownsville, Licking, Ohio 

Otto, John E., Sharpsburg, Md 

Overfelt, Samuel, .... Gravel Point, Mo 

■ Overholtzer, Derius, Covina, Cal 

Qverholtzer, Peter, Covina, Cal 

Overholt, Jonas, . . . Button, Kent, Mich 

Overton, B. F Palmer, Christian, 111 

Owens, Martin G., . Transon, Ashe, N. C 
Painter, G. W., . . Springport, Henry, Ind 

Palmer, Harrison Esbon, Kans 

Parker, I. D Elkhart, Ind 

Patten, Thomas, Ash Ridge, Wis 

Patten, John, Ash Ridge, Wis 

Patterson, George, . . . Berwinsdale, Pa 

Payton, S. W Connersville, Ind 

Pearsoll, A. L., Ozawkie, Jefferson. Kans 
Peck, Francis M., . . Catalpa, Gove, Kans 
Peck, J. W., . . Meyersdale, Somerset, Pa 

Peck, Lewis Savage, Somerset, Pa 

Peck. Jacob C Falls City, Nebr 

Peifer, L. R., . Hudson, Blackhawk, Iowa 

Pence, J. B., Limestone, Tenn 

Pence, George F Limestone, Tenn 

Perry, J. N., Seward, Kans 

Perry, Oliver, . . . Hillsdale, Barron, Wis 

Peters, Amos Cando, N. Dak 

Peters, Jesse, Laketon, Ind 

Peters, Owen, . . Holmesville, Gage, Nebr 
Peters, Daniel, . . . Helms, Franklin, Va 
Peters, Riley L., . . Helms, Franklin, Va 
Peters, Wm., .... Seven Fountains, Va 
Peterson, Marinus, . . La Blanche, Kans 
Peterson, E., . Hollow Poplar Creek, N. C 

Peterson, Solomon Relief, N. C 

Peterson, John H ReUef, N. C 

Petry, Samuel, Good's Mills, Va 

Petry, Samuel, . . Eldorado, Preble, Ohio 
Petry, Luther, . . Means St., Atlanta, Ga 
Pfautz, J. K., Farmersville, Lancaster, Pa 
Pfoutz. Abraham, . . Cross Kill Mills, Pa 
Pfoutz. C. L., . . Gettysburg, Adams, Pa 

Phillips, W^m. B., Texas, W. Va 

Phillips, David, .... Redkey, Jay, Ind 

Phillips, Geo. A., Hermitage, Va 

Pittenger, John, . Spencer, Medina, Ohio 
Pittman, Henry £., . Loraine, Adams, 111 
Poling, Grodfrey J., . . . Kasson, W. Va 
Pollock, Alvin, . . . Hudson, McLean, 111 

Pollard, R. T Garrett, Somerset, Pa 

Pope, J. W., . . Moorefield, Hardy, W. Va 
Popejoy, Emanuel, . Liberty Centre, Ind 
Popejoy, Wm. A., . . Poneto, Wells, Ind 
Porter, Powell B„ . . Esbon,Jewell, Kans 
Pottinger, Leander, .... Claypool, Ind 

Poulson, Israel Sandy Hook, N. J 

Powel, E. M., . . Chestnut, Amherst, Va 
Prather, M., Creston, Ashe, N. C 



Prather, H. M Creston, Ashe, N. C 

Prather, Enoch, . Hermet, Riverside, Cal 
Price, Isaac, . Pleasant Hill, Miami, Ohio 
Price. David E., . . Mt. Morris, Ogle, 111 

Price, J. M Harleysville, Pa 

Price, B. E Waynesboro, Pa 

Price, J. H., . . Richlandtown, Bucks, Pa 
Price, Geo., . Courtland, Republic, Kans 
Price, M. V., .... Harrison. Boone, Ark 

Price, Henry A., Harleysville, Pa 

Price, Joseph, . . . Lineboro, Carroll, Md 
Price, Jonas P., . . . . Elizabethtown, Pa 
Pricket, L. E., . . . . Pioneer. Barry, Mo 
Pringle, Joseph, Edenton, Clermont, Ohio 
Prough, Daniel, .... Cabool, Texas. Mo 
Prowant, Daniel, . Dupont, Putnam, Ohio 
Prowant, John, . . Dupont, Putnam, Ohio 
PuUen, Wm. H., Parkerford, Chester, Pa 
Puffenbarger, Amos, Sugar Grove, W. Va 
Pursley, A. F., . . . Maple, Botetourt, Va 

Pursley, Wm. T Saltpetre Cave, Va 

Puterbaugh, D. B Mt. Morris, 111 

Puterbaugh, A. H., Oswego, Ind 

Puterbaugh, A., Ozawkie, Jefferson, Kans 

Pyle, W. H Hansen, Franklin, Iowa 

Pysel, Jacob, . . . Accident, Garrett, Md 
Quinn, Wm. H., 117 4th St., Canton, Ohio 

Racer, John A., Kimball, Va 

Raffensberger, Levi, . Franklin Grove, 111 
Rairigh, Isaiah. . Woodland. Barry, Mich 
Rairigh, Isaac, . . Campbell, Ionia, Mich 
Rairigh, Geo. S., Johnstown, Cambria, Pa 
Ralston, Jesse E.. Mt. Solon. Augusta, Va 
Rarick, Jacob. . Royerton. Delaware, Ind 
Rambow, George, . Doud's Station. Iowa 

Ream, James F., Scalp Level, Pa 

Reber, Jonathan G.,Centreport, Berks, Pa 
Redding. L. J., Golden Springs, Burt, Nebr 
Reed, A. J., . Scottsville, Alleghany, N. C 
Reed, Samuel. . . Progress. Dauphin, Pa 
Reed, Isaac, . . . Alum Ridge. Floyd. Va 
Reed, Albert P., Elmville. Highland. Ohio 
Reed, Henry, . . Alum Ridge, Floyd, Va 
Reed, Ross E., . . . Morgantown, W. Va 

Reed, Peter D., Limestone, Tenn 

Reed, Noah, . . . Alum Ridge, Floyd, Va 
Reed, Samuel P.. Alum Ridge, Floyd, Va 
Reed, Wyatt. . . Alum Ridge, Floyd, Va 
Reese, J. W..' . . Jerry City. Wood, Ohio 
Reeves, Alford, .... Gillett, Clay, Iowa 
Reichard, W. Scott, . . Hagerstown, Md 
Reidenbach. R.. Hinkleton, Lancaster, Pa 
Reiman, S. F., . . . Berlin, Somerset, Pa 

Renner, Eli, Otego, Jewell, Kans 

Renner. F. C New Midway, Md 

Rensberger, Melvin, .... Goshen, Ind 

Replogle, Martin Unionville, Iowa 

Replogle, Joseph Z Waterside, Pa 

Replogle, J. B., . Woodbury, Bedford, Pa 
Replogle, David, Rogersville, Henry, Ind 
Reynolds, W. W., . Rogers, Benton, Ark 
Rhodes, D. B., . . Rockingham. Ray, Mo 
Richard, Wolford. . . . Waterville. Minn 
Richard. D. R., . Fortville. Hancock, Ind 
Richard, A., Woodstock. Shenandoah, Va 
Richardson, J., . . Meadow Bluff, W. Va 
Richardson. Scott, .... Mill Grove, Ind 
Ritchey, Wm.. . . Foreman, Bedford, Pa 
Riddlesberger, Isaac. Quincy, Franklin, Pa 
Ridenour, John, . Garrison. Benton, Iowa 
Rider, Sherman. New Hope, Jackson, Ind 



Rife, Jacob Boston, Wayne, Ii 

Rife, Joseph D., . Converse, Wabash, Ij 

Riggle, Daniel, Goshen, Ii 

Riggleman, John, . Blue Springs, W. ^ 
Rinehart, Abram, . . . Onward, Cass, Ii 

Riner, Samuel Oak Hill, W. ^ 

Rinker, Nicholas, . Dobbin, Grant, W. "' 

Ritchey, Samuel Yellow Creek, '. 

Rittenhouse, E. M., . . . Primrose, 01 
Ritzins, Henry, Leiter's Ford, Fulton. I 
Ritzins, Noah, Leiter's Ford, Fulton, Ii 
Roberson, Wm., . . . Wirtz, Franklin, ^ 
Robertson, J. M., . Macomb. Wright, I 
Robinson, J. F., . . Salem, Forsyth, N. 
Robinson, T. A., . Media, Douglas. Ka 

Robeson, Jesse J Lonaconing. I 

Robison, Joseph Carey, 01 

Rodebaugh, A., . . CoUins, St. Clair, 1 
Rodabaugh, Wilhs, Frederic, Monroe, lo 
Rodecker, Thomas, Mendon, Mercer, 01 
Rodgers, Levi, . . Six Roads, Bedford, 

Rodgers, John C Hartford City, I 

Roller, M. G., New Market. 

Rose, W. A., Booth, Reno, K£ 

Roose, Eli Buchanan, M 

Roose, Hiram, . Wakarusa, Elkhart, 1 

Roop, Israel Attica, Seneca, Q. 

Roop, Joel, . . New Windsor. Carroll, 1 

Roop, Jesse New Windsor, ] 

Roop, Wm. E., Westminster, Carroll, ] 
Root, C. C, . . Ozawkie, Jefferson, K; 
Root, WiUis E., Bijou Hills, Brule, S. E 
Root, Andrew, .... Centropolis, K; 
Root, John A., . Ozawkie, Jefferson, K; 

Ross, Henry. Ottawa, K; 

Rosenberger, I. J., . . . Covington, O 

Rosenberger, A. S Covington, O 

Rosenberger, E. H., . . McComb, O 
Rothenberger. Daniel, North Webster, ] 
Rothgeb, Martin. .... Massaunton, 
Rothrock, E. S.. . Carlisle. Fillmore, N 
Rotruck, W. D.. Knobley. Mineral, W. 
Rowe, Chas., .... Grimes, Polk, Ic 
Rowland, Abraham, . . Hagerstown, 

Rowland, John, Reid, 

Rowland, David, . . . Lanark, Carroll 
Rowland, C. P., . . . Lanark, Carroll 
Royer, J. G., . . . . Mt. Morris, Ogle. 
Royer, Galen B., . . Mt. Morris, Ogle. 

Royer, S. D Bradford, O 

Royer, Josiah A., Damascus, * 

Royer, Jesse E., Holliday, 

Rufner, George, . . Fairfield Centre, . 
Rutf, Edward, . . . Argos. Marshall, 
Rupert, S. G., . . . Lewistown, ]\Iifflin,i 
Rupel. Andrew, . . . North Liberty, 
Rush, John S., Yellow Creek, Bedford,! 

Rust, Raburn S., Valley City, 

Ruthrauff, John B Waynesboro, 

Ryan, Jacob Alvo, Cass. N 

Ryman, John L., Saumsville. 

Sadler, J., . Lime Springs, Howard, L 
Sadler, J. W., Lime Springs, Howard, L 
Sala, G. W., . Montpelier, Blackford. 
Sanders. A. W., Litchfield, Sherman, In 
Sandy, Jacob D,, . . . Donnellsville, C 

Sanger. S. F., Bridgewater, 

Sanger, S, A., Scottsford, 

Sanger, Anthony, . Keota, Keokuk, I 
Sanger, Martin, . . Fayetteville, W, 
Sappington, Geo. K., . . . Johnsville, 



Brethren* s Family Almanac. 



45 



lyler, Levi, . . . Quarry, Marshall, Iowa 
ylor, D. R., . . . Mechanicstown, Md 
itterfield. Benj. F Overhill, W. Va 



itterfield, S. C, 



Oak Grove, Tenn 



' itterfield, John, .... Oak Grove, Tenn 

'*''' :aggs, Lewis C,, Auburn, Va 

"■' fhickle, Joseph, Thaxton's, Va 

'' :hlosser, John, Schoeneck, Lancaster, Pa 
''' :hwalm, H. M., .... Mishawaka, Ind 
'^' ;hmidt, John, . Strawberry Point, Iowa 
'"'" :hultz, Joshua, . Ellwood, Chnton, Iowa 
"' '' :as, Oliver, . . . Nashville, Barry, Mich 
''"'' icrist, Caleb, . . . Cordova, Talbot, Md 

'"'1 iibert, J. C, Lone Tree, Iowa 

''^' jeber, Solomon, . . Thompsontown, Pa 
'•^411, James A., .... McKee's, Blair, Pa 

'»'' 11, Brice, Newry, Blair, Pa 

'0' 11, David Newry, Blair, Pa 

"''' 11, Joseph B., . . Cameron, Clinton, Mo 
«'« 11, Daniel D., . Plattsburg, Clinton, Mo 

f-01 11, Wm. B Grenola, Kans 

'fUll, Albert K., Batchelder, Okla 

tJ'l Hers, G. W Bryan, Ohio 

'''' Hers, John, . . Bourbon, MarshaH, Ind 
|1^^ nger, D. B., . . Franklin Grove, Lee, 111 
'■^Mrgeon, Stephen, . . Jonesville, Lee, Va 
"■''1 tty, Sanford, . . Sinking Springs, Ohio 
I'f^' lahan, George, . . Hannahville, W. Va 
o'U lafer. Wm. H., . VaUey Furnace, W. Va 
'»f|! affer, Levi, .... Beatrice, Gage Nebr 
oil' affer, Daniel D., . . . . Scalp Level, Pa 

1 "^ affer, Joseph, Hooversville, Pa 

S'll amberger, Jesse, . Sheridan, Worth, Mo 
ij) amberger, Geo. A., .... Roanoke, La 
\^*- ank, Emmanuel, West Alexandria, Ohio 

Ui ank, J.B Greene, Iowa 

BiOl arp, S. Z., McPherson, Kans 

n.Ol arp, B. F Cosmos, Ohio 

»i01 aver, S. A., Maurertown, Va 

tef.l aver, Isaac, . . Copper Hill, Floyd, Va 

ton, eaffer, D. J Lordsburg, Cal 

e,Ni eets, E. M., . . . . Lansing, Ashe, N. C 
,W. eets, Adam, . . . Lansing, Ashe, N. C 

Uo eets, Henry, Clifton, N. C 

nJ eets, Andrew, . . Gray, Alleghany, N. C 
^iil eets, Jesse, .... Lansing, Ashe, N. C 



ellaberger, John, .... Rockford, Ohio 

eUenberger, S. H. Stanton, Iowa 

ellenberger, J. B., . . . Bannerville, Pa 
epherd, John Ashe Ridge, Wis 

d.O epler, Isaac, Bunker HiU, Ind 

iiSi' epier, Joseph, . . . . Peru, Miami, Ind 

erfy, S. S., Johnson City, Tenn 

erfy, N. B., Blountville, Sullivan, Tenn 
erfy, John, . . . Michigan VaUey, Kans 
erfy, W. A., . . . . Morning Star, Tenn 
errick, M. M., 1223 Sth Ave., E., 

. . Cedar Rapids, Iowa 
ick, Urias, . . Holmesville, Gage, Nebr 
ickel, Jos., . . . Roanoke, Roanoke, Va 

Ni ideler, Daniel, Majenica, Ind 

ideler, Henry, .... Monmouth, Kans 

rdiltfirk, Jacob B., Ramona, Kans 

irkey, Samuel B., Rockingham, Ray, Mo 
rkey, John H., . Rockingham, Ray, Mo 
tvely, G. B., . . Nappanee, Elkhart, Ind 

ively, John W Bourbon, Ind 

ively, David Etna Green, Ind 

ively, Joel. . . Osceola, St. Joseph, Ind 

uUijively, Jacob B., Burr Oak, Marshall, Ind 
vely, John, , . . . . Flora, CarroU, Ind 

ville, 



Shively, Aaron, Bayard, Columbiana, Ohio 

Shively, Daniel P Nead, Miami, Ind 

Shively, G. W., . . Kossuth, Clarion, Pa 

Shively, John K Avilla, Mo 

Shively, Green, .... White Springs, Pa 
Sholty, B. F., . . Pioneer, WiHiams, Ohio 
Shong, Daniel, Sherwood, Defiance, Ohio 

Shope, Adam J,, Harrisburg, Pa 

Shope, David F., Saltillo, Huntingdon, Pa 
Shoop, S. B., MapleviHe, Washington, Md 
Shotts, M. C, . . . - Flint, Steuben, Ind 

Showalter, Simon Richfield, Pa 

Showalter, P. H., Meyerhoeffer's Store, Va 
Shower, R. B., . . Aurora, Madison, Ark 
Shrock, W. G., - . . Berhn, Somerset, Pa 

Shrock, Eli, La Grange, Ind 

Shrock, C, . . Middlebury, Elkhart, Ind 
Shroyer, Reuben, . . Pierce, Stark, Ohio 
Shroyer, Daniel, , . . Carroll, Clinton, Pa 

Shuck, Samuel Liverpool, 111 

Shultz, John F., Chenoa, IH 

Shutt, H. M., . . Baltic, Tuscarawas, Ohio 
Shutt, N. H., . Brighton, La Grange, Ind 
Shreve, R. J., . Waterford, La Porte, Ind 
Simmons, Thos. J., Osceola, St. Clair, Mo 
Simmons, Wm. K., . . . Union City, Ind 

Simmons, Alfred T Everett, Pa 

Sines, W. T., . . . Oakland, Garrett, Md 
Sines, Emmanuel, .... Canaan, W. Va 
Sisler, S. A., . . Portland, Preston, W. Va 
Sissler, M., . Dallas Centre, Dallas, Iowa 

Slingluff, John U Sidney, Nebr 

Sloatman, Samuel, Missouri Valley, Iowa 
Slusher, J. H., . . Floyd C. H., Floyd, Va 
Smeltzer, Elias, . Arcadia, Hamilton, Ind 

Smeltzer, Moses NoblesviHe, Ind 

Smith, L. S., 1548 Pacific Ave 

Atchison, Kans 

Smith, John, . Woodberry, Baltimore, Md 
Smith, John, Trotwood, Montgomery, Ohio 

Smith, Wm., 3 Hoyle, Okla 

Smith, S. M CampbeH, Ionia, Mich 

Smith, John I., . . . . Wray, Yuma, Colo 
Smith, J. M., . . Woodland, Barry, Mich 
Smith, Albert J., . . . Adrian, Bates, Mo 
Smith, W. S., . . . . Eden's Ridge, Tenn 
Smith, H. J., Herington, Dickinson, Kans 

Smith, David, Union Deposit, Pa 

Smith, Adam R., Rokeby, Lancaster, Nebr 
Smith, Daniel,^ . . Cuba, Republic, Kans 

Smith, Benj, Barnes' MiHs, W\ Va 

Smith, C. B., Beatrice, Nebr 

Smith, T.M., Wolf Glade, Va 

Smith, Emanuel J., Lynn, Okla 

Snavely, John L., . . . . Alvo, Cass, Nebr 
Snell, Jacob S., . . Collamer, Whitley, Ind 
Snell, Daniel, . . Sidney, Kosciusko, Ind 

Snider, Jacob Waynesboro, Pa 

Snively, J. S Lanark, 111 

Snoeberger, A. L., Newton, Harvey, Kans 
Snowberger, Joseph, . Williamsburg, Pa 
Snowberger, A. C, . . Monte Vista, Colo 
Snowberger, Isaac N., Flint, Steuben, Ind 
Snader, David, . . Akron, Lancaster, Pa 

Snyder, David Ashland, Ohio 

Snyder, J. M., McPherson, Kans 

Snyder, T. G., .... Robins, Linn, Iowa 

Snyder, J. S Brooklyn, Iowa 

Snyder, L. S., . . . Missouri Valley, Iowa 
Solenberger, Jacob, .... Naperville, 111 
SoUenberger, Aaron D., . . Pickrell, Nebr 



Solomon, J. J., Shoals, Ind 

Sonefrank, George, . . McGrawsville, Ind 
Sonon, Henry S., . . East Petersburg, Pa 

Sours, H. F., .... Long, Va 

Spacht, J. R., . New Stark, Hancock, 01^ 
Spanogle, Andrew, .... Lewisto\^^^B ♦«^. 
Spangler, S. G., . Floyd C. H., Flo^^V * * 
Spangler, John, . . Huffville, FIo^I^b 
Speicher, Jacob, . . . Bills, Somerset, Pa 
Spicher, John W., . Hillsdale, Indiana, Pa 
Spicher, J., . Waterloo. Blackhawk, Iowa 

Spicher, M. H Ord, Pa 

Spitler, Samuel Long, Va 

Sprang, Godfry, . . . White Pigeon, Mich 
Sprankle, Samuel, Massillon, Stark, OJiio 

Spitzer, Joseph F Markle, Ind 

Spitzer, Jacob, Cherry Grove, Va 

Sprague, Byron, .... La Blanche, Kans 
Stahl, Herman A., Gebhart's, Somerset, Pa 
Stafford, John, Spencerville, DeKalb, Ind 
Stayer, J. C, . . Woodbury, Bedford, Pa 

Stayer, J. R., Roaring Spring, Pa 

Stayer, John S Roaring Spring, Pa 

Stambaugh, G. W., McCool Junction, Nebr 
Stamy, J. F., . . . Lee's Cross Roads, Pa 

Starkey, J. H Griffithsville, W. Va 

Steckley, Henry, . . Garrett, DeKalb, Ind 
Stees, Israel, .... Lena, Stephenson, 111 
Steinberger, Albert, . . . Lewistown, Pa 
Steffen, Conrad, . . . Newark, Lewis, Mo 
Stephens, Rezin, West Manchester, Ohio 
Stevens, S. M., .... Cabool, Texas, Mo 

Stickler, W. E., CentervHle, Iowa 

Stieneke, F. T., Aurelia, Iowa 

Stitzel, Joseph Lanark, CarroH, 111 

Stiverson, J. U. G., . . . . Moscow, Idaho 
Stockmyer, Wm., Harding, Bourbon, Kans 

Stone, G. E Carson City, Mich 

Stone, C. H., . . Edgewood, Clayton, Iowa 
Stone, Henry, . Edgewood, Clayton, Iowa 

Stoneburner, Levi Warsaw, Ind 

Stoner, David, . Johnsville, Frederick, Md 
Stoner, J. C, . Hutsonville, Crawford, 111 
Stoner, D. W., . . Vesper, Lincoln, Kans 

Stoner, Levi, Huntingdon, Pa 

Stoner, Solomon, Uniontown, Carroll, Md 
Stoner, E. W., Union Bridge, CarroU, Md 

Stoner, Samuel D Ladoga, Ind 

Stookey, Sherman Fandon, 111 

Stong, G. W Cando, N. Dak 

Stout, W. J., . . . Crown, Decatur, Iowa 

Stouffer, M., Mansfield, Piatt, 111 

Stouffer, E. H., . Garrison, Benton, Iowa 
Stouffer, Ephraim, . . New Windsor, Md 

Stouffer, D. F., Benevola, Md 

Stouffer. Benj., Maryland, 111 

Stouffer, S. M., Green Spring, Pa 

Stouder, David W., .... Madison, Kans 

Stouder, Jas. A Madison, Kans 

Stout, John, . . Millwood, Kosciusko, Ind 
Strausburg, John, . . . Jalapa, Grant, Ind 
Strickler, Baptist H., Loraine, Adams, 111 
Strickler, H. W., . . . Loraine, Adams, IH 
Strickler, Henry P., Grundy Center, Iowa 

Strickler, D. H., Vicksburg, Pa 

Strickler, Walter, Luray, Va 

Strickler, Ellis, Ramona, Kans 

Stroup, Eh, Homeworth, Columbiana.Ohio 
Strycker, Geo,, . . Peabody, Marion, Kans 
Stuckey, Simon B., . . Paris, Stark, Ohio 
Stuckey, Levi, .... New Enterprise, Pa 



46 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



Stuckman, P., . . Nappanee, Elkhart, Ind 
Studabaker, Simon E., Summerfield, Kans 
Studabaker, George E., McPherson, Kans 
Studabaker, Jesse, .... Mont Ida, Kans 
Studabaker, Samuel, .... Pearl City, 111 

j^ flj^^aker, G, W Fredonia, Kans 

^ l^^^nkcr, Isaac S., . . . Casstown, Ohio 
a^HPIker, J. U., . Eaton, Delaware, Ind 
Studabaker, Ephraim, Hay Springs, Nebr 
Studabaker, Geo. L., . . . . Shideler, Ind 

Stump, Solomon Waynesville, Mo 

Stump, George C, . . Baker, Darke, Ohio 

Stump, John, Miami, Texas 

Sturgis, D. B., Mulberry Grove, Bond, 111 

Sturgis, John , Perrin, Mo 

Stutsman, Jesse, Pitsburg, Darke, Ohio 
Stutsman, J. R., . . Harbor Springs, Mich 

Stutsman, B. F., Goshen, Ind 

Summy, Abraham, .... Kecksburg, Pa 
Sunderland, Henry, Carthage, Jasper, Mo 

Suter, CM., Ashton, Lee, 111 

Sutten, A. A., Roanoke, La 

Swab, John Valley, Clarion, Pa 

Swigart, S. J., . . . Lewistown, MifRin, Pa 

Swigart, W. J Huntingdon, Pa 

Swigart, G. H., McVeytown, Pa 

Swigart, J. C, . Strode's Mills, Mifflin, Pa 
Swihart, David, . . Roann, Wabash, Ind 
Swihart, Aaron, . . . Argos, Marshall, Ind 
Swihart, Geo., . . . Argos, Marshall, Ind 

Swihart, Jacob, Churubusco, Ind 

Swihart, Neri, .... Bigfoot, Fulton, Ind 

Swihart, George T., Goshen, Ind 

Swinger, Jacob, Hutsonville, Crawford, 111 
Swonger, Michael, . . . Logansville, Ohio 
Talhelm, Humphrey, . Washington, Kans 
Taylor, Allen, . Mulberry Grove, Bond, 111 

Taylor, H. R., Deep River, Iowa 

Taylor, I. W., Vogansville, Pa 

Teats, L. W., . Lost River, Hardy, W. Va 
Teeter, Lewis W., . . . Hagcrstown, Ind 
Teeter, W. C, 17 Horace St., Dayton, Ohio 
Teeter, D. W., . . Jasper City, Jasper, Mo 
Teeter, Lewis L-. Rogersville, Henry, Ind 

Thomas, Isaac, Alvo, Cass, Nebr 

Thomas, D. D., . . . Williamstown, Ohio 

Thomas, Michael Somerfield, Pa 

Thomas, David, Bangor, Van Buren, Mich 
Thomas. J. L., .... Prairie City, Iowa 
Thomas, G. W., .... Ames, Story, Iowa 

Thomas, Jacob Spring Creek, Va 

Thomas, Wm. J., . . Boone, Boone, Iowa 
Thomas, Wm., .... Gibbon's Glade, Pa 
Thomas, S. B., . . Carey, Wyandot, Ohio 
Thomas, Jeremiah, . Clifton Mills, W. Va 
Thomas, Abram, .... Spring Creek, Va 
Thompson, Samuel, .... Sycamore, Ind 

Thompson, I. O Kearney, Md 

Thompson, Stephen, . . . Fredonia, Kans 
Throne, Geo. M,, . . Rockwell City, Kans 
Tilsman, A. L., Lindside, Monroe, W. Va 

Titler, , . . . Dupont, Putnam, Ohio 

Titus, Albert, . . Carlisle, Fillmore, Nebr 

Tingley, H., Jerico, Cedar, Mo 

Tombaugh, Jacob, . . . Middletown, Mich 
Toney, Carey, Connersville, Fayette, Ind 

Toney, W. S., Walton, Cass, Ind 

Tow, William Cana, Va 

Trapp, Nicholas, Altamont, Labette, Kans 
Trimmer, Peter, . . . Mulberry, York, Pa 
Trostle, J. D., . . Hope, Dickinson, Kans 



Trostle, J. W., Kingsley, Plymouth, Iowa 
Trostle, Wm., . Kingsley, Plymouth, Iowa 

Trostle, Eph Mt. Morris, 111 

Trostle, John Gettysburg, Pa 

Trostle, Levi, Franklin Grove, 111 

Troup, Henry H., Maxwell, Iowa 

Trout, I. Bennett, . . New Carlisle, Ohio 
Troxel, J.J., . . . Mountain Grove, Mo 
Troxel, Jacob, . . Conway Springs, Kans 
Troxel, David, . . Cerro Gordo, Piatt, 111 

Troxel, Henry, Burnett, Okla 

Tucker, John, Hager's Grove, Shelby, Mo 
Turner John H., - - 

.... Darksville, Berkley, W. Va 
Turner, Daniel, .... Coote's Store, Va 
Tyson, George, . . West Mill Grove, Ohio 
Tyson, Abram, S., Mansfield, Wright, Mo 
Ulery, Gabriel, . . North Manchester, Ind 
Ulery, S. Stephen, North Manchester, Ind 
Ulery, Daniel, .... Foxville, Marion, 111 
Ullery, John, . . . Pyrmont, Carroll, Ind 

Ullery, Jacob, Grenola, Kans 

Ullery, Jacob La Place, Piatt, 111 

Ullom, Homer, . . . Friend, Scott, Kans 
Umbel, Samuel, . . . Markleysburg, Pa 
Utz, S. H., . New Market, Frederick, Md 
Utz, John H., . Union Bridge, Carroll, Md 

Utz, J.H., Martinsburg, W. Va, 

VanBuren, T. D., Edson, Wis 

VanDyke, Archy, Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 
VanDyke, Perry, . . . Norway, Coos, Ore 

Vanhorn, Daniel M Foreman, Pa 

Vaniman, Daniel, . . . McPherson, Kans 

Vaniman, A. W Topeka, Kans 

Varner, Daniel, . . . Sugar Grove, W. Va 
Varner, Wm., . . Doe Hill, Highland, Va 
Vetter, J. W., . . Prymont, Carroll, Ind 
Vines, Andrew J., . . . . Jonesboro, Tenn 
Wageman, Jonathan G., . Tyner City, Ind 

Wagner, D. T., Beecher City, 111 

Wagoner, Noah B., . . . Red Cloud, Nebr 
Wakefield, R. M., . . . Shirleysburg, Pa 

Wakeman. J. W., Harrisville, Va 

Walker, Daniel H., . . Lull, Somerset, Pa 
Walker, S. A., . Bloomville, Seneca, Ohio 
Wallace, A., . . . Little Rock, Saline, Mo 
Wallace, Lewis, . . . Maryland, Ogle, 111 
Wallick, A. B., . . Mammoth Spring, Ark 
Wampler, Fred., .... Greenmount, Va 

Wampler, D.S Lonaconing, Md 

Wampler, Amos, .... Knobnoster, Mo 
Warren, Edward, .... Sevastopol, Ind 
Warren, Chas., . Pennville, Clearfield, Pa 
Watkins, Lafayette, . . . Mont Ida, Kans 
Watkins, Thomas, .... Mt. Morris, 111 
Watts, Wm.S., Brentwood 

Washington, Ark 

Weaver, Joseph, . . Ligonier, Noble, Ind 
Weaver. Joel, . . Monticello, White, Ind 

Weaver, D. H., Longmont, Colo 

Weaver, Christian, . Brimfield, Noble, Ind 

Weaver, John E Goshen, Ind 

Weaver, A. A., .... Warrensburg, Mo 
Webb, Isaac E., New Market, Taylor, Iowa 
Weber, John, Dallas Centre, Dallas, Iowa 
Weddle, Harvey, . . . Topeco, Floyd, Va 
Weddle, Joel, . . Burk's Fork, Floyd, Va 
Weddle, George, . - Dunlap, Lyon, Kans 
Weddle, Andrew J., . . Santos, Floyd, Va 

Weddle, R. M Dunlap, Kans 

Wehrley, J. P Flint, Steuben, Ind 



Weidman, Silas, . Burbank, Wayne, Oh 
Weily, Wm., . . . Franklintown, York, 1 
Weimer, Dennis, . Bealton, Fauquier, '\ 

Weimer, Samuel, Wyman, Ai 

Weimer, F, B., . . Sterling, Wayne, Oh 
Weirich, Jacob, . . Osnaburg, Stark, Oh 
Wellington, J. R., . . Reed, Delaware, Ii 
Weller, Jacob, Millstone, Washington, N! 

Weller, M.J Markleysburg, I 

Wells, J. M., Kalamazoo, Barbour, W. \ 
Wells, Reed, . . . McDonald's Mills, > 

Wenger, Levi A Mt. Sidney, "S 

Wenger, Israel, . Lincoln, Lancaster, 1 
Wenger, Ed, Fredericksburg, Lebanon, 1 
Wertz, John, .... Quinter, Gove, Ka 
West, Landon, . . . Lanier, Preble, Oh 

Westrick, O., Dubois, Ne 

Wetzel, Paul University, C 

Weyand, Michael, . . Lull, Somerset, I 
Weybright, Wm., . Alfred, Douglas, Ka 

Weybright, John S., 

. . . Double Pipe Creek, R 

Wheeler, Elliot, Gridley, Ka 

Wheeler, Frank M., ... Rockton, lo) 
Whetstone, David, Minnesota City, Mh 

Whistler, Levi, Longmont, Cc 

Whisler, H. A., Unionville, lo) 

Whisler, Samuel, . . North Liberty, Oh 
Whitestine, Wm., . Modena, Mercer, J 
Whitmer, Daniel, .... South Bend, Ii 
Whitmer, B. B., . . Quinter, Gove, Ka 

Whitmer, Peter, Hamlin, Ka 

Whitmer, John Union Deposit, ] 

Wickham, Samuel S. M., Copper Hill, '' 
Wickham, L. D., . Pilot, Montgomery, ■■ 

Wieand. T. C Madisonburg, 01 

Wieand, Albert C, . . . McPherson, Ka 

Wiedman, Frederick, 

McCcol Junction, Ne 

Wike, Henry, . . River, Huntington, I 
Wike, Isaac, . . . Moorcland, Henry, I 

Wiley, Wm Dillsburg, York, 

Wilfong, Benjamin Edray, W. 

Wilkins, Geo. C Hollowtown, 01 

Wilkins, C. L., . . . Harrod, Allen, 01 
Wilmoth, Wm. . . Top Alleghany, W. 

Wilt, J. W., Altoona, Blair, 

Wilt, Lloyd T., . Watson, Marion, W. 
Wilson, Josiah, Belington, Barbour, W. 
Wilson, J. H., Crothersville, Jackson, I 

Wilson, James, Wilmoth, W 

Winand, Geo., . York Springs, Adams, 

Wine, Geo. S., Herington, K; 

Wine, D. D., Covington, O 

Wine, Geo. W Ottobine, 

Wine, C Newbury Park, 

Wine, Joseph, Blountville, Sullivan, Tt 
Wine, Jacob, . Oak Grove, Jefferson, Tt 

Wine, John M Octavia, N 

Wine, Jacob, . Ottobine, Rockingham, 

Wine, Geo. S Bolivar, Polk. 

Wine, Samuel, .... Jasper, Jasper, 
Wine, Daniel D., . . Nevada, Vernon, 

Wine, D. P., Moore's Store, 

Wine, W. M, Winchester, 

Wine, John, Oak Grove, T 

Wineman, D. B., . . Upper Strasburg, 

Winey, C. G., East Salem, 

Winey, Thomas Lawrence, K 

Wingard, Jos. D., . . Oxford, Talbot, 
Winger, H. H., Overland, Orapahoe, C 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



47 



Winger, David Claylick, Pa 

Winkleblake, Levi, . . Hartford City, Ind 
Wirt, John H., Lewistown, Winona, Minn 

Wirt, Jacob Lewistown, Minn 

Wirt, James, Virden, 111 

'fWise, David, . . . Watson, Seneca, Ohio 

'IWise, Adam, .... Glen Easton, W. Va 

Wise, W. M., Appanoose, Douglas, Kans 

Wise, Geo. E., . . Olathe, Johnson, Kans 

Wise, A. A., Middlebury, Ind 

Wise, John, . . . Conway Springs, Kans 

Witmore, Jacob McPherson, Kans 

Witmore, J. C, . . Longley, Wood, Ohio 

iW^olf, David, Peru, Miami, Ind 

Wolf, Daniel, . Fairplay, Washington, Md 
Wolf, Abraham, .... Libertyville, Iowa 
Wolf, Leonard, McCune, Crawford, Kans 

Wolf, Hiram J., Nevada, Mo 

p'jWolf, D. S Collington, Md 

J \Volfe, E. M., Monmouth, Kans 

^Vood, T. C, . . . . Whittle's Station, Va 
Wood, Chas. H., . Snowden, Amherst, Va 

Woods, Charles M Spencer, Ohio 

Voodward, A. B., Gowrie, Webster, Iowa 
jjjjWoody, John C, . . Transom, Ashe, N. C 
,^] Workman, Wm., . . . Loudonville, Ohio 
Workman, Lewis Pier 



irceton, Ind 



Workman, David, . . Columbia City, Ind 
Workman, John, . . Jelloway, Knox, Ohio 
Workman, James, . . Rolla, Knox, Ohio 
Workman, Philip, . Mabel, Linn, Oregon 
Workman, C. J., ■ . Buckeye City, Ohio 

Workman, S.J Ankneytown, Ohio 

Workman, A, S., . . . Loudonville, Ohio 

Worst, Geo., Ashland, Ohio 

Worst, David, Lattasburgh, Wayne, Ohio 
Worstler, J. H., . New Paris, Elkhart, Ind 
Wright, A. L., . . North Manchester, Ind 
Wright, J. H., . . North Manchester, Ind 
Wrjghtsman, P. R., . . . . Navarre, Kans 
Wysong, Dajiiel, Nappanee, Elkhart, Ind 
Yaney, Frank, . . New Corydon, J.:y, Ind 
Yankey, F. A., Crider's, Rockingham, \'a 
Yearout, Chas. M., . . Westphalia, Kans 
Yoder, R. A., . . Sabetha, Nemaha, Kans 
Yoder, Stephen, Holmesville, Gage, Nebr 

-Yoder, Y. D Lima, La Grange, Ind 

Yoder, J. J., . Monitor, McPherson, Kans 
Yoder, John, Jr., . Benton, Holmes, Oliio 
Younce, Davis, Syracuse, Kosciusko, Ind 
Young, David, . Mogadore, Summit, Ohio 

Young, I. R., Lanark, 111 

Young, H. S., ... New Berlin, Stark, Ohio 
Young, John E Beatrice, Nebr 



Young, Theodore B., 
Young, E. S., . 
Young, A. C, . 
Younger, S. S., . 
Yount, V\\ B., . 
Younce, Samuel, 




Wichita, Kans 
North Manchester, Ind 
. Eaton, Delaware, Ind 
Bethany, Moultrie, 111 
.... Bridgewatj 
. Eaton, Delaw; 

Yourtee, Eli, Browns\^ 

Yundt, Simon E Mt. Mo^^^l 

Zern, Jacob, . . Amherst, Phillips, Colo 
Ziegler, D. P., Tower City, Schuylkill, Pa 
Ziegler, Jesse C, . . . . Royer's Ford. Pa 

Zigler, Samuel, Mayland, Va 

Zigler, John P., "• . Mayland, Va 

Zigler, D. C, . . • Stover, Augusta, Va 

Zigler, D. II., Mayland, Va 

Zimmerman, Jacob S., . . Davidsville, Pa 
Zimmerman, Joseph. . . - Rehobotli, Ind 
Zimmerman, S., Davidsville, Somerset, Pa 
Zimmerman, Jacob, . . . . Mt. Solon, Va 

Zollers, Geo. D Wacker, Carroll, 111 

Zook, Daniel, Birmingham, Iowa 

Zuck, D. M., Mercersburgh, Pa 

Zuck, John, .... Clarence, Cedar, Iowa 
Zug, S. R., Mastersonville, Lancaster, Pa 
Zug, H. S., Mastersonville, Lancaster, Pa 
Zumbrun, C. K., . . Merriam, Noble, Ind 



Wolf's Business College, 

Hagerstown, Md. 



3rk,I 



Courses: Business, Shorthand and Typewriting, 
'^jjTelegraphy and Preparatory. 

Young men and women trained for the practical 
iffairs of life, fitted for office work, and helped to 
jjjecure situations when competent. 

Due attention given to the building up of charac- 
W.ler, morals and manners. 

°|| All the advantages of church, Sunday school, and 
issociating with the Brethren. 

A good school, in a healthy town, without the 
W.|ieavy expenses and temptations of large cities. 

D. Elmer Wolf, Principal. 



Brethren in the South. 



If you want to go South for a home, for pleasure, business or 
ealth, be sure to stop at 

FRUITDALE, ALA., 

Where the Brethren have regular church services, a public 
ome for travelers, health or pleasure seekers, with doctor and 
urses in attendance, in case of sickness, and a good school for 
le education of yourself or your children. Climate unusually 
lild, pleasant and healthful, land very cheap, and special low 
lilroad rates, via Mobile & Ohio R. R., from St. Louis to Mo- 
;le and return. Address 

Brethren's School Co., 

Fruitdale, Ala., 



Or 



L. H. Funk, 

Mt. Morris, 111. 



WILD ROSE SHEEP FARM 

The Home of the Hardy Cheviot Sheep. 




Howard H. Kein?, Ladoga, Montgonjery Eo., Ind., 

Is better than ever prepared to 
supply the Brethren and others who 
may wish to buy specimens of this 
very useful "new" breed of sheep. 
A fine lot for sale. Write for free 
circular, giving your County, and all 
who name the Almanac and request 
them, will get pictures of two of the 
best Cheviot Sheep in America. We 
also breed pure Poland China Pigs 
and sell at reasonable prices which will be quoted upon request. 

MONF V ^^^^^ ^^ money made. Buy you California Dry 
JTl.vyi'^1-^ I ^^^ Canned Fruits direct from the producer, 
freight paid. Agents wanted ! Men or women at their homes ! 
No traveling ! Honesty the capital required ! Some things free ! 
Send your address for particulars. 

J. S. FLORY. 
Station A. Los Angeles, Cal. 

The Gospel Messenger, a religious weekly, pub- 
lished at $1.50 per annum, should be in every family. 
The Young Disciple, at 50 cents per annum, is a 

paper for the little folks. Special rates to Sunday schools. 

Brethren's Quarterly, per copy, one year, 35 

cents; per quarter, lo cents; 3 copies, 25 cents; 8 copies, 40 cents; 
20 copies and over, 3J^ cents each. 

Juvenile Quarterly, three copies, 15 cents; 6 

copies, 25 cents; 10 copies and over, zYz cents each. 

Children at Work, for the youngest pupils of the 

Sunday school. Price, per annum, 20 cents; 10 copies, per 
quarter, 25 cents; 20 copies, per quarter, 40 cents. 

Brethren's Publishing Co., Uotint Uorris, 111. 



48 Brethreris Family Almanac. 



Northern Pacific Railroad Lands 

^^ AND 

IfeEE GOYEMMENT LMDS 



IN - 



NORTH DAKOTA. 



BRETHREN, you who are renting farm lands, and paying high crop and money 
rents. 

BRETHREN, you who are commencing your business lives and who are anxious to begin 
life by working for yourselves, and desire to have a home and a farm of your own. 

BRETHREN, you who own farms in the old settled States, where taxes are high and 
farms are expensive to buy or rent. 

BRETHREN, you who desire to keep your children near you, when grown to man o 
womanhood, but who are unable to buy expensive farms near the old homesteads. 

BRETHREN, you who wish to get a home and a farm without incurring a debt of a life 

time. 
BRETHREN, you who care to see your families more prosperous and blessed with 

home, surrounded with the comforts of life, in a climate that is healthful, where free 

public schools and churches exist. 

NORTH DAKOTA offers all this, and also better advantages to a new beginner or a mar 
with limited means than can be found in any of the older settled States. 

NORTH DAKOTA'S soil is strong and produces more crops per acre, without fertilizing 
than can be grown on old farm lands, where fertilizing is a costly necessity. 

NORTH DAKOTA has a healthful climate. The air is pure, bracing and free from ma 

laria. 
NORTH DAKOTA grows successfully wheat, oats, barley, rye, corn, flax, millet and Hun 

garian grasses, vegetables and small fruits of all varieties. ' 

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC LAND DEPARTMENT, in order to encourage emigratioi 
among the best class of Eastern farmers, has reduced its prices on its 3 fiOO fiOi. 
acres of choice farming lands in N^ortJv Dakota and is now offering the best anc 
choicest farming land from $2.50 to $5.00 per acre on 10 years^ thne, at ( 
per cent interest. Good government lands open for settlement free unde 
the homestead law adjacent to the Northern Pacific Hailroad Company^i 
lands. 

jg^^'For Information and Maps write to 

C. W. MOTT, 

W. H. Phipps, General Emigration Agent, N. P. R. R 

Land Commissioner, N. P. R. R. St. Paul, Minn. 



MANCHESTER COLLEGE LIBRARY 



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^ Brethren Historical H 
0^ Library ^ 

NORTH MANCHESTER, IND. 



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